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Priming bottles

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kingoslo

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How much fresh yeast and sugar do I add to prime both 0,33l and 0,5l bottles?

Thanks,
Marius
 

Kickass

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The general rule of thumb for priming with corn sugar is ¾ cup boiled into 16-20 ounces of water for a 5 U.S. gallon batch. The amount of water doesn’t have to be spot on; I’ve used a little more water to add just a bit more quantity to my batch.

As far as yeast goes, unless you went crazy with a very high gravity and long fermentation period, you have no need to add any. What were your gravities and how long have you been fermenting?
 
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kingoslo

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The general rule of thumb for priming with corn sugar is ¾ cup boiled into 16-20 ounces of water for a 5 U.S. gallon batch. The amount of water doesn’t have to be spot on; I’ve used a little more water to add just a bit more quantity to my batch.

As far as yeast goes, unless you went crazy with a very high gravity and fermentation period, you have no need to add any. What were your gravities and how long have you been fermenting?
1st batch:

Belgian Strong Ale
OG: 80
Fermented two weeks

2nd batch:

Hefe-Weisen
OG: 75
Fermented two weeks

I am doing serious 2ndary to get rid of as much yeast as I can.

The hefe should be a bit cloudy, right? So do I add more yeast to that?

Thanks,

Marius
 

Kickass

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if it were me i wouldn't add any extra, it sounds like you're going to be ok. i just bottled an ipa (1.063 og) that was in the primary for 10 days and the secondary 2 weeks. i chilled and opened at test beer after a week of bottle conditioning and it was carbonated really well
 

ChshreCat

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You'll be better off measuring your sugar by weight rather than volume. 3/4 cup can be different from one scoop to the next depending on how packed it ends up in the cup.
 
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kingoslo

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So how many grams of sugar you reckon for each US gal of beer?

But surely I should add some yeast to the hefe to make it cloudy?

Thanks,
Marius
 

ChshreCat

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If you used a hefe yeast then it should be nice and cloudy. If you didn't, then I still wouldn't put anymore yeast in it.

How much sugar to add depends on style and preference. Here's an online tool that will give you a good starting point. It's in ounces though, so you'll have to do the math to grams yourself. :D

TastyBrew.com | Homebrewing Calculators | Botting Priming Calculator
 

HOP-HEAD

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My last wheat, brewed with 1 packet of Safebrew WB-06, was crystal clear when bottled without adding any yeast. Carbonated to perfection with 3/4 cup priming sugar...

Prior to serving, I lay it on it's side, roll it from one hand to the other, back, then pour rather vigorously. Drinks cloudy, tastes like a good hefe should.

Poured slowly, it looks like a bud light.... tastes like a yeast-less hefe.
 

ChshreCat

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Traditionally, you should pour out all but about a half inch into the glass, then swirl that last bit of beer to get the yeast up and pour that in. It's actually kinda dramatic to watch as the cloud spreads through the formerly near-clear beer.
 
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