Scottish Ale

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Adam78K

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2009
Messages
327
Reaction score
2
Location
Seattle
Let me know what you guys think for this one, kind of just made this one up on the fly, going for a partial mash and wanted a nice smokey, malty flavor to this one with low hop and bitterness smell.

Scotish Ale

7lbs Light/Pale Malt Extract Syrup

1lb Peat Smoked Malt

.25lb Cara-Pils(Dextrin) Malt

.25lb Canadian Honey Malt

.25lb Biscuit Malt

.25lb Crystal 60L Malt

.25lb Special B

Irish Yeast

1oz Willamette(30)
1oz Willamette(5)

Also wanted to add some toasted oak chips into my fermentor after all the airlock activity has seized, about 2 oz's of chips. What do you guys think?
 

Freezeblade

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 25, 2008
Messages
1,415
Reaction score
46
Location
Oakland, California
WAY WAY WAY too much peat smoked malt. scale that back to like...4 ounces, maybe, and I think you meant .25# not .25oz on everything else.
 

carbon111

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 18, 2009
Messages
555
Reaction score
7
Location
Pacific NW
Even 2 oz of peat malt is a lot. That's the most I ever put in my Scotch Ale.

Most Scottish Ales don't have any, they rely on the yeast to give it that smoky overtone.
 

Brewsmith

Home brewing moogerfooger
Joined
Aug 10, 2005
Messages
6,268
Reaction score
137
Location
Torrance, CA
Cut the peat out and use more crystal, maybe 0.5 lb of each 60L and Special B, although, Crystal 120 or 150 would maybe be a better grain choice instead of the Special B.
 

carbon111

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 18, 2009
Messages
555
Reaction score
7
Location
Pacific NW
FWIW, I've got a Scottish fermenting now that looks like this:

5.5 gallons, 1.054 OG, 29 IBUs

4 lbs 2-Row Pale Malt
3 lbs Light DME
1 lb Crystal 60L
4 oz Roasted Barley
4 oz Toasted Malt (350 F 15 mnutes)
2 oz Peated Malt

2 oz Willamette 60 minutes (4.8 AA)
2 oz Willamette 5 minutes

Wyeast Scottish Ale (1728)
 

Brewsmith

Home brewing moogerfooger
Joined
Aug 10, 2005
Messages
6,268
Reaction score
137
Location
Torrance, CA
My Scottish that I'm drinking right now...

#91 80 Shilling Bagpipes

A ProMash Recipe Report

Recipe Specifics
----------------
Batch Size (Gal): 5.50 Wort Size (Gal): 5.50
Total Grain (Lbs): 8.92
Anticipated OG: 1.048 Plato: 11.97
Anticipated SRM: 15.6
Anticipated IBU: 20.1
Brewhouse Efficiency: 80 %
Wort Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Formulas Used
-------------
Brewhouse Efficiency and Predicted Gravity based on Method #1, Potential Used.
Final Gravity Calculation Based on Points.
Hard Value of Sucrose applied. Value for recipe: 46.2100 ppppg
Yield Type used in Gravity Prediction: Fine Grind Dry Basis.
Color Formula Used: Morey
Hop IBU Formula Used: Rager

Grain/Extract/Sugar
% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
84.0 7.50 lbs. Pale Malt(2-row) Great Britain 1.038 3
5.6 0.50 lbs. Munich Malt(light) America 1.033 10
4.5 0.40 lbs. Crystal 150L Great Britain 1.033 150
4.5 0.40 lbs. Crystal 60L America 1.034 60
1.4 0.13 lbs. Roasted Barley America 1.028 450
Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.

Hops
Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
0.95 oz. Goldings - B.C. Whole 5.20 20.1 60 min.

Yeast
-----
White Labs WLP028 Edinburgh Ale

Mash Schedule
-------------
Mash Type: Single Step
Grain Lbs: 8.92
Water Qts: 12.00 - Before Additional Infusions
Water Gal: 3.00 - Before Additional Infusions
Qts Water Per Lbs Grain: 1.34 - Before Additional Infusions
Saccharification Rest Temp : 156 Time: 60
Mash-out Rest Temp : 168 Time: 15
Sparge Temp : 170 Time: 30
Total Mash Volume Gal: 3.71 - Dough-In Infusion Only
All temperature measurements are degrees Fahrenheit.
 

camiller

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2007
Messages
1,907
Reaction score
49
Location
Omaha, NE
+∞ on the too much peated malt! I was trying a fake Scottish (using dry yeast and peated malt to get the smoky overtones) and 2oz. of peated malt in a 5 gallon batch was still way too much! If I were to try it again I'd probably go 1oz.
 
OP
A

Adam78K

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2009
Messages
327
Reaction score
2
Location
Seattle
Ok so if I back to peat to about 4 oz will be good? What about the other ingredents?
 

carbon111

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 18, 2009
Messages
555
Reaction score
7
Location
Pacific NW
I definately wouldn't go over 2 oz of peated malt in a five gallon batch. As you can see by other people's answers, the consensus is to use none or just a tiny bit.

