Primary fermentor in cooler method

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sdufford

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Hi guys, I was wondering if you all typically let the primary fermentor sit at room temp until the yeast gets going before chilling it down to desired ferm temp in the swamp cooler (or whatever cooling method you use)?

I just brewed a batch yesterday and decided to let it sit out for a bit to let the yeasties get goin. I woke up the next morning with the airlock bubbling like crazy and quickly got it situated in my tub cooler. Should I have just started them out in the tub cooler (at around 65 degrees or so)?
 

cheezydemon3

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That much liquid (5 gal right?) takes a while to cool.

Unless your wort is already 68F or lower when you pitch, your swamp cooler will be fighting to get the temp down before fermentation gets going.

I let it sit 5 hours or so before moving to my cool basement, but that seems to almost give the yeast too much head start.

Of course I am using already active yeast from a previous batch.

Dry yeast sprinkled on top will take more time.
 

Kerberbb

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Its an either or type of answer from me. Lagers i typically let stay warm before dropping. Ales it just depends on how much yeast I am pitching. If I made a starter or dumping on trub I drop it immediately. But if I am pitching from a vial or smack pack. I give it 12-24. Either way RDWHAHB!
 

JLem

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the problem with pitching too warm though is that esters are produced early during the ferment. Warmer temps tend to lead to more ester production. So, really, I think the ideal situation is to get the wort cool first and then pitch - let the bulk of fermentation (the early stages) take place in the cooler temps. Like cheesydemon said above, it will take a while for the swamp cooler to get the temps down, so if you wait until active fermentation has started to get it cooling, it's going to stay at those warmer temps for a while - and a lot of esters could be produced. Letting the temp rise after a few days is less of a problem, and, in many cases, is desirable to make sure that fermentation is complete.

Depending on what temp it was when you pitched and how long it stayed warm and what yeast you used, you could end up with a fruitier (more estery) beer. But as long as temps weren't too crazy high (like close to 80F) for too long, you'll end up with a good beer.

Besides, at this point, nothing you can do about it, so RDWHAHB!

(EDIT: I generally only brew ales, so I am not sure if the above applies to lagers)
 
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