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JustMrWill

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I have tried searching this...and can't seem to find the info I am looking for...so, sorry if this had been discussed a million times already....

I normally ferment in a 6 gallon TruBrew bucket then transfer to a 6.5 gallon carboy to condition. I then transfer to my 5 gallon cornie and carbonate with CO2 tank.

I have recently picked up a bunch more kegs and another 6.5 carboy so I was thinking that I want to change out the process a bit....here is what I was thinking:

Ferment in 6.5 carboy then condition in cornelius keg. This way I can have 2 (or three if I still use bucket) primaries and up to 6 conditioning (less if I have any on tap). I don't bottle unless I am giving some away (or need an empty keg).

Now for my questions:

Should I set up an airlock on the kegs or seal it and let it pressurize?

What is the pros/cons of conditioning under pressure?

If I conditioned under pressure, do I need to monitor the pressure?

Would you suggest that I transfer to a clean keg before dispensing (either airlock or pressurized)?

Thanks in advance - I am sure your answers will spanw yet more questions...:eek:

-JMW
 

Bombo80

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personally, I would feel better about having an airlock on my secondary. You can condition in your kegs, but I would get additional lids and drill them, so they can accept a stopper and airlock. I just found some on ebay.

If I were doing this, I would then setup an inline filter system, and then filter the beer into another keg, before drinking. You are still going to get a fair amount of sediment.

Just my opinion on this
 

SuperiorBrew

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JustMrWill said:
Now for my questions:

Should I set up an airlock on the kegs or seal it and let it pressurize?

What is the pros/cons of conditioning under pressure?

If I conditioned under pressure, do I need to monitor the pressure?

Would you suggest that I transfer to a clean keg before dispensing (either airlock or pressurized)?

Thanks in advance - I am sure your answers will spanw yet more questions...:eek:

-JMW
If you let the fermentation finish before transfering it to the corny you do not need an airlock, I once transfered the wrong beer, it was only after 7 days and it was not quite done so i rigged up an airlock with some stuff I had laying around


I have done it both ways, you will get a little sediment in your first glass or two if you dont
 

EdWort

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You might want to check into www.kegpasties.com as these things are pretty clean solution for secondary fermenting in a corny with an airlock.



Take out the poppet of your Gas In post and then this silicone keg pasty fits over the post and will hold an airlock.

It's a pretty simple solution without needing another ball lock connector.
 

david_42

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I figure there's a relief valve, so why worry about it? If I'm expecting any more fermentation, I have a pressure gage connected to a gas connector that I can attach.
 

abracadabra

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I believe an air lock on a cornie keg used as secondary is a complete waste of time and money. I secondary in my cornies without an airlock.

In the first place most cornie kegs are capable of holding up to 130 PSI. I seriously doubt you'd build up 30 psi. But if you're still concerned just pop the pressure relief valve every day or so.

Edit: to answer your other question I read recently about a guy that fremented under pressure the entire time and said his beer was so good doing it that way he intends to continue.
 

abracadabra

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I forgot to mention about transfering. Some people cut off the dip tubes a half inch or so. Some others just bend the tube up a little.

I would transfer if I planned to take the keg to a party or transport it somewhere to keep the sediment from getting back into suspension other wise I just toss out the first 8-12 oz if it has sediment in it.
 

SuperiorBrew

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abracadabra said:
I believe an air lock on a cornie keg used as secondary is a complete waste of time and money. I secondary in my cornies without an airlock.

In the first place most cornie kegs are capable of holding up to 130 PSI. I seriously doubt you'd build up 30 psi. But if you're still concerned just pop the pressure relief valve every day or so.

Edit: to answer your other question I read recently about a guy that fremented under pressure the entire time and said his beer was so good doing it that way he intends to continue.
+1

I only used the airlock once because I didnt think it was finished fermenting. Now i never use them.

Closed-system pressurized fermentation technique!
 
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JustMrWill

JustMrWill

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Thanks for all the replies!

So...if I transfer from one keg to another, should I just use CO2 to push it or do you recommend siphoning it?

I assume that if I use CO2...I should pour off the first few onces that will have sediment?

I have my first lager that is almost ready to be moved from the primary (bubbles in airlock are almost non-existant..gonna take a gravity ready tonight and then again tomorrow). I would like to use the cornelius keg for this batch and want to make the "best" choice".

-JMW
 

abracadabra

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I'd take advantage of the ability to transfer using CO2. The less you expose your beer to the air the better in my estimation.

If you haven't cut or bent the dip tube up then pour a beer into a glass and see how it looks, when it looks clear then start your transfer.
 
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