Sources for Long Natural Gas Hose

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OBBrewery

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Does anyone have a source for long flexible gas lines for natural gas similar to something used for big smoker rigs?

I am looking for a 1" hose, that is long enough to temporarily hook up at my gas meter outside on brew days so I can brew in my detached garage about 65' away. I already have the stub tapped just after the gas meter. The temporary line will just lay on the ground.

I have a concrete driveway in the way, so I will not be able to trench in the ground and install a permanent one below grade.

I am trying to find a source that has one I am looking for, but not spend $600 for a simple hose. Texas Smokers has a 50' line for $580 here:

https://tejassmokers.com/Generator-Hose/28

Thanks in advance for the help!
 

aangel

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Wide diameter NG hoses are expensive. Corrugated (ie flexible) gas hoses also create so much flow resistance that, at 50 feet, your flow will be so poor that your BTU/H will also be negligible. If you must have natural gas, and your heart is set on brewing in your detached garage, you're looking at digging a trench.

If you're going to spend that kind of effort/coin anyway, may as well plumb your garage while you're at it.
 

wilserbrewer

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Sorry, not much help with the gas line. Any inexpensive solution I could offer would not be to "code" and may be dangerous.

I would look into electric brewing, better and cheaper imo.
 

oujens

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Sorry, not much help with the gas line. Any inexpensive solution I could offer would not be to "code" and may be dangerous.

I would look into electric brewing, better and cheaper imo.

You might strongly consider electric. I had a NG line off my patio and enjoyed it, but if you have to pay out of pocket I think electric is a strong consideration. Even if it's induction.
 

Sbe2

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Being experienced in the field, this is a bad idea. A gas line should never be exposed to the atmosphere. The only part that is supposed to be exposed is the steel riser that plumbs into your meter.

Air hoses are meant to transport air, not natural gas. God forbid something were to cut your line, would you know what to do?

Like aangel said, it would be wise to dig a trench and go the proper route.
 

dcbc

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Being experienced in the field, this is a bad idea. A gas line should never be exposed to the atmosphere. The only part that is supposed to be exposed is the steel riser that plumbs into your meter.

Air hoses are meant to transport air, not natural gas. God forbid something were to cut your line, would you know what to do?

Like aangel said, it would be wise to dig a trench and go the proper route.
To be clear, the air hose I use is not a permanent installation. It is attached to my brew stand and attaches via a gas QD to a 3/4" black iron pipe with a valve on it I had professionally installed. When I'm not brewing, it isn't connected. If it is cut, I can shut off the gas feeding it in seconds. I never would suggest it for a permanent installation. Sorry if there was any confusion there.
 

Sbe2

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To be clear, the air hose I use is not a permanent installation. It is attached to my brew stand and attaches via a gas QD to a 3/4" black iron pipe with a valve on it I had professionally installed. When I'm not brewing, it isn't connected. If it is cut, I can shut off the gas feeding it in seconds. I never would suggest it for a permanent installation. Sorry if there was any confusion there.
I don't want to come off as being harsh, but working around natural gas, we take safety to the extreme. Hell, all of my work clothes and PPE are flame resistant.

I just don't want anyone to get hurt just for the sake of convenience, just my .02
 

dcbc

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I don't want to come off as being harsh, but working around natural gas, we take safety to the extreme. Hell, all of my work clothes and PPE are flame resistant.

I just don't want anyone to get hurt just for the sake of convenience, just my .02
I understand. But just to add some details . . .

When I had the pipe installed, I asked the installer about my plan to use the hose. He said he didn't see any problem with it in a temporary installation scenario. He even stood on it and commented that the fact that it didn't compress was probably better than any of the purpose built lines out there.

My chief concern is dry rot. I closely inspect my jumper hose before each brew. It is stored indoors away from direct sun light.

Again, I appreciate your concern since this is something you deal with on a professional level. But I am eight plus years in with it and it is a robust piece of equipment and has been trouble free. But I keep my eyes on it for sure.
 

jammin

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Being experienced in the field, this is a bad idea. A gas line should never be exposed to the atmosphere. The only part that is supposed to be exposed is the steel riser that plumbs into your meter.

Air hoses are meant to transport air, not natural gas. God forbid something were to cut your line, would you know what to do?

