Question regarding late malt additions....

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Teufelhunde

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Today I cooked up an extract recipe that called for a 15 minute addition of 3lbs DME. It got me to wondering why specify a late add? Why not just put it all in at the beginning of the boil? Does it really make all that much difference? What kind of difference?

TIA for all of the forthcoming input....

Lon
 

BrewnWKopperKat

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How to Brew, 4e, offers two approaches to brewing with extract. One is a full volume boil (with all the extract added at the start of the boil). The other is "stove top" brewing - use half the water / extract at the start start of the boil, add the rest of the extract at the end of the boil, and "top off/up" with water to get to the desired batch size.

The strength of the "stove top" brewing approach is that people can try homebrewing (and make good beer) with existing kitchen equipment. No need to initially buy a big kettle and a strong heat source to boil a full volume wort.

One can also shorten the boil time. American Pale Ale - 15 Minute Cascade Pale Ale (started in 2010), Basic Brewing Radio's "Hop Sampler" (2018), and the "no-boil" recipe (2019) threads may be of interest.
 

kartracer2

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Hi @Teufelhunde
A thing about late malt additions is that your wort won't darken as much. It's more important with lighter colored beers but it affects all of them to some extent. It's more important with partial than full boils.
I seldom (never really) full boil all my extract, 1/2 at most and usually only about a 1/3rd of the total to start out. When the boil (flame out) is done I pull the hop bag and then add the rest of the extract while still hot. It has worked for me with out any problems. It also reduces scorching that can happen when adding extract.(more an issue with LME as it tends to sink to the bottom more than DME)
Now the possible down side is that you my end up with a more hoppy (bitter) beer. As wort density rises, hop utilization goes down. That said, if the recipe calls for late extract additions, hop utilization probably has been figured in to it.
Hope this helps,
Cheers, :mug:
Joel B.
 

D.B.Moody

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As @BrewnWKopperKat said you can use this to shorten boil times, which is why I recently tried a late addition and will do so in my next planned brews.
As @kartracer2 said, the kit you have presumably figured it in. Adding it at the start will make you beer less bitter than the kit intended it to be.
Just so you know, adding DME to a hot wort will create cloud that'll settle stickily all over, so pour carefully and have a lid ready. (I dissolve my DME before adding it to avoid this. I'm married and brew in the kitchen. :) )
 
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