Quantcast

Pumpkin Honey Mead

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

davetitley2003

New Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2016
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
19/11/2016

900g honey
500g sugar
Fresh Pumpkin Flesh cut up and boiled, both flesh and boiled water added.


started this experiment at the end of Halloween as the shops were selling the pumpkins off super cheap even tho they were fresh.

So far brewing nicely.
 

livingoutloud

New Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2017
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
this sounds delicious, thinking of starting it this October. Did you put pumpkin in at the start, or after first fermentation? How did it turn out?
 

Beerzilla

Active Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2011
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
Halloween is around the corner! How did it turn out?
 

coebrewing

New Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2017
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Stumbeld across this thread! I would be super interested to know how this panned out. Think I might brew some this year but may add some spices. I'll post my recipe if I do! :)
 

bernardsmith

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2012
Messages
5,206
Reaction score
1,688
Location
Saratoga Springs
Cannot figure out why the OP used sugar. No mention of yeast used and I would think that simply adding pumpkin flesh would not produce the flavor that is likely being sought after - not so much "pumpkin" (you could use any winter squash) but the spices associated with pumpkin pie (cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and perhaps cloves).
 

Dan O

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Messages
179
Reaction score
76
Location
HAMPSTEAD
Cannot figure out why the OP used sugar. No mention of yeast used and I would think that simply adding pumpkin flesh would not produce the flavor that is likely being sought after - not so much "pumpkin" (you could use any winter squash) but the spices associated with pumpkin pie (cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and perhaps cloves).
I know this is an old thread, & the OP hasn't been seen since 9 days after he posted this, but, I can't help but wonder a few things about it myself. As well as the spices being absent, & whatever yeast was used, I'm curious how much more pumpkin flavor you could get if you were to cut up the pumpkin, then roast it vs. boiling it, & add it to primary. I believe you could get a lot more flavor out of the pumpkin that way. I have some pumpkin blossom honey that has a pumpkin spice mead written all over it.

My question is, is there a particular kind of pumpkin that should be used? Or is there a type that should be avoided?

Thank you, in advance, to ANYONE who takes time to answer this.
I have a funny feeling I'm going to be trying a tweeked by me version of this relatively soon, so it has a few months to age before fall of 2021 arrives.
 

Raptor99

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2020
Messages
46
Reaction score
24
In fall 2019 I made a pumpkin wine. The first think is to be sure to use an eating/pie pumpkin rather than a jack-o-lantern pumpkin. The flavor will be much better. I peeled, chopped, and simmered the pumpkin until it started to get soft. Then I let it cool, mashed it, and added both the pumpkin and liquid to the fermenter. I also added some typical pumpkin pie spices. I wasn't that excited about how it turned out, but I might eventually try it again.
 

bernardsmith

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2012
Messages
5,206
Reaction score
1,688
Location
Saratoga Springs
In my opinion, you could use just about any winter squash and extract the same or very similar flavor and winter squashes seem to have a far longer shelf life than pumpkins (though, in fact, my understanding is that canned pumpkins are not literally pumpkins but whatever squashes are to hand). And as I suggest, the flavor one looks for in a pumpkin beer (and presumably a wine or mead) is the flavor from the associated spices and not the "pumpkin" itself.
 

madscientist451

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 10, 2014
Messages
4,588
Reaction score
2,225
Location
Bedford
Haven't tried it, but I've heard that if you are using real pumpkin, roasting, puree and then racking onto it in secondary is the best method for flavor. Or you could just be a cheater:
1614090846166.png
 

Dan O

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Messages
179
Reaction score
76
Location
HAMPSTEAD
In my opinion, you could use just about any winter squash and extract the same or very similar flavor and winter squashes seem to have a far longer shelf life than pumpkins (though, in fact, my understanding is that canned pumpkins are not literally pumpkins but whatever squashes are to hand). And as I suggest, the flavor one looks for in a pumpkin beer (and presumably a wine or mead) is the flavor from the associated spices and not the "pumpkin" itself.
I think I will look into the winter squashes a little more closely.😉
 

