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flatbushpenguin

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I'm fairly new to this whole cider making process (And enjoying it so much!) and wanted to make my first batch of sweetened carbed cider.
I wanted to know if anybody has pasteurized their bottles in a sous vide instead of a stovetop?
Thanks!
 

Epond83

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The only downside is the output power of the sous vide.
When you put the bottles in the pot the temp will drop and have to come back up to 160. The stove will recover faster. But as said sous vide is more precise and you won't over shoot 160 by much.
 
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flatbushpenguin

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Lower temp/longer time=higher temp/shorter time.

IMHO, sous vide is the safest and most accurate way to go about pasteurizing a bottled carbonated beverage.
Is there a chart somewhere on this forum to see the temp/times?
Thanks so much for the help!
 

Rick Stephens

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If you get bottle content temps to 150ƒ you can consider the yeast safely dead.
 

Chalkyt

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Yes, sous vide is a good way to go about it. You really only need a temperature of 65C for around 10 minutes then let the bottles cool down to be really confident that the job is done. See my post of 1 Feb 2021 and the attached file. It has information on temperatures and times for pasteurisation. There is also information from Yooper on kegging.

After a bit of thought I have added the following, although you will pick this up if you read the attachment to the 1 Feb post.

The 180-190 approach involves getting the waterbath up to this sort of temperature then turning the heat off. If you put the bottles in when they are at room temperature they will heat up and and at the same time the waterbath will cool down. Depending on the volume of hot water and the number of bottles put in, an equilibrium temperature will be reached around 65C-70C (roughly 150F-160C). i.e the bottles won't get any hotter than this so bottle bomb risk is reduced.

Using a sous vide or even a stovetop to simply hold the waterbath temperature to 65C-70C until the bottles heat up achieves the same result, and is easy to control. I use the sous vide method (a 1000W unit which only takes a few minutes to get the waterbath temperature back up after the initial drop when the bottles are put in) and get a great sweet carbonated cider. The trick is to make sure the bottle temperature is held high enough for long enough. Around half of the pasteurisation takes place during cool-down due to the residual heat retained when the bottles are removed from the waterbath.
Have fun!
 
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circitmage

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I'm fairly new to this whole cider making process (And enjoying it so much!) and wanted to make my first batch of sweetened carbed cider.
I wanted to know if anybody has pasteurized their bottles in a sous vide instead of a stovetop?
Thanks!
Do this all the time ... Great and fool proof
 
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flatbushpenguin

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Yes, sous vide is a good way to go about it. You really only need a temperature of 65C for around 10 minutes then let the bottles cool down to be really confident that the job is done. See my post of 1 Feb 2021 and the attached file. It has information on temperatures and times for pasteurisation. There is also information from Yooper on kegging.

After a bit of thought I have added the following, although you will pick this up if you read the attachment to the 1 Feb post.

The 180-190 approach involves getting the waterbath up to this sort of temperature then turning the heat off. If you put the bottles in when they are at room temperature they will heat up and and at the same time the waterbath will cool down. Depending on the volume of hot water and the number of bottles put in, an equilibrium temperature will be reached around 65C-70C (roughly 150F-160C). i.e the bottles won't get any hotter than this so bottle bomb risk is reduced.

Using a sous vide or even a stovetop to simply hold the waterbath temperature to 65C-70C until the bottles heat up achieves the same result, and is easy to control. I use the sous vide method (a 1000W unit which only takes a few minutes to get the waterbath temperature back up after the initial drop when the bottles are put in) and get a great sweet carbonated cider. The trick is to make sure the bottle temperature is held high enough for long enough. Around half of the pasteurisation takes place during cool-down due to the residual heat retained when the bottles are removed from the waterbath.
Have fun!
Thanks!!!
 
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