Question about using pineapple into a NEIPA...

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Garage12brewing

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Hi everyone,

I would like to brew a pretty standard NEIPA recipe using some Citra, Galaxy and Mosaic I have in my freezer. To be different than my usual NEIPA I would like to use some pineapple puree into the fermenter once the fermentation will be over.

I plan to use about 7,5 pounds of Dole canned pineapple puree into my 5 gallons batch. ( which might contain some sugar )

Once the beer have been in contact with the pineapple for about 10 days... can I bottle the beer as usual using my priming sugar or the yeast will be dead because of the contact with the pineapple... ? If this beer was intended to go in a keg that wouldnt be a problem but I want to bottle it...

I have some CBC-1 priming/cask yeast that I could use...

Thanks for sharing your experience !
 

Jag75

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You can bottle like normal. Just make sure fermentation is done because the sugar from the fruit will kick up fermentation again.
 

day_trippr

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I had to Google this notion that pineapple kills yeast due to its high acidity/low pH. Haven't found that notion substantiated.

What I did find is the "bromelain" enzyme thing. Impressive! I would definitely want to use pasteurized fruit - whether bought that way (canned) or made that way at home "on the range" - because it's a body/head/everything killer :)

Cheers!
 
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Garage12brewing

Garage12brewing

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I had to Google this notion that pineapple kills yeast due to its high acidity/low pH. Haven't found that notion substantiated.

What I did find is the "bromelain" enzyme thing. Impressive! I would definitely want to use pasteurized fruit - whether bought that way (canned) or made that way at home "on the range" - because it's a body/head/everything killer :)

Cheers!
Thanks for the reply. So this mean that I will need to pasteurie the canned fruit too ?
 

Hwk-I-St8

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I had to Google this notion that pineapple kills yeast due to its high acidity/low pH. Haven't found that notion substantiated.

What I did find is the "bromelain" enzyme thing. Impressive! I would definitely want to use pasteurized fruit - whether bought that way (canned) or made that way at home "on the range" - because it's a body/head/everything killer :)

Cheers!
Is that the enzyme that turns ham to mush? My son showed me a video....kinda creepy.
 

day_trippr

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That could have been either bromelain or papain (the latter from papaya) as they're both often found in "meat tenderizers" :)

Cheers!
 

DuncB

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We actually use a product made from pineapple to debride burns chemically. It's pretty destructive stuff.
Very painful process they need to be asleep or numbed up in the area it's applied to.
Intellectually elegant but practically quite challenging.

Might consider some kind of pineapple flavouring as the safest option.

Pineapple is Certainly a great way to tenderise cheap meat cuts.
 

day_trippr

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Meh. There are all kinds of ingredients that need some attention for best results, pineapple is no different - though perhaps with more dramatic effects should one not follow the popular guidance :D

And to that end it is clear it can be completely tamed - and conveniently with the simple application of the pasteurization heat vs time curve. Bromelain denatures at 60°C/140°F which is a useful point on said curve as it isn't so warm as to flash off more delicate characters. So, buy canned and the work is already done, or go with fresh fruit treated to 140°F for 15 minutes on the stove top, which should take care of both common bugs and the enzyme...

Cheers!
 

LarMoeCur

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Y'all are correct. Pineapples are very acidic 3-4 pH range. If you finished beer is around the 4.5-4.6 pH range then adding 7.5 pounds of pineapple puree will for sure lower the pH to the point where the beer will taste very acidic. If I were adding that much pineapple, I would watch my water additions closely. I would gently acidify my mash and sparge to have my beer finish at 4.8-5.0 pH range. I would then add enough pineapple to have my beer finish no lower than 4.4 pH.

On a side note. 7.5 pounds of pineapple in a 5 gallon batch is way, way to much IMO. 3 cups of juice only will carry the pineapple flavor into the beer. 6 cups of juice it will be a pineapple bomb.
 
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