So I planted them; now how long?

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HoppyDaze

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Planted two cascades, a centinnial, a saaz and a willamette yesterday and was wandering when I should see them sprouting? I live in Willamette Valley and naturally get a ton of water this time of year. I dug holes and put composed in the bottom of the holes and mixed top soil towards the top of the hole. They are all under about three inches of top soil. It should be ideal growing conditions for Hops.

The Willamette rhizome was planted in half barrel mixed with dirt in my yard, compost and potting soil. This one and the saaz one both had over five shoots so I expect them to be a bit bigger than the other at least in the initial year.
 

Evan!

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Depends on how healthy they were, but I would surely not expect any kind of cone yield this year at all. Maybe a few small cones, but nothing substantial. Depending on the weather, I'd guess you'll see growth within a month, though.
 

McKBrew

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So I planted them; now how long?

They can grow up to 20' or more. :D



Just kidding.

It took about 3 weeks or so until my first year rhizome started to sprout, I planted in the beginning of April last year. This year the same rhizome already has 18 shoots coming out the top.

Don't plan on a big harvest this year, I ended up with .3 oz of dried fuggles last year, and yes I did use them anyway.
 

TwoHeadsBrewing

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I planted hops for the first time last year. My soil sucks...rocky with clay and pretty bad drainage. So, I built up a 10" planter box for them and was surprised that I actually got quite a few hops the first year. I planted in late February and saw the first little sprouts in mid-March. The sprouts didn't grow much until the weather was consistently over 80F every day. The REAL growth didn't start until it was over 90F every day. At that point, no joke, the bines were growing 10" every day! I harvested the hops in late July, which I found out was about 2 weeks too early. Around here, mid to late August is perfect and will help the hops cure a bit more. Not sure what is "normal" for hop harvest yields, but here is what I got:

Centennials on the left, cascades on the right. I think the centennials tolerate the hot weather here a bit more.

 

humann_brewing

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I am getting excited, I have my hops and just need some time to plant them. I am thinking Sunday when I get back in town.

I was wondering I will be planting in 2 different areas for space reasons. One will get a fair amount more sun that the other and it is super hot here in the summer with a could never to be found. I have 5 varities, are they any of these that like the sun more than others?

Cascade x 2, cenntenial, chinook, willamette, and magnum
 

TwoHeadsBrewing

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Put cascades in the area that DOESN'T get super hot. I've got mine on a South-facing wall and they look pretty wilty when the temps get over 100F. The centennial on the other hand looks perky no matter what the weather is like. I've also heard Chinooks do very well in the heat.
 

humann_brewing

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Put cascades in the area that DOESN'T get super hot. I've got mine on a South-facing wall and they look pretty wilty when the temps get over 100F. The centennial on the other hand looks perky no matter what the weather is like. I've also heard Chinooks do very well in the heat.
That is good to know, I thought I heard the opposite that Cascades love the sun more than other varieties.

I will stick those close to the house where they only get the afternoon sun. The others will get maximum sun.
 

TwoHeadsBrewing

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That is good to know, I thought I heard the opposite that Cascades love the sun more than other varieties.

I will stick those close to the house where they only get the afternoon sun. The others will get maximum sun.
Oh they like sun, but just not the heat. If you can get them some shade in the afternoon when the temps are really soaring, then they will appreciate that. Mine seemed fine up until 2pm or so, then they would start to look tired as the temps increased.
 

humann_brewing

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Oh they like sun, but just not the heat. If you can get them some shade in the afternoon when the temps are really soaring, then they will appreciate that. Mine seemed fine up until 2pm or so, then they would start to look tired as the temps increased.
are you watering before they get dried out?

I have a drip irrigation system setup for this and plan on running a couple/few times a day to keep them moist. Is this a good idea?
 

TwoHeadsBrewing

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are you watering before they get dried out?

I have a drip irrigation system setup for this and plan on running a couple/few times a day to keep them moist. Is this a good idea?
Yes, 12 minutes @ 3am, 8 minutes @ 2pm. This keeps the soil moist but not soaked for the entire day.
 
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HoppyDaze

HoppyDaze

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So the temps got down to 36 last night and there was frost on my deck and grass...but no frost on the soil I any mulch areas in my yard. Nothing has sprouted yet; am I safe?
 

tac0meat

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I think you will be fine. From my understanding, it takes a hard freeze to affect them. If they are in the ground, I think they are safe as long as it doesnt dip below the upper 20s for an extended period of time
 

JamieT

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Planted my first 2 on sunday.. Cascades popped up today, NB's are just under the surface.
 
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