Ramp it up?

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UnrulyGentleman

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Still new to doing all grain, hoping on doing my 2nd BIAB tomorrow and the recipe I'm following says to mash-in at 145 then ramp temp to 152. Now, to me this reads as put in my grain when temperature reads 145 and keep heating it until it gets to 152 and then let it mash for an hour. Am I misunderstanding and it really means hold it at 145 for a certain amount of time, then raise heat to the next temp, like a step mash? Thanks in advance for helping silly noob.
 

cfonnes

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Between 131-150°F is Beta Amylase, this rest produces maltose.

Between 154-162°F is Alpha Amylase, this rest produces a variety of sugars including maltose.

The recipe has you mash in at 145, the temperature of the grain will drop the water temperature a few degrees. I am assuming that the time that it takes you to raise the temp to 152 is being considered a Beta Rest.

If I were you I would make it easy on myself and figure out what water temperature I would need to add the grain and get a water temperature of 152. The final results will be the same as what your recipe states.

There are many calculators for this do a search for calculating strike water temperature.
 

tre9er

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Yeah as mentioned, for a 6g. batch with room temp grain I usually dough-in at least 10* over desired temp. In your case if you end up below 145, say 140 or 135 that's fine. The time it takes to raise to "final" mash temp of 152 can be considered the BA rest, as mentioned.

Remember to stir since you're adding direct heat to the tun.
 

wfowlks

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I'm not sure what kind of beer you are making, but all the ones I have done (5 batches so far) have me heat the water to a higher temp then put the grains in and let it sit, because of the thermal loss due to the grain.

But if those are the instructions verbatim then I would agree with your conclusion.
 

brewit2it

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I'm not sure what kind of beer you are making, but all the ones I have done (5 batches so far) have me heat the water to a higher temp then put the grains in and let it sit, because of the thermal loss due to the grain.

But if those are the instructions verbatim then I would agree with your conclusion.
Problem is you risk burning your bag by direct firing so have to be careful. I agree that I would just calculate your strike temp for a mash temp of 152 and forget the 145.
 

tre9er

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add heat on low, keep bag off bottom, stir frequently, preferably with lid on.
 
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