Safety Lesson for Beginners

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

OP
Iowa Brewer

Iowa Brewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2018
Messages
263
Reaction score
87
Loss of beer is BAD...but (assuming here) you didn't end up with a ton of stitches or worse so there's a bright side based on other horror stories of broken glass carboys.
True that! First thing I did (after a few choice expletives) was check my femoral arteries. So many bad stories out there! Don't think I'm going back to glass
 

balrog

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Nov 26, 2013
Messages
4,104
Reaction score
4,126
Ditto what Balrog said. But you must not be married. If I made a mess like that while brewing, my wife would see to it I wasn't here to tell the tale.
TOo funny! I was actually going to make some comment about how I really did not mean that I was worried about the broken glass getting him, as that would have been the **LEAST** of my concerns had I done that in my significant other's house (that's right, when I make a mess it is no longer my house).
 

MikeCrigger

Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2016
Messages
9
Reaction score
4
Location
Port Huron
1610743516557.png


I use two of these for 10 gallon batches. I put it under the carboys before transferring the wort into them. They protect the glass bottoms too from the cement in my garage. Then I move them to the fridge for fermentation, leaving the net underneath the whole time. Then they are already in place to move again. When they get too dirty, I just throw them in the washing machine. No buckles to break. Been using them for about 6 years now.

Edit: Glad you are safe, I have been in the E.R. from a brewing accident once, and now I double think everything that has potential to hurt me in brewing.
 
OP
Iowa Brewer

Iowa Brewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2018
Messages
263
Reaction score
87
View attachment 714509

I use two of these for 10 gallon batches. I put it under the carboys before transferring the wort into them. They protect the glass bottoms too from the cement in my garage. Then I move them to the fridge for fermentation, leaving the net underneath the whole time. Then they are already in place to move again. When they get too dirty, I just throw them in the washing machine. No buckles to break. Been using them for about 6 years now.

Edit: Glad you are safe, I have been in the E.R. from a brewing accident once, and now I double think everything that has potential to hurt me in brewing.
That looks like a great carboy carrier, Mike! And thanks! And so glad you pulled through your ER crises!
 

Alex4mula

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2018
Messages
508
Reaction score
238
View attachment 714509

I use two of these for 10 gallon batches. ...
Yeah I like those too because they do not have the plastic snap plug like the OP one. I use the same as OP and I'm always paranoid and check the snap clip like 5 times before moving. And when I do the move I carry it like 3" above ground most of the way. But each brew space is different. I worry more when I carry my hot sparge water pot from the stove 30' away (no stairs)...
 

Birrofilo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2021
Messages
612
Reaction score
330
Location
Rome
I don't know why in the US people use carboys without any kind of material around them.
Since the mists of time in Italy the dama, or damigiana, which is basically the glass carboy, is inserted into a protection which is now typically made in plastic, but when I was a child it was in wood or rope. You can use glass if you like it, just buy the right stuff. That also protects wine from light and variations of temperature.


Anyway in order to transport carboys or fermenter my back-saving strategy is to use a trolley, I use this one:


Raising the carboy to the trolley is easy and fast. Then you move the trolley around your house, and then you put it back where you need it. You can make your own by assembling the parts, it's not a complicated object but it is useful.
 
Last edited:

Miraculix

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2017
Messages
4,353
Reaction score
2,796
Location
Bremen
One thing I learned from here without going through it the hard way myself is NEVER EVER USE GLAS FERMENTERS.

Except for the occasional 1 gallon batch.... But as soon as there is serious weight involved, nope sir, no glass for me please. It can even crack on it's own without me doing anything stupid to it. You never know how many micro cracks are already inside from transportation or faults from production. Glass carboys, so much nope nope nope!!
 
OP
Iowa Brewer

Iowa Brewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2018
Messages
263
Reaction score
87
One thing I learned from here without going through it the hard way myself is NEVER EVER USE GLAS FERMENTERS.

