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Question about one step.

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Vampyre

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Well when i first made up the wort i let everything soak with 1 step in my fermenter. 1 tablespoon per gallon. i then with out thinking just rinsed all the stuff off in hot hot hot water. poured the wort in and let it sit.

So as i was reading more i relized that you dont need to rinse it. So when it came time to transfer from primary to 2nd carboy i just let the carboy soak for a while then siphoned all the one setp, about 5 gallons, to a rubber maid bin and let all the tubes and other stuff in there while i drained out the carboy till there was no more drops. then shook off all the tubes and stuff to get most of all the sanitizer off. then transfered to the carboy.

so i let the tubs and what not soak over night after i wased out the primary and put the one step from the rubbermaid bin to the primary and let everything soak over night. morning came i emptyed out the primary and put everything into the bin. Well today i went to where i keep all the stuff and where there where drops of the one step water left ont eht tubes there was now a residue of one step in all thoes spots. i tasted it and it was a salty bitter taste to it.

So my question is when i go to clean the bottles should i rinse them off or just leave them as dry as possible before i start bottling. I dont want my beer tasting like one step.

I KNOW I KNOW I KNOW. dont worry, Have.........................

but what do you guys and gals think sould i rinse after soaking with one step? or will that residue not even effect the taste of the beer? all the people that use blech have to rinse like crazy and i never read about them haveing infections from the tap water.

Or maybe a better question would be has anyone ever tasted one step in your beer or have the be what ruined your batch.
 

Janx

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Switch to Iodophor. No rinse. Cheaper. No residue left over.

I have limited experience with one step, but I have always found Iodophor to address the issues you describe. Cheers :D
 

SwAMi75

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As a general rule, I'll rinse it off if I've got the time and I know it's clean. This is assuming that the powder has fully dissolved.

Like Janx, I switched to Iodophor. Again, I'll still give a quick rinse if I know it's clean just because....but I don't have to worry about whether or not it's dissolved.
 

awillis

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I think all the one step was not dissolved. If you have time just give a quick rinse with your bottle washer(if you have one) and let dry. Also, take the time to look into other cleaners and sanitizers. You may find one that fits your brewing system better. Personally, I do worry about the residues and give a rinse with cold water and let air dry. Thats my two cents!
 

bikebryan

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Sam75 said:
As a general rule, I'll rinse it off if I've got the time and I know it's clean. This is assuming that the powder has fully dissolved.

Like Janx, I switched to Iodophor. Again, I'll still give a quick rinse if I know it's clean just because....but I don't have to worry about whether or not it's dissolved.
Why rinse after using Iodophor? You are actually doing more harm than good.
 

Punn

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You are like I am and being overly sanitary. Figure you rinse it with your tap water its not bad, Because you used tap water in you beer, well if u used tap, I know I did. The one-step is to kill wild yeast and such that makes bad beer. Use it to clean, and then rinse with the same water u used for you beer. And not worry I say. You sound like you are being really clean, so it should be ok!
 

DeRoux's Broux

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bikebryan said:
Why rinse after using Iodophor? You are actually doing more harm than good.
true! soak it in iodophor and let it dry while you brew. easy enough. :D
 

Janx

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You definitely do not want to rinse after Iodophor. You are negating the sanitation you have just achieved. That's the whole point.

Definitely do not use a sanitizer that needs rinsing. You want the last thing to touch your equipment to be sanitizer before it touches beer or cooled wort.

Cheers :D
 

SwAMi75

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I don't see where the harm could be....I'm not talking about letting it dry first. I pick it up out of the pan of Iodopher solution, rinse it off, and use it.

If it were sanitized to begin with, I don't see how rinsing the solution off of it could do any harm.
 

bikebryan

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Sam75 said:
I don't see where the harm could be....I'm not talking about letting it dry first. I pick it up out of the pan of Iodopher solution, rinse it off, and use it.

If it were sanitized to begin with, I don't see how rinsing the solution off of it could do any harm.
Iodophor sanitizes during the drying process. If you are taking your stuff directly out of the iodophor and rinsing it off, then you are pretty much completely negating the sanitization process it affords.
 

tnlandsailor

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bikebryan said:
Iodophor sanitizes during the drying process. If you are taking your stuff directly out of the iodophor and rinsing it off, then you are pretty much completely negating the sanitization process it affords.
?????? Not sure where this is coming from. Iodophor is a contact sanitizer. According to the manufacturer, mixed at a concentration of 12.5 ppm, a 60 second contact time is all that is required for adequate sanitation. Air drying does nothing for sanitation. I've been using this stuff for years without ever letting anything dry and have had no problems. It is the contact with the iodine in solution that actually does the sanitizing.

I have to agree that rinsing after sanitizing is basically undoing what the iodophor did. You might get away with it but the odds are not in your favor. Besides, any residual liquid sanitizer that might find it's way into your wort or finished beer is undetectable. Yes, if you poured several ounces in a pint of beer you might notice something, but we are talking about maybe less than 10 drops in 5 gallons. Read this ariticle:

http://www.homebrew.com/articles/article08290301.shtml

Scroll down to the "not terribly scientific no rinse experiment".
 

bikebryan

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I've been looking for the source where I found that little tidbit - that the drying process was important. The source mentioned that during the drying, iodophor finished breaking down cell walls of the little microscopic nasties. Unfortunately, I can't find that source anymore. So I'll have to go along with you since I can't prove my point!

However, we do both agree that rinsing after iodophor is counterproductive to the sanitizing process!
 
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