Speidel Braumeister (brewmaster)

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FiveKaiBrewing

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Any one have experience with this machine? I was thinking of going all grain the old fashioned way but after seeing this I am pretty impressed.

THey are about 2 hours north of me so I might go check them out.

let me know what you guys think..
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

FiveKaiBrewing

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I also found this unit which is comparable in price and does a larger quantity at a time.

http://www.brumas.com/geraete_e.html

this is ball the Brau Eule

any feedback on which unit is better.

it seems that the speidel one has a rep here in florida and does also wine products so support might be better for it?
 

ocluke

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Any one have experience with this machine? I was thinking of going all grain the old fashioned way but after seeing this I am pretty impressed.

THey are about 2 hours north of me so I might go check them out.

let me know what you guys think..
There are videos of it in action on the manufacturer's website.

When I contacted the manufacturer overseas they told me that they would soon be sold through MoreBeer. I have no idea when, but you may want to contact them to see when they will be selling the product rather than go through that Florida outfit.
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

FiveKaiBrewing

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any reason why you wouldnt want to go through these cats in FL. I do agree that morebeer seems more Established but if you have any issues please share
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

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Looks like you can't sparge with it?:confused:
from what i was reading you can sparge by pulling out the malt tube and placing it on top of the system. this reduces the volume and then you just pour preheated water over the malt and it drips into the boil kettle. I read this on an australian brewing forum where more people have used this unit. I also saw another forum that was in german but had pictures of the procedure it looks simple.
 

Inodoro_Pereyra

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Hmmm...if I understand you right, then you need an extra pot to preheat the sparge water. Also, sparging is normally done by slowly sprinkling the hot water over the grain bed. Standing on top of the MLT with a pot full of hot water doesn't seem efficient, or safe...
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

FiveKaiBrewing

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the mlt or malt tube has special legs that turned to the side is made to keep the malt tube above the boil pot so it can drain at this time what they do is pour heated water in to the tube to increase the overal volume and sparge
 

Inodoro_Pereyra

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Yeah, I got that part. Actually, the "malt tube" was a "grain bucket" in my mind...;)
My point is that, once you got the malt tube hanging over the MLT (the Mash Lauter Tun, the big pot), the sparge water has to be sprinkled slowly over the grain bed. I don't see how you can do that manually, with just a pot of 170*F water.
 

samc

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When you analyze the device you start to see that it is a hot water or coffee urn modified with a fairly simple digital controller. They are asking a lot for it, which if you don't mind spending is a pretty cool looking unit. You can build one for a lot less $$$.
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

FiveKaiBrewing

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When you analyze the device you start to see that it is a hot water or coffee urn modified with a fairly simple digital controller. They are asking a lot for it, which if you don't mind spending is a pretty cool looking unit. You can build one for a lot less $$$.

Dude show me the plans for building something like this. from what i see this thing has pumps a computer albeit simple that dose rests and different temps etc. boils...

money is not really a issue, but if i have to build one and have to add materials plus man hours(time is money) and it comes out to about the same price, damn id rather buy a professionally built unit that has warranty. i have 4 kids a dog a company to run and,,,other stuff. i just want to open a box pour in some grain and brew.

but i do want to see what others have built that is similar to this machine.
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

FiveKaiBrewing

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Dude show me the plans for building something like this. from what i see this thing has pumps a computer albeit simple that dose rests and different temps etc. boils...

money is not really a issue, but if i have to build one and have to add materials plus man hours(time is money) and it comes out to about the same price, damn id rather buy a professionally built unit that has warranty. i have 4 kids a dog a company to run and,,,other stuff. i just want to open a box pour in some grain and brew.

but i do want to see what others have built that is similar to this machine.
funny how i forgot to mention Wife in my list of things that take away from "ME" time...lmao i guess she makes up for the time she takes away with "time"she gives me lmao
 

Inodoro_Pereyra

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i just want to open a box pour in some grain and brew.

but i do want to see what others have built that is similar to this machine.

Well, if you like it, and are ok with the price, go for it! At the end of the day, you're the one that's gonna use it... :)

Personally though, if you just want to enjoy your brew without any major complications, I'd go for a brew kit. You just literally have to mix it with water, pitch the yeast, slap on the airlock, and wait.

