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Pug Bros Brewing

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Here is our video link on youtube for step by step directions:

Here's the recipe and steps:
PUG BROS BREWING EPISODE 1 – SAM ADAMS BOSTON LAGER CLONE


Hello and welcome to Pug Bros Brewing Episode 1

In today’s video I’m going to go over how to make a Sam Adams Boston Lager clone using the Extract Brewing method.

We are looking to hit the following ratios for this recipe:

Original gravity: 1.058

Final Gravity: 1.014

Color SRM: 9.79

Alcohol By Volume (ABV): 5.58

IBU: 16.55

Equipment you will need to follow this recipe are the following:

A stove or turkey propane fryer or anything that can boil and hold the temperature of water.

A stainless-steel boiling pot, preferably 4 gallons or larger. For my recipe I used an 8 Gallon pot because I used all 5 gallons according to raise my efficiency for the final recipe. I will get more into that later in the video.

A large Mash Paddle or spoon, preferably stainless steel.

Note: It is important to thoroughly clean and sanitize all of your brewing equipment. I suggest using PBW cleaner to clean all brewing equipment before and after brewing. I use Star San as my choice to sanitize all equipment that will come into contact with my Wort.

Recipe Ingredients:

.5 lbs Crystal Malt (60 L)

.5 lbs Mild Ale Malt

7 lbs Liquid Malt Extract Pale

1 oz Tettnanger Hops (add at beginning 60 min boil)

1 oz Hallertau Mittelfruh Hops (at last 15 minutes of boil)

1 oz Hallertau Mittelfruh Hops (at last 5 minutes of boil)

1 packet of Ale yeast (Fermentis Safale US-05)

NOTE: I would suggest using a timer or alarm app to set multiple alarms while brewing and adding hop additions.

Steps for creating your WORT

1. Begin by heating 2.5 gallons of water in your brew pot. Depending on your water quality, you may want to consider buying purified water for your recipe. For my clone recipe, I used close to 6 gallons of tap water to increase the efficiency. 5 Gallons should be left roughly after the boil, planning on losing close to 1 gallon during the boil process from evaporation.

2. Raise temperature of water in the brew pot between 150 – 160 degrees Fahrenheit max temp. Add your specialty grains of Crystal Malt and Mild Ale Malt into a muslin bag and tie a knot at one end of the grain bag leaving plenty of room from the grains to be loose in the bag. Place that grain bag in the water. Steep your grains for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, remove the grain bag from the pot and let the water drip from the bag. Do not squeeze the grains, just let the liquid drain from the bag into the pot. The water is now considered Wort at this point.

3. You will now turn the heat on high and bring the Wort to a boil. Once you achieved a boil, remove the brew pot from heat source. Add 7 lbs of Liquid Malt Extract, stir until it is complete dissolved. It is important to make sure none of the malt extracts are sitting on the bottom of the brew pot, as it will scorch when returned to the heat source and may create off flavors.

4. Return to a boil and add first hop addition of 1 oz. Tettnanger Hops.

5. At the 45 minute mark, or last 15 minutes of the boil, add 1 oz Hallertau Mittelfruh hops.

6. At the 55 minute mark of the boil, or last 5 minutes of the boil, add 1 oz Hallertau Mittelfruh hops.

7. Once the 60 minute boil is over, it is time to cool the wort. There are many ways to cool the wort, my recommendation is to use a wort chiller. You can also put your boil pot in a sink and surround the boilpot with ice.

8. Cool the wort to under 80 degrees as quickly as possible.

9. All fermentation equipment needs to be sanitized. Anything that comes into contact with the wort at this point needs to be sanitized.

10.Transfer the cooled wort into your fermenting vessel of your choice, top off with cold water until you hit a total of 5-5.125 gallons of total liquid in the primary fermenter. Aerate the wort at this point. This can be accomplished by simple rocking the sealed fermenter back and forth.

11.At this time, you want to take a specific gravity reading. Use a hydrometer and record the reading on paper or anything you can refer to after fermentation.

12.Once the wort is cooled to 78 degrees or below, it is safe to pitch the yeast. Pitch according to the proper procedures of type of yeast you have. Seal the fermenter tight. Attach the sanitized airlock and stopper. Fill the airlock with Sanitized water. Fermentation should begin within 24-48 hours. Do not disturb until the fermentation process is complete.

13.During the fermentation process, CO2 will begin to escape the airlock.

14.Once the primary fermentation is complete, approximately 1 to 2 weeks, you can rack the beer into a secondary fermenter (optional for clarity).

15.Siphon finished beer into bottling bucket or keg. If bottling, you will need to add priming sugar or priming sugar tablets into the bottling bucket to create carbonation in your bottles. If kegging, you can force carbonate your kegs by hooking it up to your keg with 20 lbs of pressure for 2-3 days.
 

dmtaylor

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I would suggest a clean lager yeast such as S-189, rather than US-05 which actually produces a low peachy fruitiness. I might also take the Crystal 60 down to 0.25 lb. Recipe looks okay otherwise. Welcome to the forum. :)
 

Cavpilot2000

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I am a big fan of Boston Lager, but I am always puzzled by homebrew recipes for it. SA has always been very open about the ingredients and specs for Boston Lager - it's 90% pale malt and 10% C-60. Period. I've never seen a "clone" recipe even close to that. They always throw in wild grain bills that aren't even close to what's actually in Boston Lager.

Now I understand you are doing extract and grains, so your base is fine, but your other stats are way off from SA's own published stats. Your OG is way too high and your IBU is way too low.

My two cents, since you asked...
 

BigEd

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I am a big fan of Boston Lager, but I am always puzzled by homebrew recipes for it. SA has always been very open about the ingredients and specs for Boston Lager - it's 90% pale malt and 10% C-60. Period. I've never seen a "clone" recipe even close to that. They always throw in wild grain bills that aren't even close to what's actually in Boston Lager.

Now I understand you are doing extract and grains, so your base is fine, but your other stats are way off from SA's own published stats. Your OG is way too high and your IBU is way too low.

My two cents, since you asked...
Yes, SA Lager is 5% ABV, it's right on their website. I believe they used to list the IBUs but that does not appear on the current website. It is a hell of a lot more than 16.55 and is most likely in the low 30s.
 

dmtaylor

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Yes, SA Lager is 5% ABV, it's right on their website. I believe they used to list the IBUs but that does not appear on the current website. It is a hell of a lot more than 16.55 and is most likely in the low 30s.
True, good point... My own notes collected from who knows where suggest closer to 25 IBUs which I am more likely to believe but somewhere in this neighborhood. Cheers.

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