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MULE

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Anyone want to talk scotch?

Good.... not so good..... whatever...
 
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MULE

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I just had some Macallan's 15yr with a short Monte Cirsto. Very good indeed.
 
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I enjoy a wide variety of scotch, but my favorite has got to be Macallan. The 12 year old is great, the 18 sublime. I find the 21 year old to be almost TOO smooth, in that some of the complexities that make scotch so enjoyable have almost faded away. It's just as well, as I certainly can't afford it anyhow!

+1 on the cigar, they are a natural companion to a good scotch. Still, I find I'm smoking fewer and fewer...not as much opportunity these days.
 

EdWort

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I love the peaty smokey flavor of Islay scotches, but a 15 year old MacCallan is mighty tasty too.

Another awesome favorite is Isle of Jura Superstition. Very nice and highly recommended.
 
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MULE

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BlindLemonLars said:
+1 on the cigar, they are a natural companion to a good scotch. Still, I find I'm smoking fewer and fewer...not as much opportunity these days.

100% agree. But I find it hard to enjoy a good smoke with my little ones running around.

My fav scotch so far is Glenfiddich 12yr. To me, it is ole faithful. The Speyburn 10yr is the best bang for your buck. Unless, you want a blend like JWB.

IMHO,
Russ
 
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MULE

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EdWort said:
I love the peaty smokey flavor of Islay scotches, but a 15 year old MacCallan is mighty tasty too.

Another awesome favorite is Isle of Jura Superstition. Very nice and highly recommended.
Hard to find?
 

EdWort

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MULE said:
Hard to find?

Yeah, I used to buy it Duty Free in Schipol Amsterdam till the dollar fell through the floor.

I special order it now from my good friend at the neighborhood liquor store.
 
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MULE

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EdWort said:
Yeah, I used to buy it Duty Free in Schipol Amsterdam till the dollar fell through the floor.

I special order it now from my good friend at the neighborhood liquor store.
That sounds real nice. I hope I can get my hands on a bottle some day.

I'm going to pick up a bottle of Aberlour Abundah next week. Any thoughts?
 

EdWort

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I've had Aberlour before. It was tasty. I need to find my Scotch collection picture and post it. It was a good one.
 

Thirdeye

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Im getting into Scotch. Almost finished with my first ever bottle. 12 yr Glenlevit. A friend of mine recommended the Isle of Jura as well. How much does a bottle of that stuff run? I might try it next.
 
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MULE

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Thirdeye said:
Im getting into Scotch. Almost finished with my first ever bottle. 12 yr Glenlevit. A friend of mine recommended the Isle of Jura as well. How much does a bottle of that stuff run? I might try it next.
I like 12yr Glenlevit for the flower/wet finish.
 

EdWort

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Thirdeye said:
Im getting into Scotch. Almost finished with my first ever bottle. 12 yr Glenlevit. A friend of mine recommended the Isle of Jura as well. How much does a bottle of that stuff run? I might try it next.

I love Glenlevit too! A great and tasty scotch.

I paid $36 for a liter of Isle of Jura Superstition.
 
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MULE

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EdWort said:
I love Glenlevit too! A great and tasty scotch.

I paid $36 for a liter of Isle of Jura Superstition.
What does it taste like?
 

EdWort

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MULE said:
What does it taste like?
I had a blind scotch tasting at my house (two guest were English, another Scottish) and out of 8 tastings, the Superstition was picked as the favorite.
Two styles of spirit from Jura distillery are combined to produce this stunning, beautifully balanced single malt. Heavily peated younger malt and older Jura making a great alternative for Islay fans, in sexy packaging too!

Whisky Magazine Tasting Notes

Nose: Immediate peatiness.Turfy rather than marine. Phenolics, macadamia nut, horchata. Light meaty note. Sweet centre.
Palate: Light smoke lying above firm, young grassy, notes. beech nuts, heather. Silky feel.
Finish: Good length. Drifting smoke.
0010000016727_XL.JPG
 
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Bowmore has got to be my overall favorite. Anything from the Legend to the 18 year. (prefer the price of legend to the 18...:D )

As For McAllen....I find a nice glass of Cask Strength reminds me a lot of sucking on a cinnamon jaw breaker. VERY NICE

GlenLevett, Glenfiddig...both standards in my Cab.

Regular Whiskey...Gentleman Jack. (Makers Mark Does Not Count) That's it.
I've sure wanted to try the Colorado Whiskey. It's made next door to the Flying Dog Brewery...In Fact, The Flying Dog Ferments the wash for the Colorado Whiskey.
 
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MULE

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Kahuna.. true......