And with all the money you save, you can buy the wife lots of shoes, so she won't nag you about your new hobby... :D
 

jeffmeh

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If you can afford it and don't want to DIY, then go for it. Everything I have read has been positive. For about $3,000 for the 50l model, I cannot justify it.

That being said, I am looking to go DIY with a single-vessel, full-volume, electric unit. I currently do BIAB with propane, and I do not really see the need to sparge (although I am not at all critical of more traditional methods). I will probably use a basket lined with mesh or a voile bag, a PID with an electric element, and recirculate from bottom to top. I suspect that I can put the whole thing together for under $1,000.

There are some plans for a DIY Braumeister clone at http://arniew.wordpress.com/.
 

ocluke

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Hmmm...if I understand you right, then you need an extra pot to preheat the sparge water. Also, sparging is normally done by slowly sprinkling the hot water over the grain bed. Standing on top of the MLT with a pot full of hot water doesn't seem efficient, or safe...
True. This may require a 2nd vessel. That said, if you're ok with the volume and efficiency you get from a single infusion mash, I bet you would end up with some delicious beer made with only the first runnings. There was a guy posting somewhere around here about his efficiency with single infusion mashing in it, and I want to say it was high 60's or low 70's. I would totally live with that and just fork over the extra couple of dollars max in grain loss efficiency.
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

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If you can afford it and don't want to DIY, then go for it. Everything I have read has been positive. For about $3,000 for the 50l model, I cannot justify it.

That being said, I am looking to go DIY with a single-vessel, full-volume, electric unit. I currently do BIAB with propane, and I do not really see the need to sparge (although I am not at all critical of more traditional methods). I will probably use a basket lined with mesh or a voile bag, a PID with an electric element, and recirculate from bottom to top. I suspect that I can put the whole thing together for under $1,000.

There are some plans for a DIY Braumeister clone at http://arniew.wordpress.com/.
I have never done anything more than a 5 gallon batch and am happy with never going bigger. 10 gallons would just give me to much of the same beer. i am going to purchase the 5 gallon system and see how it goes.

I was contemplating the Brau Eule Brumas.com system but it is a 2 vessel system although it looks so badass!!!!
 

cclloyd

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Looks like a fancy toy for people with more money than time who want the easiest possible way to brew their own beer. I enjoy the time and effort it takes to produce a fine fermented beverage for reasons that this product could never satisfy. Not saying it won't make a good beer, just that it's not for me.
 

haussparker

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cclloyd said:
Looks like a fancy toy for people with more money than time who want the easiest possible way to brew their own beer. I enjoy the time and effort it takes to produce a fine fermented beverage for reasons that this product could never satisfy. Not saying it won't make a good beer, just that it's not for me.
I will agree with your comments. All these devices out there just takes the art, the creativity, hands on experience that I really love. Brewing beer is an art that you can connect to and appreciate much more when you get in there and use your hands and your own brain and a pencil rather than a digital plug and play device that anybody can use. There is a reason that grandmas cooking is always better than your moms, its because its done the old fashion way same with beer. The tried and true techniques from thousands of years practice is the way to go not electronic toys.
 

jbrookeiv

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jeffmeh said:
If you can afford it and don't want to DIY, then go for it. Everything I have read has been positive. For about $3,000 for the 50l model, I cannot justify it.

That being said, I am looking to go DIY with a single-vessel, full-volume, electric unit. I currently do BIAB with propane, and I do not really see the need to sparge (although I am not at all critical of more traditional methods). I will probably use a basket lined with mesh or a voile bag, a PID with an electric element, and recirculate from bottom to top. I suspect that I can put the whole thing together for under $1,000.

There are some plans for a DIY Braumeister clone at http://arniew.wordpress.com/.
That is an awesome blog.

The reason for recirculating is to increase efficiency, correct? The idea is intriguing, seems like I'd only need a March pump and an extra hole in my kettle to achieve this, since I already have a ball valve.

Recirculating seems a little overkill for BIAB, which is how I brew as well. The whole point is that it's simple and inexpensive. I wonder how much better your efficiency would be with recirculating?
 

jeffmeh

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That is an awesome blog.

The reason for recirculating is to increase efficiency, correct? The idea is intriguing, seems like I'd only need a March pump and an extra hole in my kettle to achieve this, since I already have a ball valve.

