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Rhizomes vs. rooted cuttings?

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FullThrottle64

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Two weeks ago I planted 21 rooted cuttings and 27 rhizomes. All the cuttings are doing OK, and 15 of the rhizomes are showing visible shoots.

The trellis:
Trellis 06142020.jpg



Two of the rhizome plantings:
Rhizome 1 06142020.jpg
Rhizome 2 06142020.jpg
Note that they are putting out multiple shoots, and I'm finally starting to see some leaves on a handful.

Now, the planted seedlings - these things are doing fairly well, I think:

Seedling 1 06142020.jpg


Seedling 2 06142020.jpg


I planted late, but this is what I'm getting.

Now, a question: Aside from price, why would you go with rhizomes instead of seedling starter plants? All of these were planted in the exact same way and have had the exact same treatment. Will the Rhizomes develop their root structure faster?
 
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B-Hoppy

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Were those actually seedlings or rooted cuttings?

Up until about 8-10 years ago there weren't really any vendors selling anything other than rhizomes. The hop growing craze has made it economically feasible for some greenhouse growers to begin propagating and selling rooted cuttings. Rhizomes are also more forgiving when it comes to shipping and long term storage is about all I can see.

Just a tip, when you plant any sort of perennial, it's always a great practice to start with a clean slate (bare ground situation). That grass growing around your plants will make it very hard to maintain your set up in the long term.
 
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FullThrottle64

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Were those actually seedlings or rooted cuttings?
Cuttings.

Just a tip, when you plant any sort of perennial, it's always a great practice to start with a clean slate (bare ground situation). That grass growing around your plants will make it very hard to maintain your set up in the long term.
Yeah, this is what happens when your tiller selects an inopportune time to break down. I'll probably end up tilling around and between the rows after harvest, and use cardboard scraps or landscape cloth to get rid of the grass between the individual hills. I will definitely till it under on either side for next year's expansion, which is loosely planned for two more rows on either side, for a total of 6 rows of 30 plants each.
 
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