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Problem with pot size?

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underwaterdan

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Forgive the questions, but... I have always brewed in the same pot, but used extracts from Midwest. The new extract I got from Austin home brew calls for 2.5 gallons of water at 150, which leaves me with about .75 gallons head space in my pot. Usually I do just about 2 gallons or so. The directions call for a 5 gallon pot. I wouldn't be worried but there is a HUGE 7lb pale extract bucket that came with the kit. Can I decrease the amount of starting water to just under 2 gallons??
 

JVD_X

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Well - you can probably get away with it but it's going to get very very messy and you won't get a great beer. It's equivalent to two cans of extract and if you have done two cans before you can do a 7 pound bucket. You might even caramelize the wort. I would hate to see a boil-over.

I strongly suggest that you upgrade to a 10 gallon aluminum or stainless steel stockpot (do not go smaller as you will be throwing your money away!!!) and follow the directions. You can get the aluminum ones for $40 to $60 and the stainless steel ones for twice that price, but it may well be the last pot you need.
 

CnnmnSchnpps

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FWIW, I recently brewed a tripel, 3 gallon boil in a 4 gallon pot, dissolving about 14 lbs of solids (12 DME and 2 dextrose). It all fit but definitely needed to be baby-sat all the way through...
 

wilserbrewer

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Yes, you can absolutely decrease the volumes to fit in your pot. If you are working with an undersized kettle, you can also explore the "late extract" method. The directions are merely a guide, don't fret about making minor changes.

Certainly a larger kettle and a full boil are the preferred method. But if you have only have the means for a partial boil, I would say to brew on and concentrate on other areas of the process such as fermentation temps, sanitation etc. etc. I love the old adage that a skilled brewer could make fine beer in his hat.
 

fishnfever

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I strongly suggest that you upgrade to a 10 gallon aluminum or stainless steel stockpot (do not go smaller as you will be throwing your money away!!!) and follow the directions. You can get the aluminum ones for $40 to $60 and the stainless steel ones for twice that price, but it may well be the last pot you need.

:off:
+1 on this. I made that mistake once already. Purchased a pot then later purchased a 11 gallon Bayou clasic ss pot. Wish I saved my money the first time around and just got the 11 gallon pot.
 
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