Propane burner benefits

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BREWMANDAN

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I need to buy a propane burner (tired of stove top) for brew day. Does anyone know if there is a difference between a "normal" burner (KAB4) and a one of those multiple jet burners? If so does anyone know the benefits of one over the other? Thanks
 

BrewBeemer

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I would first ask myself how big of batches in gallons you will brew or grow into in the future before selecting a burner. Never say you'll only stay at 5 gallon batches when 10 or 15 isn't that much more in labor. This not counting the added price of materials needed. larger burners will heat a lot faster as well empty the propane bottles faster. I'll shut up now as i'm leaning towards a all electric brewing system not wanting to pay what they are asking for propane these days plus what it might cost in the future. At 11 to 12,000 watts at 240 volts I think I have enough heating power to go electric. JMO's.
 

BarleyWater

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I need to buy a propane burner (tired of stove top) for brew day. Does anyone know if there is a difference between a "normal" burner (KAB4) and a one of those multiple jet burners? If so does anyone know the benefits of one over the other? Thanks
If your talking one of those like 32 jet burners, then that is overkill. A lot of people have gotten those, and end up having to plug several of the jets to avoid hot spots and scorching on the bottom, and the use a lot of propane and waste a lot of heat. Of course my burner sounds like a jet engine when turned up high, so it can't be too effecient either, but it doesn't cause hot spots. I say, get whichever one is cheaper, and if it's the multi burner one, figure out which burners point towards each other, and plug them up.
 
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BREWMANDAN

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Thanks for the input. I will be growing into larger batches in the future so obviously need to get something that will grow with me. Thanks for the info on the multijets, good to know. It appears from what I've read here and other forums that the KAB4 get good comments so that is probably the way I'll go.
 
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The KAB4 is a bit overkill but man it sure does get 10 gallons going something fierce.

olllllo has one and it definately does what it's supposed to.

I use a smaller model of the bayou classic and it works great.
 

TeleTwanger

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SQ14



I'm looking into this one. You can find it at Home Depot.
That's what I have, it rules! I got it for $50 at home depot. It's plenty BTUs, don't know how many but it's enough...They also sell a prettier stainless steel version but it's more money.
 

BrewBeemer

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The last time I looked up both burners the advertized information was 120,000 ans 210,000 BTU's for each different unit.
The sticky part is there has been in the past many different BTU numbers claimed for any given model of burner and by different brewing supply companies. Adding to this when you check the net other suppliers / venders
can show different BTU rating for the same model of burner. Sales pitch?
I may be repeating myself but how much of the flame that is directly contacting the pot or kettle and the flame that goes into the air or is blown to the side will have add a large reduction on applied heat to your pots or kettles. Then add the regulator pressure and any shielding ring between burner and pot to contain them BTU's.
I've used everything from old cast iron hot water heater to antique floor furnace heater burners in the past with no idea of the BTU ratings they put out. Get lucky or skunked had both call me cheap.
To get a near guess of the effective heat to the pot BTU ratings of your burner calculate how long it takes to heat a given amount of water against a given time and the degrees increased. Even a 1,500,000 BTU burner is useless just a waste of propane if you get a slow temp rise during a set time period if a low % of the flame makes contact to the pot.
Trust thy fellow brewers results with their equipment setup used then decide what would work best for you.
 
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BREWMANDAN

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Yeah, I haven't purchased one yet. I have looked at the SQ14 as well as the SP10 Bayou Classic models. They list the SQ14 as 55K and the SP10 as 185K. I don't really know how much BTU's are needed but both burners get good reviews.
 

TeleTwanger

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I use the SQ14 for 5 and 10gal batches. I believe on Bayou Clasic's website they state it is 55k BTU.
That sounds about right...I can get about 8gallons of 150F wort boiling in about 15 min or less at about 50-60% full on, I never timed it but just standing there waiting for the boil over it never seems very long. I have a pretty wide pot though (17") and even I get some flame lickage over the sides so YMMV.

Once the wort is past hot break I turn it down to probably 40-50% where it is really quite. Great burner!
 

sharpstick

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That sounds about right...I can get about 8gallons of 150F wort boiling in about 15 min or less at about 50-60% full on, I never timed it but just standing there waiting for the boil over it never seems very long. I have a pretty wide pot though (17") and even I get some flame lickage over the sides so YMMV.
i have an old antique cast iron burner, no idea how many BTUs. it takes 30 minutes to get 2 gallons(extract kit) to 170 and another 25 to bring to boil in my 14" diameter SS pot.
i wrap a skirt of aluminum foil around the base of the pot and overhanging around the burner for a windscreen.
i get some hot scorch spots on the bottom of the thin SS pot, so i am trying to find a slab of metal of some sort to spread out the heat. maybe an old large frying pan?
 

TeleTwanger

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i have an old antique cast iron burner, no idea how many BTUs. it takes 30 minutes to get 2 gallons(extract kit) to 170 and another 25 to bring to boil in my 14" diameter SS pot.
i wrap a skirt of aluminum foil around the base of the pot and overhanging around the burner for a windscreen.
i get some hot scorch spots on the bottom of the thin SS pot, so i am trying to find a slab of metal of some sort to spread out the heat. maybe an old large frying pan?
Yeah that's struggling. I mash and sparge on an electric stove and it takes less than 30minutes for 2-3 gallons to reach 185F. I think because I have a pot with a sandwhiched bottom (ss/aluminum/copper) that it works really well.
 

AnOldUR

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The Grape and Granary sells this one which looks exactly like mine and they rate it "up to 150,00BTUs" (fwiw)
Got mine from HD. Works great. The box had the "up to 150,00 BTUs" on it also. To get that you have to change the regulator, but for 5 or 10 gallon batches it is not necessary.

Edit:
Comes with a 15, but I think it will take up to a 30psi regulator.
 

Csuho

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i got mine at academy sports for $29.99 for 110k btu and it will bring 4 gal of sparge water to boil in about 15 mins from tap temps. its quick and i haven't had any burning problems either and its fairly efficient burner too i can get about 5 batches off a 20#(17# really) tank of propane . thats heating dough in water, sparge and boil.
 

BrewBeemer

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its quick and i haven't had any burning problems either and its fairly efficient burner too i can get about 5 batches off a 20#(17# really) tank of propane .
Here in the the San Francisco bay area serviced by Blue Rino the sign states 15# fill for your 20# bottle. This must be because of the new style of shut off float valve preventing over fills. And the exchange bottle was $22.99 last time I checked two months ago. Not so cheap for only getting app 3 3/4 gallons of propane. This 3 3/4 gallon fill are the words that came from the Blue Rino delivery drivers mouth, he used to refill bottles until he got his license to deliver propane. They refill around the Stockton area 35 miles east in the central valley area.
At $6.13 a gallon to exchange a empty 'ex 20# now only holding 15# propane these bottles can become costly on refills if running large BTU burners.
My city has natural gas so propanes for the BBQ only and what a difference running of an old full bottle and the newer 15# bottle. Ran out of propane in half the time on the BBQ a big surprise. Many of you brewers across the country must only have large propane tanks for your house and cooking needs.
Better rates filling those large tanks?
Can those large tanks refill your own 20# bottles then transported to your brewing rig? I didn't mean to steal this thread just adding what I found.
 

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