Process Question

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HopSong

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Ok, so I brewed my first kit using unhopped extract.. adding steeping grains, etc.

After the boil, I used my immersion chiller to get the temp down to 70*. Didn't take long.. but, there was a ton of stuff that settled out of the wort. Kind a a light creamy "trub"??? Not sure what to call this stuff that is a combination of hot break matter along with some of the fines that got thru the nylon grain bag.

So the question is:

When I transfer the wort to my Primary.. should I leave this gunk in the boiling pot? I didn't.. I poured it all into the FV.

If this is wrong... should I transfer to a secondary after the brew stabilizes? Or is it OK to leave it in the Primary as I did with my first brew which only had a minor amount of gunk.

Thanks guys.. n gals
 

unionrdr

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If it looked kinda like wet popcorn,it's break material,& will settle out. I use a fine mesh strainer to aerate the wort & strain at the same time.
 
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HopSong

HopSong

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Nah, it's just a white(ish) sludge.. like the bottom of the FV when I rack the beer into bottles... just a LOT more of it than I had with my DIY extract kit.
 

heathermattson

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Im looking for a pecan beer they sell in Amarillo Tx that my husband tried while he was down there. Im tryin to find a way to get it shipped up here to Montana as a surprise for him.....any help?
 

daksin

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It's called the cold break, and it's a sign that you're doing something right. When the temperature drops very very quickly, proteins in suspension coagulate and drop out. Irish moss/whirlfloc can help this. It's the cold break material, and it keeps those proteins out of your beer that will later cause chill haze. That cold break goes on to form most of the trub that isn't yeast sediment.

If you're not cooling your wort fast enough, you won't get a very good cold break, and may need to use some extra measures to get your beer extra extra clear.
 
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