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Priming sugar in the keg

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dhelegda

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When putting priming sugar in the keg to carbonate, should the beer be at room temperature. I added priming sugar to a keg a while back charged it with CO2 to seal it left it alone for two weeks in the refrigerator. When I hooked it to w CO2 and taps it was flat.
 

Braufessor

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yes - it needs to be warm enough for the yeast to be active and eat the sugar you added. Cold temp. will drop the yeast out of suspension and they won't be able to eat the sugar and give off the CO2 to carbonate the beer.

You can force carbonate the beer with CO2 tank in the fridge...... when doing that, it is good that the beer is cold. Do one or the other.
 

andrewmaixner

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The yeast need to be near room temp to eat the sugar, if that is what you are asking. If they can't eat, the can't produce CO2.
 
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dhelegda

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The beer was cold crashed and has been put in to a keg. It went back in the refrigerator after I kegged it. If I pull it out and let it warm up to room temp should it be find and prime. Should I tip the keg upside down to get some yeast off the bottom and back in to suspension?
 

andrewmaixner

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The beer was cold crashed and has been put in to a keg. It went back in the refrigerator after I kegged it. If I pull it out and let it warm up to room temp should it be find and prime. Should I tip the keg upside down to get some yeast off the bottom and back in to suspension?
You probably want to give it a good shaking / rolling to get the yeast up after you warm it.
If it doesn't carb still, make a *super-small* starter, or a little active yeast keausen, and add it. You might then want to hit it with gelatin after it carbs, as there may be more yeast than desirable in there, and the gelatin will help keep everything but the first few ounces clear of the dip tube upon serving.
 
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