Random Yeast Question

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

ryscott

Active Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
30
Reaction score
0
This idea popped into my head on my ride home from work today and it might be crazy but I figured I would ask anyways just out of curiosity.

Would it be possible to ferment using two different yeasts at the same time? Would that add complexity if the two yeasts give different results? Or would it just end up going horribly wrong?
 

Brew-boy

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 31, 2006
Messages
2,271
Reaction score
19
Location
Lapeer, Michigan
Yes it is, in fact white labs sells several. I just used WLP060 which has 3 yeast strains in it.
 

homebrewer_99

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2005
Messages
19,581
Reaction score
1,206
Location
I-80, Exit 27 (near the Quad Cities)
Theoretically it is possible.

However, I'm certain one yeast would dominate the other depending on its best working conditions, the amount of malt in the wort and the fermenting temperature.

For instance, blending an ale and a lager yeast, one would dominate depending on fermenting temp. At a warmer temp the ale would ferment it out and the lager yeast would make the brew fruity (esters).

An ale yeast that ferments out dry may work well with a weizen yeast, which would do most of the work then the other would ferment it out further to make it drier.

I'd say that if you can't control the temp then you'll never know what the results may be.
 
OP
R

ryscott

Active Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
30
Reaction score
0
Oh cool, sounds interesting. Perhaps my next brew will have multiple strains :). Thanks for the quick response.
 

toastermm

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jun 23, 2008
Messages
152
Reaction score
3
Location
The Northern Rockies
Yeast do not take well to competition. They may be extremely hardy, but they will poop out if challenged in the long run.

If you do go with multiple strains, I would suggest making a starter of each yeast strain (if possible) or going with liquid yeast. The more volume of yeast you pitch, the less time they have for competition and will equally add to the beer. That is if you want to give each strain a chance to add to the flavor.

Hope that helps.
 
Top