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Slight buttery taste in my Lager

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Dave the Brewer

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My Light American Lager fermented for 2 weeks between 46-55 after the first two weeks I brought it up to 65 for 2 days. Then I brought it back down to 50 for a week. I started the lagering yesterday, its set at 34 right now. I just did a taste test, its nice and smooth very little after taste, except for the slight buttery taste. I took a small sip and I could taste it; the next sip I couldn't, I think because it was still in my mouth. I could drink it like this, but it would be perfect if it didn't have that taste. Of course its just at the beginning of the lagering, but does this taste hang in there, or will it go away? What is it from? I'm looking for my recipe, I can't find it!
Maybe I had too much on brew day...:drunk:
 

CarlLBC

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Diacetyl, do a search on it. you may need a rest or add more yeast, next time. You may get lucky and the yeast may clean it up over time.
 

BierMuncher

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That there is diacytal (sp).

Not a lager man so not sure what the mechanics of the diacytal rest are, but that should have cured it.

Other lagerererers on line may be able to help with some solutions.
 

Yooper

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I would bring it up to room temperature and keep it there until the diacetyl is gone. Maybe your diacetyl rest just wasn't long enough. I'd keep it at room temperature, then rack and start the secondary and then lagering.

You didn't mentioned if you're already racked. If you have, the yeast will have a harder time cleaning up the diacetyl. I assume you did, since you're ready to lager. Next time, make sure the diacetyl is gone before you rack, and it'll go alot easier.
 

Bobby_M

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A potential problem is that you executed the warm rest too late in the process. Most of the yeast may have started going dormant. That just means it needed to sit at 68 or so a little longer than 2 days. Now that you're in the lagering phase, you very little yeast to do the work so I'd recommend slowly raising the temp back up over a few days and keep it at room temp for a week. Then slowly back down to lager temps again. No one said it would be easy ;-)
 
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Dave the Brewer

Dave the Brewer

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Its already racked yes, I assumed the diacetyl was gone because I left it out at room temperature for a few days. I didn't know what let me know if it was gone or not. I just saw that it was very clear. I assumed it was ready for lagering. I was very surprised how well it tasted, besides the butter taste. I will take it out for a week then drop the temp back down for lagering for another month or so. I can do that!
Thanks guys, now if I could just find my recipe...
 

Yooper

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Dave the Brewer said:
Its already racked yes, I assumed the diacetyl was gone because I left it out at room temperature for a few days. I didn't know what let me know if it was gone or not. I just saw that it was very clear. I assumed it was ready for lagering. I was very surprised how well it tasted, besides the butter taste. I will take it out for a week then drop the temp back down for lagering for another month or so. I can do that!
Thanks guys, now if I could just find my recipe...
Yes, take it out and then try it after a few days. John Palmer has a really good "diacetyl test" in his book that involves boiling some of the beer to compare with nonboiled. It's really interesting, and probably would have been helpful for you a week ago!

After the diacetyl is gone, then you can slowly reduce the temperature until you're lagering.
 

Got Trub?

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Was there a reason your fermentation temps varied so widely? That may have contributed to more diacetyl as it stresses the yeast. Pitching the right amount of yeast and pitching cold is supposed to help prevent it. I'm no expert though as this is my first season brewing lagers, hopefully those with more experience will continue to chime in...

GT
 
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