Recirculating seems a little overkill for BIAB, which is how I brew as well. The whole point is that it's simple and inexpensive. I wonder how much better your efficiency would be with recirculating?
My primary reasons for recirculating would be to even out the mash temperatures in the kettle while direct firing the electric element, and to give me the ability to clean in place. I'm getting 75-80% efficiency now, so I do not really expect to gain much, if any.

And you are absolutely correct that this falls in the "want" rather than the "need" category, lol. My main goal is to go electric at some point so I can more comfortably brew in the winter.
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

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all i am saying is that there are far larger more complicated systems for more money that do the same thing. i like the small footprint. it might take less skill but in the end i think you would be more able to reproduce beers more acurately and brew more in the long run becasue of the less ammount of work. I just can see my self building or buying one of those huge keg systems like a brutus when this can pretty much do the same thing for less money. From what I have read some guys that have built or bought 3 vessel systems like the brustus and had never seen a plug and play system like thing before regretted going through the work or spending all that money. I dont know im going to pull the trigger and let you guys know how it works out.

Im really dont care if the process to make beer is art as long as the result tastes like it is.
 

Inodoro_Pereyra

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I just can see my self building or buying one of those huge keg systems like a brutus when this can pretty much do the same thing for less money.
No, it can't, and it isn't. You can build a brutus type system for 1/3 what this system costs, and this system will never give you the flexibility a brutus will. For most of us here, it's not about having some cheap beer at hand, nor about how much we can brew: it's about learning from the process, so we can eventually make a better product, or one that's more suited to our particular tastes. Evolving.
That system could never give you that, simply because it takes control of the process. That way, you just become a material handler, not a brewer.

Im really dont care if the process to make beer is art as long as the result tastes like it is.
And that's great. If that's what you want, go for it. But, again, you can achieve the same goal, at a fraction of the money (and the work) by just brewing kits. But then again, it's your call.
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

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No, it can't, and it isn't. You can build a brutus type system for 1/3 what this system costs, and this system will never give you the flexibility a brutus will. For most of us here, it's not about having some cheap beer at hand, nor about how much we can brew: it's about learning from the process, so we can eventually make a better product, or one that's more suited to our particular tastes. Evolving.
That system could never give you that, simply because it takes control of the process. That way, you just become a material handler, not a brewer.



And that's great. If that's what you want, go for it. But, again, you can achieve the same goal, at a fraction of the money (and the work) by just brewing kits. But then again, it's your call.
no matter what system i choose to buy or make. I will not build a system that will do more than 5 gallons. and please tell me how a brutus type system could brew better beers. this seems to be the opposite found on other forums in Australia and Germany where people actually have lots of experience with this system many of which have moved from big 3 vessel systems to this one or one like it. technology and advancement ususally means a simpler path to the same result and that is what i consider this. once again i am just taking peoples word for it that have been brewing alot longer than i have.

are you sure that once you add up the cost of materials and put a price on your man hour that this system is still more expensive than a brutus? i for one dont think so.
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

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No, it can't, and it isn't. You can build a brutus type system for 1/3 what this system costs, and this system will never give you the flexibility a brutus will. For most of us here, it's not about having some cheap beer at hand, nor about how much we can brew: it's about learning from the process, so we can eventually make a better product, or one that's more suited to our particular tastes. Evolving.
That system could never give you that, simply because it takes control of the process. That way, you just become a material handler, not a brewer.



And that's great. If that's what you want, go for it. But, again, you can achieve the same goal, at a fraction of the money (and the work) by just brewing kits. But then again, it's your call.
if you know of a company that makes a 5 gallon system for 2000 let me know. I have to many projects under my belt to start a brewery build. i just want to open a box some assembly required and pow pour in the grain.
 

jeffmeh

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No, it can't, and it isn't. You can build a brutus type system for 1/3 what this system costs, and this system will never give you the flexibility a brutus will. For most of us here, it's not about having some cheap beer at hand, nor about how much we can brew: it's about learning from the process, so we can eventually make a better product, or one that's more suited to our particular tastes. Evolving.
That system could never give you that, simply because it takes control of the process. That way, you just become a material handler, not a brewer.



And that's great. If that's what you want, go for it. But, again, you can achieve the same goal, at a fraction of the money (and the work) by just brewing kits. But then again, it's your call.
While I agree that one can build a system for less money, I strongly disagree with the "material handler" comment. If that were true, anyone who has built a system with automation is no longer truly a brewer, nor are many commercial microbreweries. The brewer still controls the recipe, the ingredients, the mash parameters, and everything on the cold side.

