Pruning bines...

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I understand that I shouldn’t prune my first year growth of bines so do I let them grow throughout next season or do I prune them in the spring when the new shoots start growing?
 

DuncB

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Not sure, I'm in the spring down here ( or maybe early summer as we're a month off the longest day ) hard to decide with the rain and mist outside.
I am just letting every shoot grow at the moment to strengthen the root mass for next seasons growth. But none of my shoots are higher than 4 ft yet.
 
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I planted seven rhizomes in each of two very large plant pots this time last year which grew up the front of my south-facing house. They reached 5+ metres to the roof via a trellis and then an old tv arial lead but I did feed them every 5 days and was amazed at the bountiful crop of large cones given that I was advised to not expect a large crop. There were sufficient to make a brew, store 4 more brews worth in the freezer, give some away and then as many to die on the bine.

They’re now looking a bit of a mess but I’m leaving them as advised to allow the roots to strengthen but I’m in a quandary about whether to prune them next spring or whether to leave them right through next season’s growth. If I do leave them then next season's growth will tangle with the dead ones which might be detrimental to them re funguses etc.

So back to the question: when should I cut this first year's growth back?
 

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I've been following the info on the site I bought my plants from.


The links are good as well.

They have a timeline ( for south hemisphere so you need to translate that) .

This mentions the process of wintering down ( may here ) which might help you.
 
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I've been following the info on the site I bought my plants from.


The links are good as well.

They have a timeline ( for south hemisphere so you need to translate that) .

This mentions the process of wintering down ( may here ) which might help you.
That’s very informative and thank you for that.

However, what I want to know about is whether one leaves the bines from the first year’s growth intact throughout the second year’s growth or does one cut them down just before the second year’s growth. I envisage quite a tangled mess if I don’t cut them at all but the advice is to leave them to nourish the roots.
 

DuncB

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I think they will all die back judging by those pictures so once that has occurred looks like you need to cut it all away ready for the next growth.

Email them at wild about hops ( he's a Brit ) very helpful when I spoke to him on the phone.
 

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They’re now looking a bit of a mess but I’m leaving them as advised to allow the roots to strengthen but I’m in a quandary about whether to prune them next spring or whether to leave them right through next season’s growth. If I do leave them then next season's growth will tangle with the dead ones which might be detrimental to them re funguses etc.
The "do not prune bines for new plants" advice applies to the spring growth (assuming you are in the northern hemisphere). In the fall you should trim up the plants and cut them back to the ground. Hops are perennials, and the growth will die back each growing season.
Once hops are established, in the spring you would trim back any of the early "bull" bines and then leave only a few (around 3) bines to grow. This is the step you skip for new plants for the first year or two.
 
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The "do not prune bines for new plants" advice applies to the spring growth (assuming you are in the northern hemisphere). In the fall you should trim up the plants and cut them back to the ground. Hops are perennials, and the growth will die back each growing season.
Once hops are established, in the spring you would trim back any of the early "bull" bines and then leave only a few (around 3) bines to grow. This is the step you skip for new plants for the first year or two.
That’s great advice, many thanks for that. Job done!
 

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superiorsat

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I understand that I shouldn’t prune my first year growth of bines so do I let them grow throughout next season or do I prune them in the spring when the new shoots start growing?
I pruned mine close to the ground just before 2nd year new growth started. I read on here somewhere that the first year the roots will draw nutrients out of the bines to strengthen the roots for the first winter. Second year on is not needed as they are well established.
 
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I pruned mine close to the ground just before 2nd year new growth started. I read on here somewhere that the first year the roots will draw nutrients out of the bines to strengthen the roots for the first winter. Second year on is not needed as they are well established.
Thanks for that, perhaps I’ve done it too early. Anyhow, it’s done now and there’s nowt I can do about it.
 

superiorsat

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Your probably fine. Had another person say cover with mulch or something to help insulate for the first winter. Mine are in pine bark covered beds but I never do anything extra.
 
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Your probably fine. Had another person say cover with mulch or something to help insulate for the first winter. Mine are in pine bark covered beds but I never do anything extra.
I’ve covered the pots with a layer of leaves and will add compost over the leaves tomorrow.
 

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Mine are looking a bit more healthy now with new growth appearing and good colour to the leaves. I got two plants both came in soil the EKG was in a3 litre pot and was 1-2 years old, so I'm not sure if I should treat this as an older plant and perhaps select the prime bines for training. Currently I'm letting it all grow to encourage the root mass development, feeding and watering lots.
 

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Yikes can't see that my hops are going to be much more than six foot high by then.
None of the interleaf gaps are anywhere near 12 inches apart. Might be the variety.
 

superiorsat

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Only thing I would say is don't cut more than you want to leave to go up the rope or trellis. People always say more will come up don't worry, as that is not always the case. I ran 4 bines on all my ropes this year with the exception of one that only had 3 because I cut more off before others had come up and 3 was all I got on that one.
 
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