Dan O

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Messages
179
Reaction score
76
Location
HAMPSTEAD
In fall 2019 I made a pumpkin wine. The first think is to be sure to use an eating/pie pumpkin rather than a jack-o-lantern pumpkin. The flavor will be much better. I peeled, chopped, and simmered the pumpkin until it started to get soft. Then I let it cool, mashed it, and added both the pumpkin and liquid to the fermenter. I also added some typical pumpkin pie spices. I wasn't that excited about how it turned out, but I might eventually try it again.
I'm curious. How much liquid did you wind up losing with the mashed pumpkin? I was thinking the roasted chunks would be easier to remove if put in a brew bag & it would minimize the loss of precious mead.
 
Last edited:

jtratcliff

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
1,844
Reaction score
683
Location
Pasadena
We got it sometime around Halloween or maybe Thanksgiving ... and it's stayed good thru our mild SoCal winter... just roasted and pureed it last week..
 

Dan O

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Messages
179
Reaction score
76
Location
HAMPSTEAD
Also, if anyone can answer, if I were to roast pumpkins or a squash, would/should they have the outer skins removed before going into primary?

Would there be any tannic values or would it cause a bitterness, like say orange pith does?
Thanks, in advance, for anybody's reply.
 

jtratcliff

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
1,844
Reaction score
683
Location
Pasadena
hmm... I've never tried it with leaving the skin on....

I've always either peeled before roasting if I want chunks, or roasted with skin on and then scraped out after for puree...
 

Dan O

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Messages
179
Reaction score
76
Location
HAMPSTEAD
I wasn't sure, that's why I asked. This would be an experiment for me, as I have not yet worked with pumpkin or even any squash for that matter, for a mead. The thought of the puree makes me lean more towards the roasted chunks. I always try to minimize the loss of product, & I know the loss would be more with puree over chunks. I understand it creates more surface to ferment with puree, but, again, just trying to keep as much liquid gold as possible.
 

Karn

Active Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2021
Messages
25
Reaction score
7
I've made pumpkin and muskmelon wines. There was no doubt as to what flavor they were (very strong), still good.
 

Karn

Active Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2021
Messages
25
Reaction score
7
Never heard of muskmelon. Did you mix those 2 flavors together? Where did you get the muskmelon?
I'm in Michigan. Muskmelon is also called Honey Dew; it grows very well up here. I didn't mix the two flavors. I 'experiment' with 'extra's' from the garden :)
 

Karn

Active Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2021
Messages
25
Reaction score
7
I'm in Michigan. Muskmelon is also called Honey Dew; it grows very well up here. I didn't mix the two flavors. I 'experiment' with 'extra's' from the garden :)
There are many varieties of melon. What we call muskmelon have a rough off-white exterior that kinda looks like a net covering the light orange/yellow melon. I believe cantaloupes are smooth skinned and can be orangish or blue colored.
 

frankhillersr

Active Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2013
Messages
32
Reaction score
4
Location
Eastampton
Dan, I have done a number of pumpkin beers, and a braggot. I cube the pumpkin, sprinkle it with brown sugar, and roast until it softens a bit. With the spices, I make a vodka tincture, and add to taste after fermentation.
 

Dan O

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Messages
179
Reaction score
76
Location
HAMPSTEAD
There are many varieties of melon. What we call muskmelon have a rough off-white exterior that kinda looks like a net covering the light orange/yellow melon. I believe cantaloupes are smooth skinned and can be orangish or blue colored.
Cantaloupe has a rough exterior, but, the color of the skins are correct. Thank you for the clarification, I appreciate it.
 

Dan O

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Messages
179
Reaction score
76
Location
HAMPSTEAD
Dan, I have done a number of pumpkin beers, and a braggot. I cube the pumpkin, sprinkle it with brown sugar, and roast until it softens a bit. With the spices, I make a vodka tincture, and add to taste after fermentation.
I hadn't thought of using vodka for a tincture, but, it may be worth trying @ least once. Usually the only thing I use vodka for is my airlocks.
 
Top