Protein rest and oats

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snailsongs

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Is it really necessary or beneficial to do a protein rest (122F) for a couple pounds of oats in an oatmeal stout? What is the benefit vs just doing a single infusion mash at 154F?

also, are flaked oats that you buy at LHBS mash ready or do you need to cook them and or/crush them?
 

pompeiisneaks

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From Palmer:

How to Brew - By John Palmer - The Protein Rest and Modification
The typical Protein Rest at 120 - 130°F is used to break up proteins which might otherwise cause chill haze and can improve the head retention. This rest should only be used when using moderately-modified malts, or when using fully modified malts with a large proportion (>25%) of unmalted grain, e.g. flaked barley, wheat, rye, or oatmeal. Using this rest in a mash consisting mainly of fully modified malts would break up the proteins responsible for body and head retention and result in a thin, watery beer. The standard time for a protein rest is 20 - 30 minutes.
 

lamarguy

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also, are flaked oats that you buy at LHBS mash ready or do you need to cook them and or/crush them?

Depends on whether the oats are raw or pre-gelatinized. I always use instant oats (5 minute oats) from the grocery store in my recipes, which are pre-gelatinized. Most flaked oats available at homebrew shops are pre-gelatinized, but you may want to verify that.

Is it really necessary or beneficial to do a protein rest (122F) for a couple pounds of oats in an oatmeal stout? What is the benefit vs just doing a single infusion mash at 154F?

If you're using raw oats or greater than 10% pre-gelatinized oats in the mash, the recommendation is to do a protein rest at 122F for 20 - 30 minutes. Otherwise, a single infusion mash is sufficient.

Here's a good article on the subject.
 
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