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Cactus

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Ok guys need help.


1st keg I did no problem. Go to hook up my 2nd keg same exact set up, 1st week no problem. Go out there the next week and tank empty. Cant figure out why:(

So I get the tank re-filled and hook up regulater and hear the smallest of noises. Spray with soapy water, no bubbles any where?!?!

I made sure the nut for the screw that you twist with a penny to turn to up the pressure is tight and all good. Figure the problem is there. When I twist the srew to bring down the pressure noise gets a little louder, when I bring it back up to about 10psi the noise goes away.

Any ideas or am I just being parnoid???

S. Paddys day, wife is sick and was just trying to get a pint or two of my Irish red with dinner.
 

SpanishCastleAle

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This response is based on the typical regulators sold at homebrew supply shops.

That nut around the regulator pressure adjustment bolt is purely for 'locking' that bolt in place and has nothing to do with leakage. It really has very little purpose/use in a homebrew setting.

When you increase the pressure setpoint (turning the bolt clockwise) the regulator flows...so you'll hear flow until the outlet pressure equals the setpoint. If the regulator is flowing (meaning it hasn't reached setpoint yet) and you turn down the pressure (by turning the bolt CCW) the flow stops at some point (when the regulator setpoint=outlet pressure) and you won't hear any flow anymore. Turning it down from there won't really do anything because it's already shut off.

When I twist the srew to bring down the pressure noise gets a little louder, when I bring it back up to about 10psi the noise goes away.
That's opposite of what I would expect. These regs are not self-venting. That just means that when you decrease the pressure setpoint, the regulator doesn't vent to achieve that pressure...you have to vent the outlet side manually to achieve a lower pressure. What that means is that when you decrease the setpoint below the existing pressure it should stop flowing and you shouldn't hear anything.

Regarding the leak: Sometimes you have to divide and conquer. So try to eliminate potential leak sources one or two at a time...then move to another one. I would check all your lines and even the regulator assembly by dialing it up to 30psi or so and submerging in water and looking for bubbles (remember that the reg 'dome' will fill with water and bubble for a minute or so when you first submerge it). If you get no bubbles then you know that your leak is either a keg or the QD/keg connection (which it probably is).

You can also do what's called a 'gage decay' test. If your beer is fully carbed and fully cooled in the keg then you should be able to shut off the gas...wait for about 30 minutes or so...then open the valve to let gas back into the keg. If you have no leak then there shouldn't be any flow when you open that valve (the keg remained at full pressure)...if you hear flow into the keg then either the keg leaks or the QD/keg connection leaks. If you were to perform this same test but pull the QD off to stop the gas flow (instead of shutting a valve) then any leak would HAVE to be the keg itself. EDIT: if you do this last one you need to spray the poppet with leak check as soon as you remove the QD...those things often leak a little unless seated perfectly...and that 'new' leak might lead you astray.

The QD/keg connection is prob the hardest to catch with leak check (soapy water). That connection would be my first guess.
 
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Cactus

Cactus

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I will try these methods out.

So just hook up gas and place the whole thing in water. Didnt think of that.

Thanks
 

TrojanMan

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Check for leaks around the kegs, too.

When the corny fittings are put on dry, the orings inside can leak.
The easy solution is to take your spray bottle of star-san (which every homebrewer should have handy) and give the inside of the fitting and the keg shank each a squirt or two before snapping them together. Helps keep bugs out of your beer as well.

Also, the closure on the keg is a big leak point. I'll put a little food-safe o-ring lube on the seal before I sanitize and close it and always purge the air after filling with beer. While you're purging, go ahead and use slight pressure around the seal to make sure everything is tight. Any leaks and you'll see bubbles in your star-san.

MOST IMPORTANTLY, be absolutely certain that your liquid fitting(s) aren't leaking. An empty CO2 tank sucks, but a kegerator with 2 inches of your homebrew in the bottom is a tragedy you won't soon forget.
 

McKBrew

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, but a kegerator with 2 inches of your homebrew in the bottom is a tragedy you won't soon forget.
Been there, done that. Agree that it sucks. Especially losing the whole bottle of CO2.

Leaks are challenging. Look for tight connections everywhere. Make sure that your post and dip tube O rings are intact. Make sure you have a good seal on your keg lid.

Good Luck.
 

kirscp

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Okay, the regulator is "releasing" pressure, as the pressure in the keg is higher than you have set on the regulator.

If you have a check valve this will not happen and the keg will stay at the pressure you have set.

It is completely NORMAL. The sound will stop once the keg pressure reaches the regulator pressure.
 

SpanishCastleAle

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Okay, the regulator is "releasing" pressure, as the pressure in the keg is higher than you have set on the regulator.

If you have a check valve this will not happen and the keg will stay at the pressure you have set.

It is completely NORMAL. The sound will stop once the keg pressure reaches the regulator pressure.
That's not how the typical regulators sold at homebrew supply shops work...they're not self-venting. You shouldn't need (or even want) a check valve. But I dunno what kind of reg the op has.

Even if that was it...it wouldn't drain the CO2 bottle. It would just vent until the pressure equalized (like you said in your last sentence).
 
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Cactus

Cactus

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Update..
Well to start I disconnected the co2 and let it rest over night. Still had pressure this morning in both keg and tank. If anything has changed by the time I get home. I will drop the regulater in water and check for bubbling that way.

Thanks for the support and all the ideas.
 

springer

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That's not how the typical regulators sold at homebrew supply shops work...they're not self-venting. You shouldn't need (or even want) a check valve. But I dunno what kind of reg the op has.

Even if that was it...it wouldn't drain the CO2 bottle. It would just vent until the pressure equalized (like you said in your last sentence).
My secondary regs are all self-venting. They will release pressure and settle at the new lower pressure, there are check valves on all the lines. This was a coke setup at a bar 4 regs and 12 CO2 lines
 

SpanishCastleAle

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My secondary regs are all self-venting. They will release pressure and settle at the new lower pressure, there are check valves on all the lines. This was a coke setup at a bar 4 regs and 12 CO2 lines
That doesn't surprise me that a bar setup might have that but that's why I was careful to say 'typical regulators sold at homebrew supply shops'. Self-venting regs are usually nicer, more expensive regs. The ones I'm refering to are pretty cheap.
 
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Cactus

Cactus

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Well everything holding pressure still. Will have to wait till Saturday to get at it again. For now I turned tank off just in case and keg was still holding pressure.
 
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Cactus

Cactus

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Ok. Lost pressure in keg.Tank held up.
I will be switching o-rings tonight. Is there a substitute for keg lube? Veggie oil maybe?
I thought I seen something on here about that.
 

joeunc

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lubrifilm canbe used, you would have to check local stores. Also, you can check the Depot or Lowes for any food grade type lubircant. I have a local LHBS store I get all this from, but those other stores may have a "food-grade" lubricant.
 
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Cactus

Cactus

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Thanks Joe. I have a LHBS around me too. Just trying to save a trip.
 
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Cactus

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Found it!!

Changed my o-rings and was ready to go. Did all that was suggested, and still was having an issue. Turns out...... I actually put the dang thing on way too tight and it was letting out some air I guess.

I went to my LHBS and brought the regulater with me and had them hook it up to a tank and I watched him do it by hand. I was using a pair of pliers(sp?) to make sure it was good and tight.

You know to make sure it doesnt leak. Well that was the only thing either of us could come up. Seeing I already spent about a week looking for leaks.

Anyways got back home and hooked it up and didnt over tighten and all is well.
Racked up the Apfelwein and pourd myself one in the proccess and life is good. :ban:
Thanks all again for your help and suggestions.
 
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