Specific Gravity Readings

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jg12333

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So i brewed my first brew; a Brewers Best Weisenbier, about 3 days ago and i dont want to sound like a noob And i know this has been talked about before but ill say it anyway after 3 days no bubbleing in the airlock i took the lid off ecpecting to see a layer of foam i only saw little spots of foam, so i took another SG reading and boom same reading as the first day. and it worrys me after 3 days because im pretty sure i started my yeast in about 90 degree water and im begining to believe that i might have killed it from the begining.
 

Kungpaodog

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What temperature is it at? Did you re-hydrate dry yeast at 90*?

Three days seems to be a bit long for a lag time. I'd think if it doesn't show life in the next day or two that you could do well to pitch a package of dry yeast. Try safale S-05. I've had good batches by just dumping in the dry package, but others may disagree with whether or not this is best, but it certainly is easiest.
 

rsmith179

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Agreed. Normally you'll see people asking if their beer is done fermenting after a good 2-3 days of bubbling. If you haven't seen any activity in the airlock at all and the gravity is still the same as the OG, it sounds like there's nothing going on inside of your primary. I would highly reccommend that you repitch something like the S-05 as soon as possible. Right now, you have a bunch of sugar water sitting in a container. Without active yeast and alcohol, this wort is an open target for other nasties such as bacteria to have a feast on. Once it gets bubbling, the bacteria and other stuff will have a hard time keeping up with the yeast. But again, I would really make sure that this is going soon.

Also, try bringing it to a place with higher temps. Sometimes you can start an active fermenatation just by moving it into another room with high temps to rouse up the yeast in there. I hope all goes well for you!
 
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jg12333

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Yeah i rehydrated in 90 degree water. Theres occasional bubbling in the airlock now not much but its denfiilty slowing producing co2. So i guesse im alright? Maby theres only a small amount of yeast? I also moved it to another room last night after i took the SG i think it may have been to cold where i was keeping it on a tile floor in the laundry room which isnt the warmest room in the house id say it stays in the mid 60's in there. Maby too cold?
 

Yooper

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Mid-60s is perfect for ales! Do you have a stick-on thermometer for the fermenter? Those are great, because it's not room temperature you want to monitor, but the temperature of the fermenting beer. I like those kinds you buy for aquariums- cheap and fairly accurate.
 
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jg12333

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No not yet im gonna have to pick a stick on thermometer but all is well now nice foam has devolped and the airlock is bubbeling away it just took 3 days. I dunno if the move to the warmer room helped i think it did but what do i know my first time.
 

Kungpaodog

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Glad to hear it started off on its own. 63 -ish is a great temperature for ales, so if it was below that the lag may have been more than normal.

X2 on the stick on thermometers; they are easy to use, cheap, and a great way to know what temp your beer is at.

Next time you may double check the directions on the dry yeast since some say to rehydrate and some say to pitch directly into the wort. There are many differing opinions, but as a new brewer following the manufacturers directions would be a good place to start. Now go start your next batch so you have something to do while you leave the first batch alone!
 
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