Like aangel said, it would be wise to dig a trench and go the proper route.
There are all sorts of gas lines exposed to the atmosphere which are no risk at all - the code states they must be 3.5" above grade and cribbed accordingly when needed (rooftops etc).

I do agree that installing a couple risers and trenching to the garage is a viable option. The 1 problem is you might need to upgrade delivery pressure from 7" to 2psi. Alternatively, you might ask your utility if they would install a new meter at your garage; downside would be a separate sevice fee but they would probably run the line for free.
 

hotair

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DO IT RIGHT! Just had a home fire in our neighborhood. Owners son ran the yellow flexi natural gas line to covert wood fireplace to gas. He did not ground it properly and one lightning strike later an oh **** moment.
Believe you need training and permit to properly install as fires have happened all over the US with this flexy material
 

Newsman

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I agree. TEMPORARY gas line, removed after each use, should be safe, if done like dcbc does. Get a permanent valve installed, and run a temporary line to it, so if, Ghod forbid, it gets cut or something, you can shut it off without having to turn off the gas to your entire house.
 

dcbc

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I agree. TEMPORARY gas line, removed after each use, should be safe, if done like dcbc does. Get a permanent valve installed, and run a temporary line to it, so if, Ghod forbid, it gets cut or something, you can shut it off without having to turn off the gas to your entire house.
This stuff is so thick that the idea of it's being cut seems pretty outrageous. You'd have to hack away at it pretty intentionally to break through. Like I mentioned, dry rot worries me more. Regular inspection and soapy water checks ease those worries.
 

wilserbrewer

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I am looking for a 1" hose, that is long enough to temporarily hook up at my gas meter outside on brew days so I can brew in my detached garage ....!

Sure, I could likely run NG through just about any hose for years without an issue, hell you could use a garden hose, that doesn't mean it's a good idea.

Important to note that the OP is planning to run this line into another building, a detached garage! The idea that someone could possibly run over to the main 65' away and shut the gas off is wishful thinking.

A natural gas leak and explosion is like a bomb that could blow the building to splinters.

There is good reason that outdoor underground gas line can be HFPE plastic, and indoor lines are black iron heavy pipe or stainless steel.

I'm typically risk averse, but not w/ NG.
 

jammin

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Sure, I could likely run NG through just about any hose for years without an issue, hell you could use a garden hose, that doesn't mean it's a good idea.

Important to note that the OP is planning to run this line into another building, a detached garage! The idea that someone could possibly run over to the main 65' away and shut the gas off is wishful thinking.

A natural gas leak and explosion is like a bomb that could blow the building to splinters.

There is good reason that outdoor underground gas line can be HFPE plastic, and indoor lines are black iron heavy pipe or stainless steel.

I'm typically risk averse, but not w/ NG.
funny how people are so scared of natural gas. it's probably not even one the top 5 maybe even 10 causes of house fires. people say to go electric because it's safer even though faulty wiring is the #1 cause of structure fires. go figure
 

aangel

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funny how people are so scared of natural gas. it's probably not even one the top 5 maybe even 10 causes of house fires. people say to go electric because it's safer even though faulty wiring is the #1 cause of structure fires. go figure
With either electric OR gas, you should make sure your project is up to code, because your home owner's / renter's insurance will not protect you if it's not. In BOTH cases that means hiring someone to do it right.

Would anyone with an iota of common sense ever recommend a lay person wire 240V/30A, or plumb up natural gas to an accessory building by themselves? NO!
 

GilaMinumBeer

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With either electric OR gas, you should make sure your project is up to code, because your home owner's / renter's insurance will not protect you if it's not. In BOTH cases that means hiring someone to do it right.

Would anyone with an iota of common sense ever recommend a lay person wire 240V/30A, or plumb up natural gas to an accessory building by themselves? NO!
Hiring a lay person does not guarantee common sense, nor does it guarantee code compliance.

A common issue with trades and small jobs is a lack of permits, no inspections, and code violations.

There are some areas in the states that do not require licensed trades to perform work. As to the insurance coverage comment, having an inspection is entirely different than having the work performed by a lay person. A homeowner can pull a permit and get inspections just as easily, depending on jurisdictional policies.
 

dcbc

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Sure, I could likely run NG through just about any hose for years without an issue, hell you could use a garden hose, that doesn't mean it's a good idea.

