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kartracer2

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Still trying to figure out how they ended up where they are without bending up the airplane much more severely. Luckily, both occupants survived, and have been rescued.

lt's a retractable gear Mooney, and the gear are down, so it looks like they might have been trying to land when they hit the wires/tower.

Brew on :mug:
Yeah, even at stall speed of say 65mph I would think there would be more damage. I'm sure the air frame etc. is toast but to still be in basically "one piece" is amazing.
Cheers, :mug:
Joel B.
 

GrogNerd

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a friend:
When I say we're in the neighborhood of the plane in the powerlines, I mean we're just under 1270 feet--less than a quarter mile.


says they didn't hear it, the lights flickered & they never lost power

meanwhile, my boss lives 3 miles farther down the road & lost power for a couple hours.
 

El Whedo

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This is the ruins of the brothel at Elizabethtown, NM. At one time folks thought Elizabethtown would be the Capitol when New Mexico gained Statehood. It was the largest town in the Territory, and the first incorporated town. It is all private property today on a friends ranch up valley from my village, but visitors are allowed as long as they announce themselves.

DSCN0114.JPG
 

grampamark

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Still trying to figure out how they ended up where they are without bending up the airplane much more severely. Luckily, both occupants survived, and have been rescued.

lt's a retractable gear Mooney, and the gear are down, so it looks like they might have been trying to land when they hit the wires/tower.

Brew on :mug:
From the damage on the underside of the fuselage, just aft of the trailing edge of the wing, it looks like the plane clipped the top of the tower in the background first. That would have slowed it down enough that it basically fell into the tower where it stopped.

In 50+ years of messing about with small airplanes I’ve actually witnessed 2 accidents. One involved an attempt to turn while taxiing too fast, which ended with the airplane on its back, but the other was a power line strike. Those wires are remarkably elastic and, in the case of the crash I was present for, the airplane almost came to a stop and then fell the remaining 15-20 feet to the ground. Almost as if the pilot had time to wave bye-bye, like Wile E. Coyote when he runs off the edge of the cliff.
 

GrogNerd

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I "witnessed" this crash

I was on duty, roving patrol on the Fleet Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Center Pacific (FLEASWTRACENPAC) at the end of the peninsula into San Diego Bay. from that vantage, you can see North Island NAS & the first part of runway 18.

when flights are departing that runway, you can see them at the flight line, watch them roll forward, THEN hear their engines powering up. they disappear out of view for a few seconds, then you can see them get airborne farther down the island.

that's what USUALLY happens. this time, the plane never got enough altitude for us to spot it in the air. next thing, there's a big cloud of black smoke coming from the crash site.

 

bleme

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Please tell me that's photoshopped
Supposedly, this was at Ball State. The original building was built in 1972 with that sign done properly facing the entrance. In 1982 they did a major renovation and addition and that entrance was changed to a loading dock, with the newer part of the building messing up the sign on the left.
 

BongoYodeler

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Supposedly, this was at Ball State. The original building was built in 1972 with that sign done properly facing the entrance. In 1982 they did a major renovation and addition and that entrance was changed to a loading dock, with the newer part of the building messing up the sign on the left.
That's a funny and interesting story. Since they could have redone it correctly, but chose not to, tells me it was purposely done this way with a nod and a wink.
 

doug293cz

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"The accident occurred on the return flight to GAI while the airplane was operating on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan.
Dark night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed in the area of GAI at the time of the accident. The reported weather at GAI included variable wind at 4 knots, an overcast ceiling at 200 ft above ground level (agl), and 1.25 statute miles visibility in fog. A convective SIGMET was valid for the accident time."

The first error the pilot made was the decision to make the flight at all in night instrument (low visibility) conditions with an active convective sigmet. A convective sigmet (significant meteorological condition alert) tells you that you can expect nasty turbulence, including strong downdrafts. Also, the ceiling (bottom of clouds) was too low to allow landing at the destination airport.

And then the pilot failed to fly the airplane within tolerances that have to be demonstrated to get the IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) certificate (license) that he had. He was doing a bad job of flying the airplane, while not being able to see where he was going.
"About that time, another airplane on approach to GAI announced that visibility was below minima and requested a diversion to another airport."

Finally, after another pilot reported that the visibility and clouds were too low to land at the destination airport, the pilot decided to continue on to that airport anyway. Another major mistake.

He is lucky, as is his passenger, to be alive.

Brew on :mug:
 
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