Rice Beer (Korean)

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demingbill

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New to this site so thanks for your input. Looking for a recepie to make a "peasant" beer or wine I tasted in Korea. Believe the only ingredients were rice, water and raisins. Thanks>>>:mug:
 

Drunkensatyr

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Sorry I can't help but I bet someone will know. Welcome to the board.
I am assuming that This is what you are referring to.
 

Monk

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Off topic, but they also drink cold malt barley juice. Basically, it's made by mashing malted barley, sparging and then watering it down a bit. It's just sweet wort that hasn't been boiled or hopped. They drink it like ice tea on the west side--I had it with my relatives. I'm going to surprise my in-laws with a bottle when I make my next batch (they only get a gallon).
 

david_42

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I believe there is a recipe for Korean farmer's wine in Fred Eckhardt 'Sake USA'.
 

Zymurgrafi

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Makkeolli (or makjeolli, many different romanizations...) or dondong ju are most likely what you are looking for.

Deliscious! I just got back from Korea and had some dongdong ju for the first time. Very unique and tasty. I have had and made various kinds of saké; including doboruku which is the Japanse equivalent to dongdong ju, but it is definately different flavor-wise.

I just started a batch and I will post the process and results when it is finished but here are the basics for my first simple trial. The key ingredient is the enzyme nuruk (pronounced new-Rook only almost sounds like you are saying noodle with a soft k at the end) You can get it at a korean grocery store. Or you can try making it if you do not have access to a store. Take whole wheat berries and crack them in a mill. Add enough hot water to make a dough ball. Wrap it in cheesecloth and place it in a dark warm place (86° F) such as a cardboard box with a heating pad or hot water bottle. Leave it for a few days. It should grow mold and dry out. This mold is what will convert the rice starch to sugar. Dry it completely (it will smell pretty bad) to help with the smell and crush it up.

Ingredients:

1000 g Sweet rice (Short grain, called chapsal rice in Korea) or a medium grain if you cannot get sweet rice. Though the wine will not have the same sweetness.

30 g of Nuruk.
5 g of yeast (I used safeale US-05 but You could use other ale or wine yeast)
1500 ml of water

Rinse the rice well until water runs clear. Soak for a few hours. Place the rice in a cheesecloth lined steamer (bamboo steamer is ideal but use what you have) and steam for an hour. Cool the rice to pitching temps. Add the Nuruk, rice, water and yeast in a large (2 gallon or so) open mouthed glass, ceramic, or possibly stainless steel container. Mix it well. Place a lid on and set in a warm place (70's to 80's but not too hot). The rice will absorb all the liquid as it sits. Stir it with a sanitized spoon. As it sits the rice should break down some and become more liquid.

Again, I'll post more in a new thread when I have my first batch done. It is similar to saké making (which I have done) but I want to see how it turns out before I post a full "recipe" process.
 

APendejo

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Mmmmmmm..... Shots of Jinro-Soju washed down with Mokoli. If you are really looking for a batsh!t crazy high you substitute the Jinro-Soju with Kaoling Chinese corn squeezin's.
I think Mokoli is just fermented rice starch water, tastes like a flat beer, thick like snot going down your throat, an aquired taste.
As a young buck sargent in the Army I spent a lot of time between paydays sitting in the Soju joints BS'ing with papa-san. Surprising you could get a bottle of Soju, a pot of mokoli, and a plate of regular and diakon kimchi for a buck back in '75.
AP
 

Zymurgrafi

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Glibbidy said:
:off: I have some of Zero's Sake in my fridge, and can attest that it is a unique taste.
If you think that is unique, just wait. I'll bring some doboruku or maybe dongdong ju if it turns out next time.

Kind of like sweet, alcoholic, carbonated rice milk. Sometimes with a porridge (floating rice) consistency! :D

Definately has BODY

:drunk:
 

Dr Vorlauf

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Interesting topic. I did a wheat beer once and wet Kimcheed in the secondary. Interesting brew, I overdid the Kimchee but drank it all! EDIT mad it with some rice.
 

Nurmey

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It's funny that this came up since I spent time on Sunday googling recipes for rice beer.

Zero, do you know if you can buy Nuruk at most Asian food markets?
 

MikeFlynn74

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Interesting topic. I did a wheat beer once and wet Kimcheed in the secondary. Interesting brew, I overdid the Kimchee but drank it all! EDIT mad it with some rice.
__________________
That is the most goddamn disgusting thing I have ever heard.
 

Dr Vorlauf

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MikeFlynn74 said:
That is the most goddamn disgusting thing I have ever heard.

