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simple biab calculator question

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newnick

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Somewhere between .25 and .5 gallon depending on things like using alot of hops. If you just throw them in the wort they will end up in the fermentor.
If you use a hop bag they won't.
 

newnick

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I bottled up a batch today and ended up with about .75 gals. of trub. This is the most I've had on a batch. I used a low floculating yeast and some adjuncts and had a problem draining my boil kettle so had to pour it all in the fermentor is all I can figure.
 

DurtyChemist

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It CAN vary batch to batch and it WILL vary if you dump everything in from the boil or let stuff settle and siphon from the top or have a setup like mine where the "deadspace" just happens to hold about 90% of the trub.

I just washed my yeast from a recent batch where I let it sit overnight before putting everything into the fermentor. I boiled 1 pint of water and had maybe 4 ounces of beer left on top of the trub/yeast, well everything I rinsed fit into 1 and a half mason jars.

Jut measure it from 6 batches and you'll get a good number for an average/standard.
 

calvey

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Just to be clear, trub in the mashing phase refers to the liquid left in your boil kettle along with hops and break material after you complete your normal transfer procedure to the fermenter. Yeast and flocculation and all that are an entirely different phase and have nothing to do with your water calculations.
 

Foosier

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Calvey, Not sure I agree. Since the calculator is asking how much beer you want to end up with, the trub loss is actually a calculation of any loss in the system. I could be wrong but this is how I use it and I hit my finished beer volumes right on.
 

wilserbrewer

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Yes I agree, call it what you want, but you will have losses for both the trub in the boil kettle, and the yeast cake in the fermenter. If you ferment everything from the kettle, the losses in the yeast cake will be greater.
 

mrgstiffler

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Calvey, Not sure I agree. Since the calculator is asking how much beer you want to end up with, the trub loss is actually a calculation of any loss in the system. I could be wrong but this is how I use it and I hit my finished beer volumes right on.
Yes, this is correct. People usually end up with a lot more loss during fermentation than they expect. The finished beer field is how much drinkable beer you want to end up with. Fermentation trub is how much you leave in the fermenter. I assume that most people will try and transfer as much as possible from the kettle to the fermenter. Kettle trub is calculated based on hop absorption. It's not perfect but it tends to get pretty close.
 

newnick

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I've had good sucess using it many times but I find it gives me about .5 gal. to much water to start with. I assume it's the numbers I put in or my system, not the calculator it self. Either way, it's a great help.
 

mrgstiffler

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I've had good sucess using it many times but I find it gives me about .5 gal. to much water to start with. I assume it's the numbers I put in or my system, not the calculator it self. Either way, it's a great help.
Everyone has a different process. You can't really compare how hard one person squeezes the bag compared to another. The calculator assumes no squeezing. Just a lift and drain. I've been meaning to update it with some "fudge" numbers so that people can dial in their systems a bit.
 
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