The Braumeister makes the realization of the mash schedule easier (time and temperature), provides an excellent brewing system in a small footprint, and makes for easier cleanup due to fewer vessels. Sure, the capacity is limited by the size of the unit, but that is true in any system. It looks to me like in the 20l system one will have to mash to yield a more concentrated wort, then add make-up water. I am unclear as to how large a grain bill will fit in the tube, and I suspect that really high-gravity brews are out, or will yield less than 20l. So your point regarding flexibility is well taken, but due to capacity issues rather than automation or single-vessel design. However, if the OP understands those constraints and is not concerened about them, then more power to him.

Hey, I can prepare beef wellington and spend a good portion of the day doing it, employing a knife, cutting board, food processor, mixing bowl, rolling pin, and roasting pan. But there are also plenty of outstanding dishes I can prepare in a single pan, dutch oven, or crock pot. :mug:
 

jeffmeh

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if you know of a company that makes a 5 gallon system for 2000 let me know. I have to many projects under my belt to start a brewery build. i just want to open a box some assembly required and pow pour in the grain.
Well, there would be more work involved to assemble, but a propane tank and burner, 15-gallon pot and lid, voile bag, stainless rack to keep the bag off the bottom, ball valve kit, step bit, mash paddle, immersion chiller, and some silicon hose would give you the same functionality minus the electric firing and the automation, for about 1/4 the price. However, time is money, and there is nothing wrong with your plan.
 
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While I agree that one can build a system for less money, I strongly disagree with the "material handler" comment. If that were true, anyone who has built a system with automation is no longer truly a brewer, nor are many commercial microbreweries. The brewer still controls the recipe, the ingredients, the mash parameters, and everything on the cold side.

The Braumeister makes the realization of the mash schedule easier (time and temperature), provides an excellent brewing system in a small footprint, and makes for easier cleanup due to fewer vessels. Sure, the capacity is limited by the size of the unit, but that is true in any system. It looks to me like in the 20l system one will have to mash to yield a more concentrated wort, then add make-up water. I am unclear as to how large a grain bill will fit in the tube, and I suspect that really high-gravity brews are out, or will yield less than 20l. So your point regarding flexibility is well taken, but due to capacity issues rather than automation or single-vessel design. However, if the OP understands those constraints and is not concerened about them, then more power to him.

Hey, I can prepare beef wellington and spend a good portion of the day doing it, employing a knife, cutting board, food processor, mixing bowl, rolling pin, and roasting pan. But there are also plenty of outstanding dishes I can prepare in a single pan, dutch oven, or crock pot. :mug:
from what i have understood high gravity brews and larger grain bills can be achieved by making wort once and then leaving the wort in the vessel disposing of spent grain and adding new grain and starting a new session using the wort from the previous session. when i heard that people were using this method to make any beer they wanted to i was like score. I originally wanted to get the 50 liter unit because i was not limited in grain bill size if doing 5 gallon batches. now i can stick with the 5 gallon system save 1000 dollars but i have to let the system go an extra session for big beers. i mean sure its an extra step.

And i really disagree with the comment of just being a material handler. I was at a micro brewery yesterday (Big Bear Brewery in florida) and alot of processes are automated and the guy that runs the place is called a BREWMASTER not a MATERIAL HANDLER!
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

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I have pretty much made up my mind on purchasing this system. now its just a matter of seeing if i can get a better deal.

I contacted Speidel yesterday and it seems that Morebeer.com is going to be the sole distributor for this product in the near future. I am assuming that they will be able to offer better a better price on this unit because they have more buying power and hopefully pass on that savings to us.

the current distributor does not have any stock and their reason for this was that since it ships direct from the Germany to your door you are saving on shipping costs from Germany to them then to you. they pass on that savings. I don't know about this and to tell you the truth i got the impression that morebeer4u.com is a really small operation and that is why they do not have anything in stock.

i might wait for morebeer.com to get these in before i go for it.
 

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That's very interesting regarding adding a second grain bill to the first wort to make a high-gravity brew. That should work, though I wonder what effect it will have on the pH of the mash. I would definitely invest in a pH meter, which is a good practice regardless.

Good luck with the unit. I would be very interested in some feedback on it once you get a few batches under your belt. I hope you do not have to wait too long to get a hold of one.
 

Inodoro_Pereyra

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Hmmm...looks like my comments created some discomfort...

