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Raise mash temp a tad to enhance maltiness..?

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beergears

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For a given recipe and grain bill, is it correct to say that raising mash water temp a little bit (152->154) should bring out a bit more maltiness in the beer, ultimately?
 

discgolfin

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Yes as you go from 153 to as high as 158..you than end up with more unfermentable sugars. These sugars are extracted and do not fement so in the end result you end up with a beer that has more body or mouth feel as well as maltiness. I like 153 to 154..nice middle of the road range. What type of beer are u making?

Jay
 

Funkenjaeger

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Mashing higher will indeed leave more unfermentables, leaving your beer with a little more body and sweetness, however I don't know if this associates with maltiness... and regardless, if you're looking to increase maltiness without affecting the other aspects of the beer, this wouldn't necessarily be the best choice anyway.

Maltiness is caused by maillard reactions which require heat, sugar, and amino acids (which are present in the wort). For this reason they are typically formed when temperature is much higher, such as during kilning, or during the boil. This is why malts kilned slightly darker than pale malt can be very malty, such as vienna, munich, or the aptly named melanoidin malt. This is also why some scottish ales (which are supposed to be malty) call for boils longer than 60 minutes.

If I were looking to increase the maltiness of a beer, I would simply add/substitute in a maltier grain like the three I just mentioned.
 
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beergears

beergears

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discgolfin said:
What type of beer are u making?

Jay

EdWort's Haus Ale, first AG, today...

I guess i was subconsciously trying to find an excuse for missing my temp target.. :)

No, seriously, I think I saw a post from Orfy saying he mashes at 155-156 because he likes a little more body, or, at least, that's how I recall it.
 

Funkenjaeger

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I found that Ed's haus pale ale was nice and malty as it is. Mash how you want to determine the body, however bear in mind that the body of the beer will depend on the mash temp but also the gravity of the batch... When I've done Ed's haus pale I've mashed it on the cooler side (152 or below) to keep it somewhat dry, and nice and crisp and drinkable. For something low-gravity like an ordinary bitter, I would tend to mash it hotter to try to keep it from being too 'thin' or watery.
 

CBBaron

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beergears said:
EdWort's Haus Ale, first AG, today...

I guess i was subconsciously trying to find an excuse for missing my temp target.. :)

No, seriously, I think I saw a post from Orfy saying he mashes at 155-156 because he likes a little more body, or, at least, that's how I recall it.
Yes you will get more body and sweetness but that may not seem maltier. Many people consider malty and body to be two separate components of beer. A higher mash temp results in more body. Additional Munich or Aromatic malt or doing a decotion increase maltiness.

Craig
 
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beergears

beergears

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Many people consider malty and body to be two separate components of beer.

Reviving an old thread here, as I was revisiting my newbie notes (the lazy way, sub'd threads!)


This may sound stupid, but could someone please explain the differences between maltiness and body (mouthfeel)?
 

BierMuncher

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Don't forget there are two factors in determining the attenuation and final "body" of the beer.

Mash temp.
Total Mash time.

Even if you mash at 159 degrees, if you extend the mash time out to 90 minutes, the beer will attenuate much further than if you were to mash for 35-45 minutes.

For more malty profiles, mash at 155-156 and hold your mash time to no more than 30-45 minutes.
 

blacklab

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Isn't carb level also a component of mouthfeel? Higher carbed beers tend to have more mouthfeel?
 

BigEd

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For a given recipe and grain bill, is it correct to say that raising mash water temp a little bit (152->154) should bring out a bit more maltiness in the beer, ultimately?
I would say no. A higher temp mash will enhance the body of the beer by creating a higher percentage of longer chain sugars and dextrins but this isn't going to change the flavor of the beer. Maltiness comes from the malt in the recipe.
 

menschmaschine

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I would say no. A higher temp mash will enhance the body of the beer by creating a higher percentage of longer chain sugars and dextrins but this isn't going to change the flavor of the beer. Maltiness comes from the malt in the recipe.
I agree with this. Maltiness and body are two different things. Jamil talks about this in several episodes. Take a Munich Helles, for example. Lots of maltiness and FG as low as 1.008. I don't think, as a generality, that higher mash temps = more maltiness.
 

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