The other ingredients look good - though you may want to try just a touch of roasted barley...though probably not more than two or three ounces.
 

Brewsmith

Home brewing moogerfooger
Joined
Aug 10, 2005
Messages
6,268
Reaction score
137
Location
Torrance, CA
I still say ditch the smoke alltogether.

At most, wave the smoked malt over the mash tun. That should give you the maximum smoke character found in a traditional Scottish Ale. ;)
 

elkdog

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 30, 2007
Messages
1,081
Reaction score
12
Location
Chapel Hill
I still say ditch the smoke alltogether.

At most, wave the smoked malt over the mash tun. That should give you the maximum smoke character found in a traditional Scottish Ale. ;)
Funny thing is, Jamil sort of has a spiel about not putting peat in Scottish Ale. I think he says it three times in his blurb on the style in his book. I had no idea what he was talking about, as I'd not had a smoky Scottish Ale before (though I love love love Scottish Ales). Then I tried one, and even though I like peated scotch quite a bit, I thought the peat just seemed out of place in the beer, almost like drinking from an ash tray. Some say that a nice clean fermentation with just a kiss of roasted malt (chocolate, pale chocolate, roasted barley- I've seen all of those in recipe) will suggest the smokiness. Makes sense to me.

So yeah, + a lot on ditching the peated malt.
 
OP
A

Adam78K

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2009
Messages
327
Reaction score
2
Location
Seattle
What flavor does raunch malt and the other malt bring to the table?
 

Brewsmith

Home brewing moogerfooger
Joined
Aug 10, 2005
Messages
6,268
Reaction score
137
Location
Torrance, CA
Rauch malt is beechwood smoked. It smells and tastes like the smoke, like it has been over an open fire. A strong smoke character is reminicent of barbecue, although the last smoked beer I did, my friends nicknamed it "bacon beer". Smoke for bacon is usually hickory or maple. Get your hands on a Rauchbier. Schlenkerla can be found in better stores. That will give you and idea of what a strong smoke character is like.

rauchbier.jpg
 
OP
A

Adam78K

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2009
Messages
327
Reaction score
2
Location
Seattle
Ok newely revised recipe what you guys think?

Scotish Ale

7lbs Light/Pale Malt Extract Syrup

.50lb Rauch Malt

.25lb Cara-Pils(Dextrin) Malt

.25lb Canadian Honey Malt

.25lb Biscuit Malt

.50lb Crystal 60L Malt

.50lb Crystal 120L Malt

Irish Yeast

1oz Willamette(30)
1oz Willamette(5)

2 oz toasted oak wood chips
 

Brewsmith

Home brewing moogerfooger
Joined
Aug 10, 2005
Messages
6,268
Reaction score
137
Location
Torrance, CA
Rauch malt is not the same as peated malt. You will need to use more than 2 oz. to get a smokey character, maybe at least a half pound to be subtle. The smoked porters, similar to Alaskan Brewing, can be around 20% rauch malt.
 

B-Dub

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2007
Messages
557
Reaction score
13
Location
Central Coast
I am one for leaving the smoke out.

But if you are dead set on it use the rauch malt or the apple smoked briess.

Briess Malt & Ingredients Co.: Smoked Malt

CHARACTERISTICS AND APPLICATIONS
�� Briess Smoked Malt is produced using cherry wood.
�� The result is a unique, enzyme-active specialty malt that contributes an intense smoke, smooth, sweet, smoky flavor.
�� Use in a variety of beer styles including:
• Scottish Ales
• Smoked Beer
• Porters
• Bamberger Beer
• Rauch Bock
�� Recommended beginning usage rates:
• 5-10% – Noticeable smoke character in lighter styles such as Scottish Ales and Oktoberfests
• 10-20% – Pronounced smoke character in lighter styles like Scottish Ales and Oktoberfests
• 30-60% – Noticeable to pronounced smoke character in darker styles like Stouts and Porters
• Briess Smoked Malt delivers intense smoked flavor. We recommend limiting usage to 60% of the grist.

Weyermann® http://www.weyermann.de/eng/produkte.asp?idkat=16&umenue=yes&idmenue=37&sprache=2
Smoked Malt

* Scottish Ale
* Smoked Beer
* Lager
* Kellerbier
* Specialty Beers
Bamberger Rauchbier
* Alaskan Ale

up to 100 %

* Smoked flavor and aroma, typical for this classic German style
 

carbon111

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 18, 2009
Messages
555
Reaction score
7
Location
Pacific NW
K last edit what you guys think?
Looks pretty good to me, though I'd leave out the Oak and use a Scottish Ale yeast.

If you leave out the smoke altogether this time, you'll have a baseline for how "smoky" it will get from the yeast and malt alone.
 
Top