Important to note that the OP is planning to run this line into another building, a detached garage! The idea that someone could possibly run over to the main 65' away and shut the gas off is wishful thinking.

A natural gas leak and explosion is like a bomb that could blow the building to splinters.

There is good reason that outdoor underground gas line can be HFPE plastic, and indoor lines are black iron heavy pipe or stainless steel.

I'm typically risk averse, but not w/ NG.
You make a good point about the length.

In my case, the jumper/hose portion is about 12' to the professionally installed black iron pipe with a shut off and the hose portion only runs outside for the last foot or so. Again, this is a temporary setup. I'm plenty risk averse, too, but I don't worry a bit about this short of a jumper in a temporary installation.

65' may be a different story depending on how the area is situated. And there may be a better solution to this problem.
 

GilaMinumBeer

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You make a good point about the length.

In my case, the jumper/hose portion is about 12' to the professionally installed black iron pipe with a shut off and the hose portion only runs outside for the last foot or so. Again, this is a temporary setup. I'm plenty risk averse, too, but I don't worry a bit about this short of a jumper in a temporary installation.

65' may be a different story depending on how the area is situated. And there may be a better solution to this problem.
I do something similar as you. I installed a shut-off and a commercial quick-connect off of the furnace feed in my garage. Went to a LPG/LNG dealer and had a custom made 12' "umbilical" made out of heavy-duty hose.

I did, however, have the shut-off and quick-connect inspected by the AHJ.
 

dcbc

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I should also mentioned I had a licensed plumber run all the gas connections on my brew stand. :)
 

wilserbrewer

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I should also mentioned I had a licensed plumber run all the gas connections on my brew stand. :)

Are you brewing inside or outside? A potential leak is far more dangerous inside imo as it allows the gas to potentially accumulate and go boom lol. As soon as you bring the temp connection inside another building it's a game changer for me.

Would I do it outdoors, idk maybe...a 100' roll of hdpe irrigation tubing is about 40 bucks. Would I advise someone to do it on a discussion forum. No.

I still think an electric extension cord makes more sense than a gas extension pipe.

I'm also bias in that I feel electric is better in many ways for homebrewing....
 

jammin

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With either electric OR gas, you should make sure your project is up to code, because your home owner's / renter's insurance will not protect you if it's not. In BOTH cases that means hiring someone to do it right.

Would anyone with an iota of common sense ever recommend a lay person wire 240V/30A, or plumb up natural gas to an accessory building by themselves? NO!
Ummm... duh?
 

dcbc

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Are you brewing inside or outside? A potential leak is far more dangerous inside imo as it allows the gas to potentially accumulate and go boom lol. As soon as you bring the temp connection inside another building it's a game changer for me.

Would I do it outdoors, idk maybe...a 100' roll of hdpe irrigation tubing is about 40 bucks. Would I advise someone to do it on a discussion forum. No.

I still think an electric extension cord makes more sense than a gas extension pipe.

I'm also bias in that I feel electric is better in many ways for homebrewing....
Edge of the garage with the garage door wide open. So, technically, inside, but the brewstand is basically 8" inside the opening. Ventilation is not an issue. The hose connects to a stub behind some bushes just out of frame. The stub is on the exterior wall of the garage. As you can see, the hose sits on the outer edge of the slab up until it connects to the stand.

If my driveway weren't sloped downward for 25 yards, I'd probably roll it into the driveway. But I'm not worried about it. Maybe if there's a leak, the gas will meander on down the hill. :)

 

dcbc

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That looks good :)
Thanks. I'm about to make my first change since 2012 and add manifolds on each side of the pump to eliminate having to move hoses during the brew. That, plus QDs on the garden hose fittings should make my life slightly easier once per month.
 

day_trippr

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[...]Would I do it outdoors, idk maybe...a 100' roll of hdpe irrigation tubing is about 40 bucks. Would I advise someone to do it on a discussion forum. No. [...]
I was thinking the same two things.
I mean, it's ~.4 psi NG. BFD...

Cheers! :D
 

dmark1867

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Hey what did you end up getting/doing?
I am in a similar situation but needing it to power a NG portable generator for a couple of hours a couple times per year.
 
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