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Something Quick for an impatient Newbie

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Chicagobrewer

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I've got a beer in one of my two secondary's and I really want to get something in the primary that might not take so long. Are there any styles of beers that brew quicker then others?

In my secondary is a Franzikaner clone. It was a mini mash boil so I'm comfortable with that but from beginning to end it's going to be 6 weeks according to the recipe I was giving. 1 week primary, 2 weeks secondary, 3 weeks bottle conditioning.

Is there anything I can have from boil to glass in say 3 weeks?

Thanks for your help, and please be kind I'm new here.

Edd
 

jmo88

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search "10der and mild" . Also, Hefes are done in about 10 days and bottle condition in about 2 weeks, generally.
 

rsmith179

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Man... It's so hard for us guys who don't keg to get a beer done in 3 weeks flat. I agree that a hefe is probably your best bet as they taste mighty fine young. The desired carbonation or head retention might not be there yet at that young. I think the quickest I would ever turn a beer around is 4 weeks when bottling.
 
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Chicagobrewer

Chicagobrewer

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yeah, I think it will have to be 4 weeks. I'm just excited and I want to have something to drink other then store beer.

Edd
 

mahilly

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Also, Hefes are done in about 10 days and bottle condition in about 2 weeks, generally.
I will bottle my hefe this weekend after 4 weeks in primary. I understand extra time on the yeast cake is good for other beers, so I just assumed the same was true for hefe's. True? Or am I unnecessarily postponing my enjoyment of this beer?
 

jmo88

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I will bottle my hefe this weekend after 4 weeks in primary. I understand extra time on the yeast cake is good for other beers, so I just assumed the same was true for hefe's. True? Or am I unnecessarily postponing my enjoyment of this beer?
Yup. You can leave it in for cleaning up diacetyl and to flocculate. Hefe yeast are low flocculating so they cleanup quicker due to the suspension and you don't have to wait for clarity. Four weeks is fine. It'll taste different. Not bad, just different. IMO hefes are best enjoyed young.
 
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Light styles with low OG and lower hop rate. These will ferment faster and have less need of mellowing (marrying) of hop flavors etc. (No Belgians! or double IPA's!)

If not a heffe, then use a yeast that attenuates fast. I just used mauri on a 1.062 OG and it was done fermenting in 3 days. (Note: that is not a guideline, just an example and I let it go much longer than that). Still I would not do a non-heffe beer in less than 14 days (plus bottling time). Even with heffes, I find the flavor is better if it goes the standard conditioning time. Some disagree on that point.

If you keg then the fastest I've ever done a beer was 8 days, but I filtered then kegged it and was drinking it 10 days from brew to glass (well I was drinking it in 7 but it tasted better after 10).

A little known fact is that many micros filter/bottle beers 10-14 days post brew day. This is mainly do to storage issues. Hard to keep up to demand when you only have so many hectoliters (or barrels for you Americans) room in your conditioning tanks. I think this is why some micros product tends to decline in quality whence they popularity.
 
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