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Questions Related to Recent Brew (Pressure "lager")

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SouthPhillyBr3w3r

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I recently brewed a beer that is in the style of a Schwarzbier (no cold fermentation, german ale yeast). I will list the recipe and techniques, then I have a few questions.

Batch Size 4.5 Gal
Est. ABV= 4.8%
90 min Boil

Grist
4 lb German Pilsner
4 lb Munich Malt
6 oz Crystal 40L
7 oz Midnight Wheat
3 oz Chocolate Malt
(Mash light malts 60 min. Add dark malts for last 10 min of mash)
Hops
1 oz Tettnanger (60 min)
0.5 oz Hersbrucker (15 min)
0.5 oz Hersbrucker (0 min)

After Chilling to 63'F, I transferred to Corny keg, aerated with pure O2, and pitched 350mL of dense slurry WY1007 German Ale. I added 5-10 drops Fermcap S and the keg was then sealed, pressurized to 15 psi, and a spunding valve was installed. The beer has been fermenting at 15 psi at 65'F for 8 days.

MY QUESTIONS TO YOU:

  1. Do you have any experience fermenting this way?
  2. How long should I allow primary fermentation to continue?
  3. Should I eject the yeast cake from the keg and continue to secondary?
  4. Should I just leave it on primary for another week before cold crashing, transferring to a serving keg, and fining with gelatin?
  5. Should I allow the beer to cold condition for a few weeks before serving, rather than burst carbing and serving once cold?

Thoughts? Opinions? Questions? Concerns?
Once I have tasted the beer, I will create a recipe thread with tasting notes, etc.
 

seatazzz

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Here you go:

1. No, but the concept is the same as fermenting in a carboy or bucket. You want to avoid introducing oxygen as much as possible, this is a good way to do that. One issue you may have is the dip tube might get clogged up with yeast and trub, unless you clip it off so it's above the trub.
2. Until you get two consecutive gravity readings over at least two days that are the same, indicating fermentation is complete. Taking gravity samples from a keg might be a challenge.
3. No, just transfer carefully. Start the transfer without the serving keg hooked up, and let the beer run until it's clear, then hook up your serving keg and let er rip.
4. I would add the gelatin before transferring, that way you're leaving more of the guck in the primary keg.
5. You can, that's up to you. Your recipe should come out pretty dark and malty, letting it condition a few weeks would probably let the flavors meld together better. Once again, avoid introducing oxygen (purge it with co2). Taste it when your're ready to transfer, and decide what you want it to be.
 
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SouthPhillyBr3w3r

SouthPhillyBr3w3r

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Here you go:

1. No, but the concept is the same as fermenting in a carboy or bucket. You want to avoid introducing oxygen as much as possible, this is a good way to do that. One issue you may have is the dip tube might get clogged up with yeast and trub, unless you clip it off so it's above the trub.
2. Until you get two consecutive gravity readings over at least two days that are the same, indicating fermentation is complete. Taking gravity samples from a keg might be a challenge.
3. No, just transfer carefully. Start the transfer without the serving keg hooked up, and let the beer run until it's clear, then hook up your serving keg and let er rip.
4. I would add the gelatin before transferring, that way you're leaving more of the guck in the primary keg.
5. You can, that's up to you. Your recipe should come out pretty dark and malty, letting it condition a few weeks would probably let the flavors meld together better. Once again, avoid introducing oxygen (purge it with co2). Taste it when your're ready to transfer, and decide what you want it to be.
Thanks! Advice common to brewing, but sometimes I over think things. Thanks for reminding me that it's just beer and the process isn't really different.
 
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