Secondary fermentation question

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

michaelpeach76

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2011
Messages
81
Reaction score
0
When ever I normally go into dry hopping or adding aroma with other ingredients I usually first rack to a secondary (glass carboy). 4 days ago I brewed a smoked vanilla porter and will enlist secondary fermentation for vanilla bean and oak chips. Question is; can I leave the wort in my primary fermentor and do the secondary aromatics there...just open the lid after a week and add my aromatics, leave for a week then rack to bottling bucket? With the exception of adding the aromatic ingredients I want to leave the wort as un-disturbed as possible until bottling.
 

RM-MN

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Nov 26, 2010
Messages
14,668
Reaction score
5,505
Location
Solway
When ever I normally go into dry hopping or adding aroma with other ingredients I usually first rack to a secondary (glass carboy). 4 days ago I brewed a smoked vanilla porter and will enlist secondary fermentation for vanilla bean and oak chips. Question is; can I leave the wort in my primary fermentor and do the secondary aromatics there...just open the lid after a week and add my aromatics, leave for a week then rack to bottling bucket? With the exception of adding the aromatic ingredients I want to leave the wort as un-disturbed as possible until bottling.
Many of us do most of our brewing in the primary including dry hopping. The exceptions are for long term aging of a barleywine and things that are added that might get lost in the trub layer. Your vanilla beans and oak chips could be some of the exceptions.:rockin:
 

vindee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2011
Messages
266
Reaction score
32
Location
Lake Tapps
I usually do around three weeks in the primary. When fermentation looks to be done, (around a week into it) I add my dry hops then without racking to a clean carboy.
Great aroma and hop flavor without running any additional risk of exposing the beer to the elements.
 
Top