First, if I have offended anybody, my apologies. That wasn't my intention.

Multipletazas: it was never my intention to push you into making a decision, one way or another. As I said before, you're the one who has to be happy with your system. If you like the braumeister, by all means, go for it. I was just stating my opinion.

Also, consider that my beer brewing experience, as of today, is exactly "0". Not only I have never brewed a single beer batch, but I actually don't even drink beer.

However, I have a lot of experience designing and building machines.

My comment above was in response to the comment I quoted. I believe the brutus is more flexible than the braumeister. I also KNOW you can build a brutus at a fraction of the cost.

Let me give you an example.

I'm now in the process of designing a system, for me to hopefully build in the near future. A very important (and expensive) part of that system, at least for me, is gonna be the brew kettle, which I plan to build out of 1/8" thick copper plate. Looking it up online (never the cheapest choice when it comes to metals), a 36"x48" sheet of 1/8" thick copper is $660, give or take a few bucks. That sheet will be enough for a 7 gallon kettle, with a cone bottom and lid.
Add to that a couple of kegs, plumbing, heating elements, etc, and I'm looking at about $1200-1400 for the whole rig. And that because I want a kettle that most will probably qualify as an unnecessary luxury item. I could easily make the rig with 3 kegs (that I can find used for about $50 each), and the whole system would be way less than a grand.
I could even build the kettle out of thinner copper sheet (#16, or even #18 would be more than enough for a 7 gallon kettle), and still keep it under a grand. And, with that, I'd be able to boil a full 5 gallon batch, instead of having to do a partial boil. Not saying it's better than a partial boil, or even that I'd do it, but if I wanted to, I could.

Now, about my "material handler" comment.
If that comment sounded in any way derogatory, again, that wasn't my intention at all. I used to be a material handler at a factory. A material handler is the person who feeds the "recipe" (the materials) to a machine, so it can do its job. He does have control over the recipe (even if he doesn't formulate it), but not over the process. That's why I made that comment.
It's true that micro brewery systems (and some systems here) are fully automated, yet their operator is called a "master brewer" instead of a "material handler". But, in those systems, usually the master brewer has complete control over the whole process, which he can fully customize to his needs. I haven't really looked that deeply into the braumeister's features, but I don't think it gives the user that kind of control.

So, those are the reasons I said what I said. Again, I apologize if anyone felt offended by any of my comments, but, right or not, that's my opinion of it.
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

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Hmmm...looks like my comments created some discomfort...

First, if I have offended anybody, my apologies. That wasn't my intention.

Multipletazas: it was never my intention to push you into making a decision, one way or another. As I said before, you're the one who has to be happy with your system. If you like the braumeister, by all means, go for it. I was just stating my opinion.

Also, consider that my beer brewing experience, as of today, is exactly "0". Not only I have never brewed a single beer batch, but I actually don't even drink beer.

However, I have a lot of experience designing and building machines.

My comment above was in response to the comment I quoted. I believe the brutus is more flexible than the braumeister. I also KNOW you can build a brutus at a fraction of the cost.

Let me give you an example.

I'm now in the process of designing a system, for me to hopefully build in the near future. A very important (and expensive) part of that system, at least for me, is gonna be the brew kettle, which I plan to build out of 1/8" thick copper plate. Looking it up online (never the cheapest choice when it comes to metals), a 36"x48" sheet of 1/8" thick copper is $660, give or take a few bucks. That sheet will be enough for a 7 gallon kettle, with a cone bottom and lid.
Add to that a couple of kegs, plumbing, heating elements, etc, and I'm looking at about $1200-1400 for the whole rig. And that because I want a kettle that most will probably qualify as an unnecessary luxury item. I could easily make the rig with 3 kegs (that I can find used for about $50 each), and the whole system would be way less than a grand.
I could even build the kettle out of thinner copper sheet (#16, or even #18 would be more than enough for a 7 gallon kettle), and still keep it under a grand. And, with that, I'd be able to boil a full 5 gallon batch, instead of having to do a partial boil. Not saying it's better than a partial boil, or even that I'd do it, but if I wanted to, I could.

