Quantcast

Session ale question...

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

alane1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2012
Messages
931
Reaction score
259
Location
South East Massachusetts
For my next brew I was planning on an ordinary bitter. What is the best way for an all-grain batch, sparge full volume, or use equal parts mash and sparge water and top up in the kettle? This is for a 5.5 gal batch and I was planning on a 1.25qt/1lb ratio

Grist:
6lbs. two row
1lb English crystal 60
 

duboman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2011
Messages
6,366
Reaction score
517
Location
Glenview
alane1 said:
For my next brew I was planning on an ordinary bitter. What is the best way for an all-grain batch, sparge full volume, or use equal parts mash and sparge water and top up in the kettle? This is for a 5.5 gal batch and I was planning on a 1.25qt/1lb ratio Grist: 6lbs. two row 1lb English crystal 60
I would do 1.5qts/lb mash, single infusion and a single sparge assuming you can fit the volume and do a full boil, also assuming you can do a full boil
 
OP
alane1

alane1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2012
Messages
931
Reaction score
259
Location
South East Massachusetts
I was concerned about tannin extraction for such a small grist, maybe treating sparge water with phosphoric acid would help?
 

duboman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2011
Messages
6,366
Reaction score
517
Location
Glenview
Tannin extraction is a concern when you do not maintain proper pH of the mash. If you can keep the pH in the 5.2-5.4 range you should not have issues with tannins, regardless of grist size. You are also not using any roasted or really dark grains which minimize this issue also, not entirely but some.

Treating with acid may or may not benefit, it depends on your existing pH and what the grist alters it to be.
 

LovesIPA

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 18, 2012
Messages
1,517
Reaction score
206
Location
Sacramento
For a really light grain bill like that, I would sparge until the runnings hit 1.010. Then add top off water, if any. I find that even on smaller grain bills, the last runnings are usually still higher than 1.020.
 
OP
alane1

alane1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2012
Messages
931
Reaction score
259
Location
South East Massachusetts
I've never really had problems with tannins with my water(hard well), or mash ph but I've only really done medium to big beers. The session beer is kind of new territory for me. Thanks for all the replies, it all looks like solid advice. Cheers.
 

mjohnson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2010
Messages
580
Reaction score
34
Location
New Jersey
For small grists, I often do full volume mashes. Kind of like BIAB without the bag. And in a mash tun.
 
OP
alane1

alane1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2012
Messages
931
Reaction score
259
Location
South East Massachusetts
For small grists, I often do full volume mashes. Kind of like BIAB without the bag. And in a mash tun.
that sounds kind of cool, I like the idea of getting full kettle volume without having to fuss with sparge gravity/PH. Do you mash with full volume or do you hold back a few quarts for a mash out?
 

mjohnson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2010
Messages
580
Reaction score
34
Location
New Jersey
I just mash with the whole volume and start heating the boil as soon as I begin the lauter. I skip the mashout. You may lose a few points of efficiency this way (just cause you aren't sparging). I usually plan on 70% and get it. The first time you try this, you might want to add a little extra base grain just in case. You can always dilute a bit if need be.

I really like doing this. It makes for a really easy brew day. Dough balls are almost impossible to get. The mash temps are more consistent because you have a lot more thermal mass than if you tried to mash that little amount of grain normally.
 
OP
alane1

alane1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2012
Messages
931
Reaction score
259
Location
South East Massachusetts
I just mash with the whole volume and start heating the boil as soon as I begin the lauter. I skip the mashout. You may lose a few points of efficiency this way (just cause you aren't sparging). I usually plan on 70% and get it. The first time you try this, you might want to add a little extra base grain just in case. You can always dilute a bit if need be.

I really like doing this. It makes for a really easy brew day. Dough balls are almost impossible to get. The mash temps are more consistent because you have a lot more thermal mass than if you tried to mash that little amount of grain normally.
I took your advice, I went from 6lbs to 7lbs pale but went darker with the crystal to 70L and mashed with 7 gal. (Mash ph was 5.5). I collected 6 gal. of wort and topped off another gal. in the kettle to get 5.5 gal. post boil at 1.039. Great advice, Cheers!!!
 
Top