purpose of a starter?

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bringitonhome

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what's the purpose of a starter? Is it to introduce actively fermenting yeast into your wort so there is no lag time, or is it simply too add a large volume of yeast so that they don't have to do as much reproduction?

I made a 1/2 gallon starter but my brew day got postponed, so after fermentation was done, just put it in the fridge for two weeks. On brew day, i just decanted off the dme from the top and pitched the slurry into my wort.

Did i defeat the purpose?
 

McKBrew

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This will answer some of your questions.

While opinions will vary, a properly stored starter should be fine at two weeks. You'll still accomplish the main objective.
 

Joker

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Pitching higher cell count
Verifying your yeast is ready to go to work
Faster start to fermenting
Im sure there are others but these came to mind first.
 

Grinder12000

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Sort of the same question here maybe.

I see I will be using the same yeast for my next 3 or 4 brews White labs California Ale 001 - can I just buy one tube - make a starter and then keep splitting that starter?

Put one half in the frig for using a a week or so, then make another starter, split it and so forth??
 

jacksonbrown

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I see I will be using the same yeast for my next 3 or 4 brews White labs California Ale 001 - can I just buy one tube - make a starter and then keep splitting that starter?
I think you might just be better off pitching onto the yeast cake. Although it probably won't matter much either way. But I would suggest might you beers in order of strength (lighter first, then darker and more bitter), then pitch fresh wort on the old cake. If you were set on making a starter, then I would think your best bet would be to make a 4 qt starter. Then split that into two equal batches od 2 qt, and grow those to 4 also. Then you have two 4 qt starters, and you can reuse those yeast cakes once their done fermenting. Should save you some time and engery.
 

flyangler18

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I see I will be using the same yeast for my next 3 or 4 brews White labs California Ale 001 - can I just buy one tube - make a starter and then keep splitting that starter?

Put one half in the frig for using a a week or so, then make another starter, split it and so forth??
I'd either pitch onto the cake of the preceding batch or do some yeast washing.
 

Saccharomyces

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I'd either pitch onto the cake of the preceding batch or do some yeast washing.
I'd be paranoid about sanitation and wash the yeast splitting it into 4 jars. That gives you five for one with one propagation. Splitting the starter will propagate the yeast through successive generations and leaves more potential exposure to contamination.
 

flyangler18

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I'd be paranoid about sanitation and wash the yeast splitting it into 4 jars.
Yeah, you do have really be scrupulous about your sanitation if you are going to be reusing yeast, and be absolutely positive that the preceding batch didn't have any sort of infection.

Grinder- yeast washing is the way to go. Check out the sticky.
 
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