Now, about my "material handler" comment.
If that comment sounded in any way derogatory, again, that wasn't my intention at all. I used to be a material handler at a factory. A material handler is the person who feeds the "recipe" (the materials) to a machine, so it can do its job. He does have control over the recipe (even if he doesn't formulate it), but not over the process. That's why I made that comment.
It's true that micro brewery systems (and some systems here) are fully automated, yet their operator is called a "master brewer" instead of a "material handler". But, in those systems, usually the master brewer has complete control over the whole process, which he can fully customize to his needs. I haven't really looked that deeply into the braumeister's features, but I don't think it gives the user that kind of control.

So, those are the reasons I said what I said. Again, I apologize if anyone felt offended by any of my comments, but, right or not, that's my opinion of it.
Sounds good man i take no offense what so ever. You know how to work copper? thats pretty cool. I didnt want to spend the 300 dollars they were asking for the cool copper lid for the braumaister so im going to take a shot at making it my self. im not sure how to make that but ill figure it out. if you have any pointers let me know as i could use them .
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

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Hmmm...looks like my comments created some discomfort...

First, if I have offended anybody, my apologies. That wasn't my intention.

Multipletazas: it was never my intention to push you into making a decision, one way or another. As I said before, you're the one who has to be happy with your system. If you like the braumeister, by all means, go for it. I was just stating my opinion.

Also, consider that my beer brewing experience, as of today, is exactly "0". Not only I have never brewed a single beer batch, but I actually don't even drink beer.

However, I have a lot of experience designing and building machines.

My comment above was in response to the comment I quoted. I believe the brutus is more flexible than the braumeister. I also KNOW you can build a brutus at a fraction of the cost.

Let me give you an example.

I'm now in the process of designing a system, for me to hopefully build in the near future. A very important (and expensive) part of that system, at least for me, is gonna be the brew kettle, which I plan to build out of 1/8" thick copper plate. Looking it up online (never the cheapest choice when it comes to metals), a 36"x48" sheet of 1/8" thick copper is $660, give or take a few bucks. That sheet will be enough for a 7 gallon kettle, with a cone bottom and lid.
Add to that a couple of kegs, plumbing, heating elements, etc, and I'm looking at about $1200-1400 for the whole rig. And that because I want a kettle that most will probably qualify as an unnecessary luxury item. I could easily make the rig with 3 kegs (that I can find used for about $50 each), and the whole system would be way less than a grand.
I could even build the kettle out of thinner copper sheet (#16, or even #18 would be more than enough for a 7 gallon kettle), and still keep it under a grand. And, with that, I'd be able to boil a full 5 gallon batch, instead of having to do a partial boil. Not saying it's better than a partial boil, or even that I'd do it, but if I wanted to, I could.

Now, about my "material handler" comment.
If that comment sounded in any way derogatory, again, that wasn't my intention at all. I used to be a material handler at a factory. A material handler is the person who feeds the "recipe" (the materials) to a machine, so it can do its job. He does have control over the recipe (even if he doesn't formulate it), but not over the process. That's why I made that comment.
It's true that micro brewery systems (and some systems here) are fully automated, yet their operator is called a "master brewer" instead of a "material handler". But, in those systems, usually the master brewer has complete control over the whole process, which he can fully customize to his needs. I haven't really looked that deeply into the braumeister's features, but I don't think it gives the user that kind of control.

So, those are the reasons I said what I said. Again, I apologize if anyone felt offended by any of my comments, but, right or not, that's my opinion of it.
Just a question if you dont bree or even drink beer why would you make a system like that? do you sell them?
 

Inodoro_Pereyra

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Sounds good man i take no offense what so ever. You know how to work copper? thats pretty cool. I didnt want to spend the 300 dollars they were asking for the cool copper lid for the braumaister so im going to take a shot at making it my self. im not sure how to make that but ill figure it out. if you have any pointers let me know as i could use them .
Thank you. English is not my native language, and, despite my best efforts, I'm still painfully limited at it, so I'm permanently worried that my words may be misinterpreted. Last thing I want is to create bad blood. I come here to learn, and to eventually give a hand, if I can.
Copper is by far he easiest metal to work with. All you need is a few hammers, some wood to make a form onto which to mold your piece, and a good arm. Anyways, for what I see, you live not so far away from me, so, if you decide to go for it, shoot me a PM, and I'll help you.

