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Pro/Cons of Aeration AFTER Pitching?

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borders

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I have read instructions providing different techniques regarding when to aerate. Some say to aerate prior to pitching the yeast, some say to aerate immediately after pitching. I have done both and most recently, I have been aerating (stirring/whisking), both immediately before AND immeditately after pitching. I'll usually stir/whisk for a couple minutes at each point. In my experience, I get the best results in terms of shorter lag time and quicker fermentation start when I aerate both before and after.

What are the pro and cons of either aeration method or a combination of both?
 
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I don't think either method has any benefits or drawbacks. You're aerating to get oxygen dissolved into your wort. Whether the yeast is present immediately before or after the act of aerating probably has little to no effect. When you notice better results after aerating both before and after pitching, it's likely because you aerated twice, not because you aerated with yeast present.

Most importantly, don't aerate significantly after you pitch. Once fermentation begins, aeration is likely to oxidize your beer rather than help the yeast.
 
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borders

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Yuri_Rage said:
Most importantly, don't aerate significantly after you pitch. Once fermentation begins, aeration is likely to oxidize your beer rather than help the yeast.

How long after pitching are we talking about? Minutes/hours?
 

knipknup

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The yeasties use oxygen in the wort in the reproducing stage. The more o2, the quicker their population will get to an adequate amount to eat all that sugar and the healthier they will be. The less o2 there is, the slower it goes and the harder it is for the little fellas to reproduce. I believe this also causes some slight off flavors.
Once the yeast is at a good level, the o2 should be consumed and what isn't will be through the fermentation process and outgassing through the airlock. CO2 is heavier than O2, so it will get pushed out if not consumed.
The problem is when you get O2 in the wort after fermentation is complete because there really isn't a sure way to get it out then.
 
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