Sous Vide in eBIAB??

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wyowolf

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Yes I know its overkill... but its free and basically the same concept. Just wondering if anyone else has used their EBIAB rig for doing this and how it turned out?
I've watched a few videos on it and it seems like a great way to cook, but want to try it for free before going to smaller kitchen type one...
 
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I have a sansaire sous vide and use it every week, it's the best innovation in cooking since the crock pot. As I was building my electric BIAB rig I realized it is also a defacto giant sous vide, and though I've not used it that way yet, there is no reason why you couldn't. Any basic PID will hold temps precisely enough to perform on par with even the most expensive commercial sous vide machine.

If you already have a vacuum sealer for storing hops you have everything you need to become a sous vide virtuoso, I say go for it.

My favorite sous vide recipe is David Chang's Momofuku pork shoulder, but instead of brining overnight in a mixture of salt and brown sugar, just sprinkle the two all over before sealing in a bag then cook at 170f for 24-36 hours. The result is meltingly tender meat with a clean, concentrated porkiness to which you can add sauce to make bbq pulled pork, or juniper, oregano and garlic for carnitas; the sky is the limit.

edit: sous vide has overtaken my crockpot, gas grill, and even my smoker as the most dependable, easiest, and fool-proof way to make delicious meals. Add a searing torch or a few minutes under the broiler to crisp and color the surface of meats, and most people couldn't tell it from the grill if it weren't for the dried out texture of most grilled foods.
 
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wyowolf

wyowolf

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Yes I do have vac sealer...ive seen the term for awhile but didn't understand it til now...i use bcs 460 controller on it..
 
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wyowolf

wyowolf

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Also...a bit confused about how long it takes...can you leave it too long ? Etc
 
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Steaks can take 30-40 minutes, perfectly cooked all the way through and ready to sear in a pan or broiler at a moment's notice for serving up a steak dinner that can compete with Morton's. Things like pork shoulder, beef roast, etc. benefit from an extended time at the recommended temperature for a given protein, for period of 24 hours on up to 72 depending on what you want. During extended cooking, enzymes within the meat will break down tough cuts and gelatinize collagen for results unlike anything you've ever tasted before. There are forums all about sous vide as well as cookbooks, and lots of recipes on pinterest too. Check it out.
 
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wyowolf

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trying some lamb loin chops now... i set at 136 for 2 hrs? does that seem right?
 
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wyowolf

wyowolf

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Well came out more med well than med rare...but I like the process, 136 is too high.
 
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Hey that looks great! Man you didn't waste any time at all trying it out, how did it taste?

There are tables with proper times and temps for each protein according to the desired level of doneness, a degree up or down can make a huge difference but for your first try it looks like you knocked it out of the park!
 
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wyowolf

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Hey that looks great! Man you didn't waste any time at all trying it out, how did it taste?

There are tables with proper times and temps for each protein according to the desired level of doneness, a degree up or down can make a huge difference but for your first try it looks like you knocked it out of the park!
it tasted fine. I went by a few online tables I found... they said 130 to 135. I was thinking that it seemed too low. well it wasnt. I should have started at 130 I think...they said 2 hrs and i went about 2.5 because wife got home later than I was expecting... but taste was fine, I used some butter to brown it and then cooked the wife's asparagas in that... i wont eat it, lol, but she said it was good...
 

betarhoalphadelta

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I didn't quite use an eBIAB setup, but I did use parts of my brew rig for my first sous vide attempt. See YouTube below. eBIAB is a bit of overkill, but will certainly work, especially as your first attempts to determine if you want to buy a dedicated circulator. But if you like it, spend the money and get the circulator. It's much more convenient.

Personally I don't often do things like steak in it. I find that I can get a better result with traditional grilling on a steak. But there are some things that that you can do with sous vide that you simply CANNOT produce with any other method. I.e. short ribs cooked medium rare that are so tender that you can cut them with a spoon. My girlfriend won't let me smoke pork ribs any more because once she had them in the sous vide declared them the best ribs she's ever had. Tough cuts can be cooked longer duration and made tender without taking them up well past well done as you do with braising. And "on the edge" cuts like tri tip can shine there as well, especially due to its inconsistent shape.

 
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I have a full on kal style electric brewery. My most recent sous vide was a 13lb turkey. cut it all into pieces for separate bags. dark meat went at 165 for 3 hours and the I dropped it to 145 and added the breasts for 2 more hours. delicious.
 
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wyowolf

wyowolf

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I didn't quite use an eBIAB setup, but I did use parts of my brew rig for my first sous vide attempt. See YouTube below. eBIAB is a bit of overkill, but will certainly work, especially as your first attempts to determine if you want to buy a dedicated circulator. But if you like it, spend the money and get the circulator. It's much more convenient.

Personally I don't often do things like steak in it. I find that I can get a better result with traditional grilling on a steak. But there are some things that that you can do with sous vide that you simply CANNOT produce with any other method. I.e. short ribs cooked medium rare that are so tender that you can cut them with a spoon. My girlfriend won't let me smoke pork ribs any more because once she had them in the sous vide declared them the best ribs she's ever had. Tough cuts can be cooked longer duration and made tender without taking them up well past well done as you do with braising. And "on the edge" cuts like tri tip can shine there as well, especially due to its inconsistent shape.

Going to try salmon tonight...we did buy a dedicated unit but it's not here yet...consensus seems 122 for 30 to 40 mi n?
 
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wyowolf

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Second attempt at this. Steelhead, came out perfect. Cooked at 124 for about 45 min. Just added salt/pepper a little olive oil and lemon to bag and dropped them in. Ordered tha Anova unit... will see how it works...
 

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