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Priming in the bottle

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Dark_Ale

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For a 12 ounce bottle, How much brown sugar would you use if you primed right in the bottle. Has anyone ever primed this way? It seems like it would be easier to make a syrup and add it to the bottle rather than trying to get the brown sugar in the little hole in the top of the bottle. I was told one teaspoon per bottle by the local HBS. I had three small kegs that I filled and I did not want to waste the rest, so I added 1 teaspoon per bottle and filled them up. Does anyone have an easier way to add sugar to the bottle, or less messier way.
 

Roger

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Dark_Ale said:
For a 12 ounce bottle, How much brown sugar would you use if you primed right in the bottle. Has anyone ever primed this way? It seems like it would be easier to make a syrup and add it to the bottle rather than trying to get the brown sugar in the little hole in the top of the bottle. I was told one teaspoon per bottle by the local HBS. I had three small kegs that I filled and I did not want to waste the rest, so I added 1 teaspoon per bottle and filled them up. Does anyone have an easier way to add sugar to the bottle, or less messier way.
I mix the priming sugar into the wort in the bottling bin then bottle, it works well for me.
 

ctrlfreak

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Roger said:
I mix the priming sugar into the wort in the bottling bin then bottle, it works well for me.
I do this with my kegs and the same principle for you. Mix in the priming sugar then fill the kegs and then the few left over bottles. IMHO this priming lets your beer "develop" more than force carb.
 

homebrewer_99

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Don't you just LOVE mix and match?

Priming each bottle is so uncertain that it's a no-no.

In another thread I recommended taking your empty carboys and plastic primary buckets and marking off 1 gal increments with nail polish. You can mark off 1/2 gals as well if you wish. If you had done that earlier then you would know exactly how much priming sugar to use based upon the measurement lines on the container. Next time you'll be ready!

I presume you are talking about mini-kegs ("party-fass" in German). You filled 3 of them, but you forgot to tell us how much brew you had left to bottle.

Answering your question properly is difficult at best. If you already used 1 tsp per bottle then the fate of the beer is in your hands.

Let's assume you had only 8 beers left. With 1 tsp per bottle I would recommend checking them in about 3 days of so, depending on the temperture of the room you use for conditioning. The warmer the better naturally, but TOO warm is going to get you in trouble with the clean up crew.

Just keep an eye on them. Sample one in about 3-4 days then the second a couple of days after. Pretty soon they'll all be gone and your problem will be solved. :D
 
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Dark_Ale

Dark_Ale

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homebrewer_99 said:
Don't you just LOVE mix and match?

Priming each bottle is so uncertain that it's a no-no.

In another thread I recommended taking your empty carboys and plastic primary buckets and marking off 1 gal increments with nail polish. You can mark off 1/2 gals as well if you wish. If you had done that earlier then you would know exactly how much priming sugar to use based upon the measurement lines on the container. Next time you'll be ready!

I presume you are talking about mini-kegs ("party-fass" in German). You filled 3 of them, but you forgot to tell us how much brew you had left to bottle.

Answering your question properly is difficult at best. If you already used 1 tsp per bottle then the fate of the beer is in your hands.

Let's assume you had only 8 beers left. With 1 tsp per bottle I would recommend checking them in about 3 days of so, depending on the temperture of the room you use for conditioning. The warmer the better naturally, but TOO warm is going to get you in trouble with the clean up crew.

Just keep an eye on them. Sample one in about 3-4 days then the second a couple of days after. Pretty soon they'll all be gone and your problem will be solved. :D
I am not really brewing for competition. It was a 3 gallon experiment. The beer actually turned out wonderful, prior to kegging anyways. I was using the filltap system with the plastic keg. The beer was so good I did not want to put anymore in the plastic keg, So I filled up on plastic keg a little over a gallon, it called for 2 tablespoons of priming sugar right into the bottle. My other beers have turned out wonderful. I had enough left for 10 12oz bottles. I will try to find this thread and let you know in a couple of weeks. Thanks for the info
 

Janx

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2 T of sugar per bottle sounds like a lot. I'd put them someplace where they won't hurt anyone should they blow. It's tough to measure out the right amount accurately even if you do know what to shoot for, which is why, as homebrewere_99 said, priming generally isn't done this way.

Since you already have a kegging setup, I'd think about getting a counterpressure bottler. Then you can bright your beer in a keg and bottle it with perfect carbonation. Plus no yeast in the bottles! :D
 
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Dark_Ale

Dark_Ale

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Janx said:
2 T of sugar per bottle sounds like a lot. I'd put them someplace where they won't hurt anyone should they blow. It's tough to measure out the right amount accurately even if you do know what to shoot for, which is why, as homebrewere_99 said, priming generally isn't done this way.

Since you already have a kegging setup, I'd think about getting a counterpressure bottler. Then you can bright your beer in a keg and bottle it with perfect carbonation. Plus no yeast in the bottles! :D
It was 2 tablespoons for the 1.5 gallon keg. Ya I need to get rid of them,
I have determined its 1/2 teaspoon per 12 oz bottle.....I dont plan to do this in the future, it was a last min thing. Anyway thanks for the info when I pop the top at 2 weeks I will let ya know how it is.....Later
 

Janx

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Sorry...I'm a dumbass...should have read more closely, and I should have known you wouldn't dump 2 T of sugar into each bottle :D

KABOOM!

Anyway, counterpressure bottlers are pretty cool if you have a bottling buddy. Not as easy to find as a taste-test buddy, but they do exist :D
 

homebrewer_99

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There was a comment earlier about someone who doesn't brew for competition...my reply...so what?!?

I don't brew for competition either even though I have won best of style and best of show before.

The whole point is brewing something you can really enjoy and want to share with friends (or not).

It's very disheartening when you brew a batch and there's something slightly wrong with it and you don't know how to repair it. I hope that's where I can come in and help save your day (brew).

It's another thing to brew a batch that tastes so good that you just want to duplicate it over and over again.

I am fairly certain you are not brewing just to waste your time, money, and possible good beer.

My goal in brewing is not to brew something that is just passible.

Sure there might be a few batches that you may enjoy and your friends won't. Just think of it as their loss.

I try to perfect every batch as much as I can control it.

Your goal should also be GOOD BEER!!! :D
 
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Dark_Ale

Dark_Ale

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homebrewer_99 said:
There was a comment earlier about someone who doesn't brew for competition...my reply...so what?!?

I don't brew for competition either even though I have won best of style and best of show before.

The whole point is brewing something you can really enjoy and want to share with friends (or not).

It's very disheartening when you brew a batch and there's something slightly wrong with it and you don't know how to repair it. I hope that's where I can come in and help save your day (brew).

It's another thing to brew a batch that tastes so good that you just want to duplicate it over and over again.

I am fairly certain you are not brewing just to waste your time, money, and possible good beer.

My goal in brewing is not to brew something that is just passible.

Sure there might be a few batches that you may enjoy and your friends won't. Just think of it as their lose.

I try to perfect every batch as much as I can control it.

That should be your goal also. :D

GOOD BEER!!!
I totaly agree
 

KingDeer

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So instead of priming bottles, could I add the sugar to the secondary? I'm doing batches of 2.5 gallons or so at a time, and secondary is a five gallon container. Then bottle off? How long would I need to let them sit? Thanks in advance.
 

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