Except for the occasional 1 gallon batch.... But as soon as there is serious weight involved, nope sir, no glass for me please. It can even crack on it's own without me doing anything stupid to it. You never know how many micro cracks are already inside from transportation or faults from production. Glass carboys, so much nope nope nope!!
Yeah, there's a lot of good ideas on here, but with my situation with stairs, Glas geht nicht mehr für mich!
 

bwible

I drink, and I know things
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Oct 31, 2017
Messages
771
Reaction score
804
Location
Oxford
A beautiful 5.5gal of English ESB (OG 5.6) ended up on the floor last night.
Lesson to new brewers? Be sure to connect the straps correctly before carrying your carboy down the stairs.
The orange carboy “handle” in that first photo is pure crap. I owned a homebrew shop and I refused to sell them. Very bad idea. You can’t carry a carboy like that and put pressure on the neck of the carboy like that. I have heard many stories of carboy necks being snapped off. I know you had a strap device and were using that. I would advise anybody who owns one of these orange carboy handles to deposit it in the nearest trash can where it belongs.
 
OP
Iowa Brewer

Iowa Brewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2018
Messages
263
Reaction score
87
Sorry for your loss and no glass for me either, way too scary. A bucket is nice, it has a handle, wide mouth and when it gets too old you just replace it with another cheap bucket.
Loads of truth in that, Transamguy77!
 
OP
Iowa Brewer

Iowa Brewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2018
Messages
263
Reaction score
87
RIP ESB!! I've always used plastic carboys because I could get them for free at work, after seeing your post, I'm glad I don't have glass. Thanks!
Hear, hear! I always have to transfer from my brewing operation on the main floor to my fermenters in the basement, so I'm switching to plastic, myself!
 

#p3brews

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 5, 2020
Messages
59
Reaction score
40
I know that breaking a carboy is a dangerous risk and am always careful. The other day i chipped the top of one of my 6 gallon glass carboys (see photo below). Now i am wondering if it's worth the risk of using this one anymore or am i up against an even weaker carboy that will be more succeptable to thermal shock and breaking? Thoughts or experiences? Mahalo.
b1.jpg
 

bwible

I drink, and I know things
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Oct 31, 2017
Messages
771
Reaction score
804
Location
Oxford
I know that breaking a carboy is a dangerous risk and am always careful. The other day i chipped the top of one of my 6 gallon glass carboys (see photo below). Now i am wondering if it's worth the risk of using this one anymore or am i up against an even weaker carboy that will be more succeptable to thermal shock and breaking? Thoughts or experiences? Mahalo.
View attachment 732992
Yeah I had a 6 gallon crack on me in 2019 in moving to a new house. I got rid of it. I only use 6 gallon carboys for the occasional box wine kit, and I don’t make those much anymore.

I don’t know if that chip would weaken the carboy, but jagged glass is certainly nothing to play with. Shame because 6 gallon carboys sure aren’t cheap nowadays. I bought one 3 gallon fermonster and after using that I will only buy those now if anything happens to any of my glass ones.
 

#p3brews

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 5, 2020
Messages
59
Reaction score
40
Knowing you all are right and to error on the side of caution is the smart choice, this chipped 6 gallon carboy will be retired.
I have already purchased a 7 gal chronical and am looking at a 15 gal. The 7 gal plastic Speidel is only a back up, as I don't like plastic.
Now, let's hear any good ideas you might have for the chipped 6 gal glass carboy retirement party and next gig?
Danke und prost.
 

Golddiggie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2010
Messages
12,568
Reaction score
928
Location
Living free in the 603
Stainless steel FTW!

Also, I'd seriously look into switching brewing location closer to where the fermentation location is. There are plenty of options out there these days for setting up a full brewing system inside without having to spend several hundred (or $1k+) dollhairs for steam removal.
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
17,562
Reaction score
7,665
Location
Pasadena, MD
I know that breaking a carboy is a dangerous risk and am always careful. The other day i chipped the top of one of my 6 gallon glass carboys (see photo below). Now i am wondering if it's worth the risk of using this one anymore or am i up against an even weaker carboy that will be more succeptable to thermal shock and breaking? Thoughts or experiences? Mahalo.
View attachment 732992
As long as there are no structural defects, cracks etc., looks like that can be smoothed out with a Dremel. Maybe even epoxied.
Then wrap some tape or plastic film around it.
 
Top