Just a question if you dont bree or even drink beer why would you make a system like that? do you sell them?
I never said I don't brew...;) I said I haven't brewed BEER yet.
Right now, I've been unemployed for almost 1 1/2 year, fixing computers from home to survive, so the prospect of buying grain and the other stuff to make beer is definitely out of the question. So I've been brewing very small batches (less than 2 liters each) of "something", using chick peas as the grain, and baker's yeast. That way I can learn the process, without wrecking my very flimsy economy at the time. I have even "malted" a couple batches of grain, so, right now, I have 3 batches (1 bottle conditioning, and 2 in the fermentors for the last 3 weeks) waiting to be tasted, and an infected batch, that I tasted and dumped down the drain (it was beyond horrible) yesterday.
Meanwhile, the reason why I don't like beer is because "beer" ( as I "knew" it up to a short time ago) is bitter, and I have a really sweet tooth. But lately I've been reading everything I could get my hands on about beer styles, and I think I found a style I might like (hefeweizen) to a point that I may want to brew it regularly, especially with added fruit (I'm thinking about a mango hefeweizen in the (hopefully) near future...).

And, who knows? Maybe I could sell it in the future, if people are interested...:)
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

FiveKaiBrewing

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Thank you. English is not my native language, and, despite my best efforts, I'm still painfully limited at it, so I'm permanently worried that my words may be misinterpreted. Last thing I want is to create bad blood. I come here to learn, and to eventually give a hand, if I can.
Copper is by far he easiest metal to work with. All you need is a few hammers, some wood to make a form onto which to mold your piece, and a good arm. Anyways, for what I see, you live not so far away from me, so, if you decide to go for it, shoot me a PM, and I'll help you.



I never said I don't brew...;) I said I haven't brewed BEER yet.
Right now, I've been unemployed for almost 1 1/2 year, fixing computers from home to survive, so the prospect of buying grain and the other stuff to make beer is definitely out of the question. So I've been brewing very small batches (less than 2 liters each) of "something", using chick peas as the grain, and baker's yeast. That way I can learn the process, without wrecking my very flimsy economy at the time. I have even "malted" a couple batches of grain, so, right now, I have 3 batches (1 bottle conditioning, and 2 in the fermentors for the last 3 weeks) waiting to be tasted, and an infected batch, that I tasted and dumped down the drain (it was beyond horrible) yesterday.
Meanwhile, the reason why I don't like beer is because "beer" ( as I "knew" it up to a short time ago) is bitter, and I have a really sweet tooth. But lately I've been reading everything I could get my hands on about beer styles, and I think I found a style I might like (hefeweizen) to a point that I may want to brew it regularly, especially with added fruit (I'm thinking about a mango hefeweizen in the (hopefully) near future...).

And, who knows? Maybe I could sell it in the future, if people are interested...:)
You should try Hoegaarden. i love this beer in the summer. Hefeweizen is one of my favorite styles. I tried a beer called purple haze the other day which is infused with rasberry and it was pretty good if you like the fruit infused beers.

sounds cool. about the copper work. maybe ill just pay you for the hood build, drop off the copper and you call me when its done. :mug:
 

Inodoro_Pereyra

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You should try Hoegaarden. i love this beer in the summer. Hefeweizen is one of my favorite styles. I tried a beer called purple haze the other day which is infused with rasberry and it was pretty good if you like the fruit infused beers.

sounds cool. about the copper work. maybe ill just pay you for the hood build, drop off the copper and you call me when its done. :mug:
Hoegaarden... For what I just read, that's witbier, right? Is all witbier sweet, like hefeweizen? I will definitely try it in the future, thanks for the tip. :)

Not a problem. Whenever you're ready, PM me, and we'll take it from there. Just be aware that I don't have the equipment to braze it yet, so the hood will have to be one solid piece.
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

FiveKaiBrewing

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well from what i understand the braumeister should be on its way any day now. communication with thorsten has been good he responds to my emails quickly.
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

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Just got my 5 gallon system.. its big! looks great I will post more pics when its up and running. thanks! Thorsten your the man!

IMG-20110325-00151.jpg
 

-Dan-

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Very nice! What place in FL did you buy that from? 2hr north of you means around 45min south of me here :) Just curious

As far as Speidel goes; they are an extremly well organized and good company. They have made brewery and winery equipment long before many of us even know how beer was in spelled. :)
 
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FiveKaiBrewing

FiveKaiBrewing

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morebeer4u.com

the guys name is thorsten.

he is in cape coral.. i think you can go see it in person at his location but he has no stock available. anything you buy he will have to order from speidel and it ships direct to you.
 
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