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Slight Banana Flavor from Stressing the Yeast - American Lager Yeast

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Omahawk

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So I'm trying to help a friend clone Coors Light (no one is perfect, don't judge.) He enjoys all styles of beer, just has a soft spot for Coors Light.

I found this interview with MillerCoors the brew master. millercoors brewmaster interview

Coors Light has a slight banana flavor, and that’s from the yeast being “slightly stressed, slightly on the edge,” Dr. Ryder explains. It’s not an overwhelming flavor, but definitely part of the Coors Light taste.

Lots of interesting information in the interview, honestly.

I'm basically assuming this is a 75% 2-row, 25% corn recipe with American Lager yeast.

Any idea how to "slightly stress" the yeast for a banana flavor? Underpitch? Don't aerate?
 
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Omahawk

Omahawk

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I'm assuming the OG is somewhere around 1.04, if that helps.
 

Dcpcooks

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I suspect they rely on pitch rates and a warmer than average fermentation temp for the strain. It's 6 row not 2row and some corn (I'd start at 10-15%) to boost gravity.

The 6 row/rice/ underpitch is the key to it in my opinion
 

Adnams

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I have used Mangrove jcks Belgian wheat beer a couple of times, that has left a banana tinge to it
 

bucketnative

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I'm basically assuming this is a 75% 2-row, 25% corn recipe with American Lager yeast.
From the Miller Coors blog that you linked to: "Coors Light and Miller Lite each use a combination of pale and crystal barley malts."

Probably a small fraction of crystal, and they don't mention the adjuncts.

See here: https://www.millercoors.com/sites/millercoors/files/MillerCoors Nutritionals_1_0.pdf

"Coors Light: Water, barley malt, corn syrup (dextrose), yeast and hops"

Somewhere else, I saw that MillerCoors stated that they do not use high fructose corn syrup, but rather a brewing extract from corn.
 
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Omahawk

Omahawk

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I suspect they rely on pitch rates and a warmer than average fermentation temp for the strain. It's 6 row not 2row and some corn (I'd start at 10-15%) to boost gravity.

The 6 row/rice/ underpitch is the key to it in my opinion
Yeah, I'd heard 6-row in the past too, but the brewer says it's 2-row "Moravian" barley.

I'm wondering what a slightly warm pitch for American Lager yeast is? 58-60 F?

Thanks.
 
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Omahawk

Omahawk

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From the Miller Coors blog that you linked to: "Coors Light and Miller Lite each use a combination of pale and crystal barley malts."

Probably a small fraction of crystal, and they don't mention the adjuncts.

See here: https://www.millercoors.com/sites/millercoors/files/MillerCoors Nutritionals_1_0.pdf

"Coors Light: Water, barley malt, corn syrup (dextrose), yeast and hops"

Somewhere else, I saw that MillerCoors stated that they do not use high fructose corn syrup, but rather a brewing extract from corn.
I saw the crystal malt comment, too - I chose to ignore it,since I'm guessing it's in the neighborhood of 1% since I can't taste it. I might throw in an ounce of C-10L.

in terms of the corn extract, I was assuming flaked corn would have the same taste. Maybe not? Not sure what a good substitute for the mysterious corn extract would be.
 
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Omahawk

Omahawk

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I have used Mangrove jcks Belgian wheat beer a couple of times, that has left a banana tinge to it
I've never used their strains before. I'll have to look into it. I'm hoping for the classic lager finish on this.
 
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Omahawk

Omahawk

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I always thought hefeweizen yeast fermented warm is what gives banana flavor?
That's my understanding with that strain as well. The warmer the ferment, the more the hefe flavors.
 
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Omahawk

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Update. He brewed it with Kolsch yeast at ale temps and it was really clean and on point. Tasted just like a well made light American lager. Not my favorite but it was sure easy to drink.
 

SEndorf

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Yes. Hefes such as WLP300 fermented warm brings out the banana. Fermented cooler brings out the cloves.
 
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