Snow Coming

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GilaMinumBeer

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Ugggg. I have vines nearly 2 foot tall and there is a snow storm coming that is expected to drag out through Saturday and dump 4 to 6 Inches of the white stuff.

I am thinking I'll just cut the vines. At this point wrapping everything would be a big chore and difficult at best to maintain through the storms (high winds).
 

McKBrew

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Honestly, I think you'd be fine leaving them out. When I noticed shoots poking through I was concerned, but I've had three or four frosts at least since then and them buggers are still growing.
 

McKBrew

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Still, the snow should act more as an insulator than anything. If you cut them back, wouldn't that keep that particular shoot from re-growing properly?
 

pen25

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that snow storm isnt going to stick. if you can get a tomatto cage and wrap it in plastic. if you need it to hold up to the wind then stake it and secure with wire. you will be fine. i hadnt heard anything except that maybe the far pan handle will get something.
 
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GilaMinumBeer

GilaMinumBeer

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Really? You don't think? Local weather is saying 4-6 in OKC Metro.

I have exactly one tomatoe cage and 10 plants at 2 foot. Mebe I'll rig something pinned to the drop lines.
 

Yooper

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According to my husband, the snow isn't a problem. It's cold that can zap them. Bob said that cutting the shoots will set the plant back, because it's already expended its energy to send those shoots up. Pile up leaves or straw, to insulate it as high as the growth if you can and hope for the best. If they die back, they do, but only if it's really cold with no insulation on them. They definitely have a fighting chance here.
 

Hopfarmer

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If they are 2nd year or older you should cut them back it is still to early Glen
 

Homercidal

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I am not sure a bit of snow is a problem. Yeah, cold might, but maybe cover with plastic.

But if a hop farmer says to cut them back, why not? It IS pretty early in the season (well, up here it is...)
 
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GilaMinumBeer

GilaMinumBeer

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Walp!

I did not cut them back and they grew, (I did wrap them in loose layers of plastic to protect them) cept' all the leaves of that part of the plant withered and faded. I figured no big deal, the tip still reached for the sky.

Fast forward through storms and lots, I mean lots, of high winds (35 to 70mph) and these now 10 foot plants are shragged, wind burned, and broken.

On the one hand, I am thinking to leave what is there and train new shoots for healthy growth,

or,

Let new shoots emerge, cut the old battered bines away, and start a new with healthy shoots. After all, it is still early in the season.

Whatcha' thank?
 

staffVAJoe

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I wish you guys (and gal) out west the best with the weather you are about to get. I'll dedicate my third beer I drink tonight towards the survival of your hops.

The first two will be because I deserve them after working outside in the 90 degree heat all day.

Enjoy the snow:ban:
 
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