Actually did it with a bit too much Kimchee. But it came out great. Nice crisp wheet
beer with a bit of warm Kinchee on the aftertaste. I had a nice pretty lite Kimchee taste.

Great beer for eating pizza or wings, Bul gook ki.. madu etc.

Actually it also would have been good for cooking
 

MikeFlynn74

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Bul gook ki
Bulgogi and Yaki mandu is some of my fav- but kimchi is like eating sewage

I actually tried Kegogi when I was in Korea- not bad. I wouldnt eat it again.
 

Dr Vorlauf

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Think of this as a BMC taste of Kimchee. Its not face slapping.. just a little flavor. Mostly the peppers and garlic come through. They are at the palate but not on the plate.
 

Zymurgrafi

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Nurmey said:
Zero, do you know if you can buy Nuruk at most Asian food markets?
Most, I don't know. Ones that carry a selection of Korean food products, probably. I was just giving instructions for making it for the benefit of a) those without access to such a market and b) hardcore folks who like to make everything from scratch. ;)

As to the taste of kimchi... If you don't like that, don't try this! Kimchi is WONDERFUL

Many, many kinds too, not just the mainstay of cabbage.
 

Bosh

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Good makkoli has a heavy dose of the kind of sourness you get from bacteria. I'm not quite sure which kind of bacteria you'd use for that, but I'd assume it'd be the same as for sour beers.
 

Zymurgrafi

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Bosh said:
Good makkoli has a heavy dose of the kind of sourness you get from bacteria. I'm not quite sure which kind of bacteria you'd use for that, but I'd assume it'd be the same as for sour beers.
Mostly lactic acid (lactobacillus). You will get that naturally from the air. Brewing rice "wines" such as these is a slightly less um, sanitary process then we are used to dealing with in beer. When I brew saké I actually add lactic acid as that is how modern breweries do it now. It saves a bit of time and a few steps. It can be accomplished naturally though. Some of the sourness also comes from the mold (enzyme) in the nuruk from the wheat.
 

JungMin

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Has anyone found a good recipe for this??? I'm living in Korea now and love the stuff!!! Definitely an acquired taste, as is the beer here!!! OK, maybe I will never like the beer....But makkoli is good!!!
 

dave042

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I am also living in Korea and been searching for a receipe. I was watching a special on Arirang channel and they were discussing the making of the Korean rice wines. Unfortunately I had a few too many maekju's and can't remember exactly what they said. I do remember them saying dongdong ju was unfiltered (rice floaties) and makgeolli was filtered. It may have gone through a secondary fermentation after filtering.

I have found the best tasting is home made kind sold by the adjuma's in the mountains.
 

homebrewer_99

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I like dongdongju, but can't find it commercially.

I'm going back to Korea in Dec for a couple of weeks...maybe, just maybe...;)

Anyone over there need supplies?

I'll be at Dongduchon, Camp Casey, 8-17 Dec. I'm supposed to leave on the 20th, but a lot of military will be leaving for the holidays so I'll probably leave early to beat the rush. ;)
 

homebrewer_99

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Here's the recipe I got while in Korea earlier this year:

DONG DONG JU Recipe

Ingredients:
Korean rice: 1KG
Yeast – 8 gm., any wine yeast will do for DDJ in Korea.
Nooruk - enzyme 200gm. - made with crushed wheat malt.
Clean water - 1.6 liter, I used filtered water

Method: (all equipment must be sanitized, hands included)

1) Wash 1KG of Korean rice and soak overnight.
2) Allow to drain for at least 2 hours prior to steaming.
3) Into the steamer for 1 hour of steam cooking.
4) After rice is well cooked, spread it onto a tray to cool to room temperature.
5) After it is cooled, add crushed Nooruk and yeast. (wear a disposable plastic glove, sprayed with Iodophor to mix thoroughly by hand).
6) Once thoroughly mixed, the rice is ready to be placed into a fermenter.
7) Add 1.6L of clean or bottled water into the mixture.

Basically what happens is the nooruk (amylase enzyme) converts the steamed rice into sugar for fermentation. Nooruk is made with crushed wheat malt and water. It is a mold that occurs naturally with wheat malt.

Almost 2 hours after the mash is in the fermenter, all water is absorbed by the rice malt

After 3 days stir the mash twice a day until it is ready to serve in 10 days.

I haven't made this yet because I don't have a steamer, but I have all the other ingredients.

Dong means sh*t in Korean. Dongdongju is basically an unfiltered mokeli (no shi*t floating in it).
 
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