Raising Fermentation Temperature

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Maverick986

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I've read about, and even experimented a little regarding raising beer fermentation temperature after three to four days. I've tried raising 1 degree per day, and have read everything from 0.5-2 or even free rising to room temp.

I'm using S-04,which I pitched a bit warm then dropped the temp to 60, with a starting gravity 1.073, and three days in has dropped to 1.015 (expected final) and still chugging. I'm looking to raise the temp now, with having to travel this weekend, and wasn't sure if allowing the beer to free rise to room temp will have a negative impact on the beer?

im assuming the beer will be fine to free rise, given it's close to the end, so my primary question here, does the rate the beer raises in temp once it nears the end of fermentation play any role in the finished product, or is the 0.5-2 deg that I've seen directed at beers that aren't close to finishing yet?
 

hotbeer

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Pitched a bit warm then dropped the temp to 60°F... how warm was it?

With yeast I've always felt that going from warm to cold too quick is more detrimental than from cold to warm. However, I've never really dug in to info for that as I'm pretty always fermenting in a ambient temp of 69-71°F and letting the yeast drive the temp up as much as they care and then coast back down after they get less active.

Perhaps if I was ever to do Lager's, I'd be more concerned about controlling temps so carefully. With S-04, I don't think you are doing Lager's either.

Fermentis says that S-04's fermentation temperature is Ideally 18-26°C (64.4-78.8°F) on their website.

I ask them about the temp discrepancy between their website and their packets of US-05. They said that current testing is showing different and that they had pre-printed too many sachets and were using them up instead of tossing them. But they felt that even with the old temp range you'd still make good beer. And probably that's true. But it might be good to always check current stuff on the website unless your packets are years out of date.
 

IslandLizard

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Rising temps to ensure completion is good, traditional even. Just make sure temps don't drop, like overnight, as the yeast can stall and will be about impossible to resurrect.
I had an issue with S-04 like that in an 1.090-some Old Ale, years ago. Remained at 1.034, whatever I tried.
 
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Maverick986

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Their site said to pitch at higher than fermentation temp, and their rehydration was up to 84 deg. I pitched at 83, then turned on my chiller to drop to 60. This took a bit, as I set it, then had company over and about 4 or 5 hours later found it at 83 still, as I apparently didn't get everything set for the chiller to kick on. So it probably got to 60 a good 6-8 hrs or more after pitching.

My plan at this point is to either turn the chiller off, or set to 70 and let the beer rise on its own and let sit for about another week or whenever final gravity is reached, then cold crash.
 

hotbeer

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Their site said to pitch at higher than fermentation temp, and their rehydration was up to 84 deg. I pitched at 83,
I read that as if you hydrate your yeast prior to pitching then use wort or water at 77°F to 84°F. During it's 15 - 30 minute rest that temp is going to come down quite a bit for that little amount of water.

I don't see that they are saying to have all your wort in the FV at those higher temps. Also, I have never pre-hydrated my yeast to make a starter and have only just directly pitched dry yeast to the wort in the FV.

While I might have to do some more reading, generally I believe the wort in the FV out to be the temp you plan to start out at. I generally start at the temp my FV is going to be kept in since I don't do any active cooling. Ales and IPA's really don't need it unless you have to keep it in a space that isn't air-conditioned.
 

Carolina_Matt

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Part of the answer depends on what you consider 'room temperature'. Plenty of people keep their house in the low 70's in the summer. I keep mine at 76-77 in the summer, and in the low 80's when I'm out of town.

As long as it's in the 70's, I don't see how it would have any noticeable impact now that it's close to FG and most of the heavy hitting is over with.
 

Calder

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Your good to let it go to room temp. No issues with heating rate. Beer is mostly done, so will not affect flavor, and unless your room temp is 100 F, you will not shock the yeast. It will probably be OK with 100 F.

I raise my Belgians at a rate of a couple of degrees a day, starting about the second day, not after fermentation is complete.

For yeast that need a Diacetyl rest, I will just raise the temp after fermentation is done. Usually about 5 degrees, no control of rate, and leave it there a couple of days.
 
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