Thanks for the chat. I have to get uo with the kids..... Guten Abend
 
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The Macallan 12 yr is my standard. I love that stuff. 15 yr or any of the cask strength bottles are also very welcome here.

Of the "garden variety" 12 yr scotches, Glenlivet is pretty nice, but I find Glenfiddich a bit harsh.

Balvenie makes a nice scotch - recently had a really great 15 yr single barrel.

Ballantine is also quite nice. Spent a pretty penny on a glass of 30 yr not terribly long ago, and it was exquisite.
 

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If I'm ordering scotch at a restaurant or bar, Macallan 12 is my usual. I've also really enjoyed Auchentoshan and Oban when I've had them, as well as Glenmorangie Cellar 13, which as far as I know, is only available in duty-free stores.

I've had the younger Isle of Jura, and didn;t think much of it -- I;d love to try the superstition some day.

Anybody like the Port and Maderia aged scotches? After a good meal, I'd rather have one of those than dessert.
 

Rick_R

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I'm not very knowledgeable when it comes to Scotch, so I'm enjoying reading these posts and getting some ideas. I do enjoy both The Glenlevit and Glenfiddich though the usual purchase is The Glenlevit -- and I know using the "The" 'is pretentious, but I'm in a pretentious mood.

:)

Rick
 

SwAMi75

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jds said:
If I'm ordering scotch at a restaurant or bar, Macallan 12 is my usual. I've also really enjoyed Auchentoshan and Oban when I've had them, as well as Glenmorangie Cellar 13, which as far as I know, is only available in duty-free stores.

I've had the younger Isle of Jura, and didn;t think much of it -- I;d love to try the superstition some day.

Anybody like the Port and Maderia aged scotches? After a good meal, I'd rather have one of those than dessert.

I bought some port finished Glenmorangie a while back, and didn't care for it. I kind of got away form scotch and into bourbon for a while. I revisited it while I was cooking out last weekend, and really liked it. I guess it makes sense, as it's on the sweeter side.
 

Thirdeye

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Bout to pour my second Glenny of the evening. Brain is starting to get a bit warm :drunk:
 

menschmaschine

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I haven't seen Lagavulin (16yr) mentioned. It's a lot like Laphroaig, but somehow more refined... more subtle and balanced with the smoky and peat flavors. It's at the top of my list for Islays. I've not had this one yet, but I hear from a reliable source that Bunnahabhain is excellent. I'm not sure about the availability in the States, but I would think it's available somewhere.
 

fifelee

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I got hooked on Balvenie while living in Edinburgh. FYI - never call it Scotch in Scotland. You will get that "stupid American" look. I know from experience. The publican gave me a dirty look and said, "it is just whiskey here mate".
 

pjj2ba

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fifelee said:
I got hooked on Balvenie while living in Edinburgh.

I had this for the first time this winter, and had to go out and buy a bottle. I've also got some MacCallan, Speyburn, and Glenfarclas. I finally looked at where all the Scotch that I like is from, and was quite pleased to see they all come from the same region - Speyside. Now I know that when I try a new Scotch, and it is from the Speyside region, there is a very good chance I'll like it.
 

kornkob

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I strongly suggest attending Whiskeyfest (there are 2-- one on the West coast and one in Chicago). It's a great way to economically sample LOTS of different whiskey and start to narrow the field and find what you like. $140 gets you access to samples of 100 or so distilleries.


Alternately, it's a great way to get totally f-ed up on expensive booze without spending too much.



But you can really get a handle on your preferences and try out whiskey you might otherwise not want to 'waste' your money on.
 

VatorMan

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My daily drinker is 12 YO Glenlivet. LOVE 18+ YO MaCallan.

I enjoy Jameson 12 YO Irish Whiskey. Talk about smoooooth.:p
 

Danny013

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I'm such a scotch n00b. I've always wanted to get into it and start tasting/learning, but the ante is a bit steep to get into the game.

Anyway, anyone got any good reccommendations? The Islay stuff sounds good - and intruiging - to me; I'd like to delve into that realm first. I've read that some, like Laphroaig, are a bit much and an acquired taste, so are there any single malts that are a little easier on the palate but still have that oily, peaty, iodine, salty taste?

Also, what is the preferred method of drinking a single malt (told ya I was a n00b...)? Rocks? Neat? Any preferred drinking glass, or will a standard old-fashioned rocks glass work just fine?

Cost is a factor too, I'm on a college budget, so nothing horribly expensive, lol.

Thanks for the insight!
 

BierMuncher

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I go to an annual taste testing / learning seminar given by an exclusive bottler from Scotland. They buy up odd reserve casks from single malt distillers and then package them and age them for additonal time.

