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Rack to Secondary...home under COVID quarantine!!

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Wife tested positive last Monday. Kids and I are quarantined for 14 days. She’s staying to two isolated areas of the house.
Everything beer is downstairs in the basement. Am I safe racking to secondary downstairs?
TIA! Cheers
 

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Are you asking a beer question or a medical question? If it's the latter I'd suggest asking elsewhere.

That said, if you're not breathing each other's air you're probably OK. And you didn't say if the basement was one of her areas either, by the way.

Oh, and stay safe.
 
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Are you asking a beer question or a medical question? If it's the latter I'd suggest asking elsewhere.

That said, if you're not breathing each other's air you're probably OK. And you didn't say if the basement was one of her areas either, by the way.

Oh, and stay safe.
Ha! Just a beer question. She has virtually no symptoms and hasn’t had a fever at all. She has not been in the basement at all.
Thanks!
 
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Don’t rack to secondary. That’s not because of covid. Just don’t do it regardless.

Read forums on why
I will research.
I’ve never had any problems. Been brewing since ‘93. I’m certainly not bottling for a couple weeks. Want to let the house ‘air out’, change filters etc...
I don’t want to leave this blonde sitting too long on the yeast. Brewed last Friday. Had a super active fermentation that started quick (less than 12 hours) and sitting between 66-67 degrees.
 

doug293cz

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Thanks for posting that. I knew it already, but didn’t know why.

I don’t understand why beer kit instruction sheets still tell people to secondary.
Most of the instructions were written long ago, and haven't been updated with modern information.

Brew on :mug:
 

Jtvann

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Most of the instructions were written long ago, and haven't been updated with modern information.

Brew on :mug:
I get that. What I mean is that, in my opinion, it’s just utter laziness for literally all the companies to continue to use this old out dated crap. Seriously, open up Microsoft word and just hit delete on the secondary section if nothing else.
 

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I don’t want to leave this blonde sitting too long on the yeast. Brewed last Friday. Had a super active fermentation that started quick (less than 12 hours) and sitting between 66-67 degrees.
Too long on the yeast for homebrew quantities is defined as several months. Leave the blond where it is.
 

BrewnWKopperKat

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Seriously, open up Microsoft word and just hit delete on the secondary section if nothing else.
FWIW, I did a spot check of online instructions for number of popular kits from a couple of the big online home brew stores. Most either 1) didn't mention secondary or 2) make it clear secondary was optional.

What would be more interesting, however, would be a scoring rubric for "modern" brewing instructions. One could then either 1) build an AI to automagically score instructions or 2) write a "model" process to brew from.
 

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Agreed that all evidence points to leaving things in the primary for quite a while, a month at least. Pull that in to 2 or 3 weeks if you're really scared, but a week is nothing. Might even help to let it sit a bit more to clean up.
 
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Over in the AHA forums, there is an "Ask the Experts" forum. Ask the Experts: John Palmer, reply #5 talks specifically about transferring to a secondary container.
Very good info, thanks! As I said, started brewing in ‘93. My how things have changed!! Since my kids have come along, 17 years ago, I’m only doing 2-3 brews a year. Therefore not really keen to all the advancements of our art.
thanks again!
 
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Most of the instructions were written long ago, and haven't been updated with modern information.

Brew on :mug:
I’m using my notes and 27 year old process knowledge when I brew. It’s quite obvious that the basic science of brewing hasn’t changed, but the equipment and ingredients have. No longer do we have to tear open a foil yeast packet or two! Makes total sense that today’s yeasts are cleaner, stronger and safer to let your beer sit on in a primary fermenter.
Thanks!
 
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FWIW, I did a spot check of online instructions for number of popular kits from a couple of the big online home brew stores. Most either 1) didn't mention secondary or 2) make it clear secondary was optional.

What would be more interesting, however, would be a scoring rubric for "modern" brewing instructions. One could then either 1) build an AI to automagically score instructions or 2) write a "model" process to brew from.
Interesting idea. For beginners, I can see how the outdated instructions could cause harm to their first couple attempts at brewing and perhaps cause them to want to give up.
Again, fingers crossed, I’ve been lucky racking to a secondary over the years. This Blonde will be my first primary to bottling batch ever.
 

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This Blonde will be my first primary to bottling batch ever.
I hear ya, old habits developed over literally decades are hard to break. All the old stuff applies like being sure fermentation is done and so on, cleanliness, whatever. But it's turned out that things can sit in the primary far longer than earlier believed. It was always - let things finish in secondary so the yeast cake doesn't funk up the beer while you wait. Now it's - let things finish in primary because it turns out the yeast cake doesn't actually hurt anything at all (within reason of course).
 
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I hear ya, old habits developed over literally decades are hard to break. Now it's - let things finish in primary because it turns out the yeast cake doesn't actually hurt anything at all (within reason of course).
I’ll bottle on the same schedule directly from primary. For what I’m producing, homebrew, I’m not overly concerned with super clarity anyway. If I ever decide to step into the market, that’s a different story.
 

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Agreed that all evidence points to leaving things in the primary for quite a while, a month at least. Pull that in to 2 or 3 weeks if you're really scared, but a week is nothing. Might even help to let it sit a bit more to clean up.
What are the benefits of leaving it 4+ weeks in primary? If the fermentation was done in, say, 4 or 5 days, would there be that much more cleanup in 3 extra weeks as opposed to 1 or 2?
 

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What are the benefits of leaving it 4+ weeks in primary? If the fermentation was done in, say, 4 or 5 days, would there be that much more cleanup in 3 extra weeks as opposed to 1 or 2?
It is beer and yeast dependent. Some are done quickly (pale ale with high floc yeast), some take seemingly forever (my Russian Imperial with low flocculating yeast). I mostly meant that you don't need to worry about anything bad happening over a longer time frame.
 

BrewnWKopperKat

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I’m only doing 2-3 brews a year. Therefore not really keen to all the advancements of our art.
If your current process is producing beer you enjoy, there may not be a compelling reason to change.

For beginners, I can see how the outdated instructions could cause harm to their first couple attempts at brewing and perhaps cause them to want to give up.
It's certainly a possibility. Of the various forums that I watch, Homebrew Talk seems to have a belief that kit instructions are bad/wrong/out-dated. Maybe some day, some one will develop that recipe scoring rubric to prove (or dis-prove) that belief.
 
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