Priming and bottle conditioning trappist

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BrewingCzech

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Hi, I'm new to homebrewing. I've brewed 7 batches so far.
Me and my friend we really like Orval Trappist beer so we wanna make it.
I found a nice clone recipe here :
https://byo.com/cider/item/3027-orval-trappist-ale-clone
Basically I have 2 questions. People at other forums say, that they add fresh dry yeast
when bottling a trappist so it carbonates well and fast. But this recipe requires a second addition
of yeast to secondary. If I do that, do I still need to add yeast when bottling?
Second question is: Does amount of viable yeast in bottles affect carbonation levels, or is it just
amount of priming sugar that determines it?
I wonder whether I really need to use champagne bottles if I use normal or slightly more than normal amount of priming sugar. Could I use standard 12 oz bottles in theory?
Thanks for answers and I apologize for my English, I'm not a born speaker.
 

MaxStout

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Hi, I'm new to homebrewing. I've brewed 7 batches so far.
Me and my friend we really like Orval Trappist beer so we wanna make it.
I found a nice clone recipe here :
https://byo.com/cider/item/3027-orval-trappist-ale-clone
Basically I have 2 questions. People at other forums say, that they add fresh dry yeast
when bottling a trappist so it carbonates well and fast. But this recipe requires a second addition
of yeast to secondary. If I do that, do I still need to add yeast when bottling?
Second question is: Does amount of viable yeast in bottles affect carbonation levels, or is it just
amount of priming sugar that determines it?
I wonder whether I really need to use champagne bottles if I use normal or slightly more than normal amount of priming sugar. Could I use standard 12 oz bottles in theory?
Thanks for answers and I apologize for my English, I'm not a born speaker.
Your English is just fine!

That second pitch should provide enough remaining yeast to carbonate. The beer is only around 6%, so yeast die-off isn't likely to be a problem, even after the 2 months in secondary. That said, if you want to be extra sure, you could pitch some neutral yeast, like CBC-1, at bottling. The amount of carbonation is primarily dependent on the amount of priming sugar you add--provided you have viable yeast to consume it. Temperatures during fermentation also affect the amount of residual CO2 already in solution, and that residual CO2 impacts overall carbonation volume as well. A priming calculator is very helpful for this.

The recipe calls for 1.2 cups corn sugar. That's a lot to prime 5 gal. of beer, but that is true to style, as that beer is well-carbonated. Most ordinary beer bottles are designed to withstand a max of about 3.0 volumes of CO2. Your priming sugar addition will likely carb to that level or perhaps even higher (I'd have to know the actual weight of the sugar to more accurately calculate CO2 volumes). The recipe calls for heavy bottles for a reason. It would be safer to use champagne bottles, or Belgian stubbies. If those are not available, you could bottle in 16 oz. PET plastic with new twist caps.
 
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BrewingCzech

BrewingCzech

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Thank you MaxStout! I'll follow your advice. You sound like you know what you're talking about.
I don't like the idea of putting that trappist into plastic bottles though. Seems like I will have to invest in the champagne ones, but every hobby costs something. Thanks and have a good day.
 
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