Might fine tasting spirits and you learn a ton about the art of scotch making.

It's amazing how much of what they do is simply brewing beer (sans the hops).
 

Thirdeye

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Danny013 said:
I'm such a scotch n00b. I've always wanted to get into it and start tasting/learning, but the ante is a bit steep to get into the game.

Anyway, anyone got any good reccommendations? The Islay stuff sounds good - and intruiging - to me; I'd like to delve into that realm first. I've read that some, like Laphroaig, are a bit much and an acquired taste, so are there any single malts that are a little easier on the palate but still have that oily, peaty, iodine, salty taste?

Also, what is the preferred method of drinking a single malt (told ya I was a n00b...)? Rocks? Neat? Any preferred drinking glass, or will a standard old-fashioned rocks glass work just fine?

Cost is a factor too, I'm on a college budget, so nothing horribly expensive, lol.

Thanks for the insight!

I found that starting out on the rocks helps smooth out the rough edges until you get drunk enough not to care, then you go neat :D :drunk:
 

fusion94

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I originally posted this in another thread but it's appropriate here as well.

I know that single malt scotches are a personal thing and I know that those of us that really appreciate them can be kind of snobs in regards to it but here are my .02 worth.

I'm a huge fan of the Islay Single Malts whether it's Lagavulin ($65-$70) or Laphroaig ($30-$60).

Lagavulin has been described as the aristocrat of Islays. It has an unmistakable, powerful, peat-smoke aroma. Described as being robustly full bodied, well-balanced and smooth with a slight sweetness on the palate.

Laphroaig has a hint of sherry that quickly gives way to the Islay intensity and distinctively oily body with a big peaty-smoky flavour. A round, dry and warming finish renders Laphroaig the perfect night-cap.

Now these aren't cheap but they are worth the price. I generally have a bottle of each in my liquor cabinet.

Now if those are out of your price range I'd recommend getting a bottle of Finlaggan. Finlaggan can be had at Trader Joe's in California for about $17.00 a bottle. The taste of is somewhere in-between Lagavullin and Laphroaig and the rumour is that it's actually an 8 year old Lagavullin. I can confirm that it does have some of the same flavour qualities. It's my everyday single malt due to the price and has the best taste (for my tastes) of any single malt I've had priced under $30.00. There's a reason I have 7 bottles of it in my wine cellar.
 
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MULE

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Thirdeye said:
I found that starting out on the rocks helps smooth out the rough edges until you get drunk enough not to care, then you go neat :D :drunk:
You lose a lot of taste characteristics in the whiskey when you add ice. I would be a little upset if I saw someone add ice to a good single malt. But, so you know I am not a total a$$hole.... I don't like harsh smokey flavors in my scotch. I would probably add a little ice to water that taste down a bit.

Danny, it's all about personal taste. Give The Glenlivet 12 a try. It has a nice mellow finish.
 

MikeFlynn74

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You lose a lot of taste characteristics in the whiskey when you add ice. I would be a little upset if I saw someone add ice to a good single malt. But, so you know I am not a total a$$hole.... I don't like harsh smokey flavors in my scotch. I would probably add a little ice to water that taste down a bit.

Not true- Everything ive ever read says add up to 50% water to open up the flavor.
 
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MULE

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MikeFlynn74 said:
Not true- Everything ive ever read says add up to 50% water to open up the flavor.
I've never read that before.

EDIT: From WikiHow http://www.wikihow.com/Taste-Single-Malt-Scotch
Add water. (Optional) as much as half-and-half or as little as a few drops. Adding water depends on the strength and style of the whisky and the taster's preference. Regular bottles contain 40% to 46% alcohol by volume (ABV) and are diluted using the distillery's water source. Some whisky purists (Jim Murray, for example) feel that as it has already been diluted, further dilution is unnecessary. "Cask strength" whiskies are stronger (generally 46% to 60%) and require more water. Avoid tap water, because the chlorine and/or dissolved minerals will interfere with the taste.
 

MikeFlynn74

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Whisky is by definition a strong alcohol (between 40% and 60%). This high alcohol rate is difficult to appreciate by people who are not used to it. This can be considered as an aggression to the papilla's. Adding some fresh water softens the aggressive character of a strong alcohol.

But, even for people who are used to drink strong alcohols, adding a drop of fresh water will open up new horizons. Adding a drop of water will provoke a chemical reaction, freeing the fragrances. The whisky will "open" itself.

In the case of a "cask strength" (generally round 60%), adding water will make it possible to taste the whisky at different alcohol rates. The drinker is entitled to determine the best alcohol rate for himself. When he decides it has reached the ideal alcohol rate, he just can stop adding water.
 
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