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uglygoat

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just came from sam's club, owned by the godless walmart ;)

i found a stainless steel turkey frier, all 304 industrial food grade, basically a burner/stand unit that can be hooked up to propane, the regulator, a 34 quart stainless pot(the only reason i bought the whole contraption), vented lid, a slew of little metal gadgets that i'll prolly never use a thermometer that may or may not work for what i need it to do. all for the whopping price of 67 us dollars. now i have looked far and wide and cannot find a 34 quart ss stock pot for anything less than 100 us dollars, usually much more.

i'm psyched cause i gots the big pot i now need to venture into the all grain, and one burner. i might go and buy another later on before they sell them all, but i have to pace these purchases so my wife doesn't kill me and put me in our cystern ;)

anyhoo, the pot appears to be very well made :)
 

Janx

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Hey that sounds like a sweet deal! Go get yourself some stainless valve fittings and put a valve at the bottom and you'll be stoked. So, that's like 8.5 gallons, right? More than enough room to boil a full 5 or 6 gallon batch. Cheers! :D
 
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I actually just saw that at Sams as well but didn't look at it too closely. I ended up getting a turkey fryer earlier at Home Depot (7g, not stainless) with the burner, thermometer etc. and I think I paid $40. But 8.5g stainless would be very nice indeed. Hmmm, on the way home from work soon, going to start an Oatmeal cream stout tonight, Sam's on the way home...

By the way that thermometer works great during the steep. Compared it to my other thermometer (smaller) and is accurate. Just leave it in the wort.

Speaking of brewing this evening this will be the 1st batch I'll be putting right on to the yeast cake of my primary after I rack whats in there. I was going to: gently siphon the 2g or so water on in, then gently siphon the cooled wort in. What about all the crap hanging on the sides of the primary just leave it alone or maybe wipe it off with a clean/sanitized papertowel or something? Aeration? You don't want to start stirring it all up do you?? (glad I started thinking about this)...
 
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uglygoat

uglygoat

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feck it, leave it there, the yeast will spit it all over the inside of the carboy. i wouldn't worry about not disturbing the yeast and sludge on the bottom, when the yeast gets going all that stuff is gonna rocket up and swirl everywhere anyway :)

have fun, and watch it, you'll see activity very soon.
 
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Got you on not cleaning that goop up. Actually my last batch I did, I strained the cooled wort into the primary to get the rabbit; uhm er hop pellet goo out. So if I don't need to worry about being gentle then straining right onto the slurry will aerate as well. Thats the plan unless someone says Noooo!! :)
 

Janx

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Don't wipe it, don't touch it with anything that isn't necessary. Minimize exposure. I never touch my fermenter with anything on the inside except the incoming hose, and I sanitize that well. I splash iodophor solution around the lip of my fermenter before opening it. In general just try to be really clean with this trick. All that crap stuck to the fermenter is fine. Not having to clean it is one of the big benefits ;)

And let it disturb the yeast all you want. Getting it all stirred up is a good thing. Aeration is a great and necessary thing once the wort is cooled (BTW...I know it's obvious, but the wort does need to be chilled before you put it on the yeast).

Also, I always taste the beer I'm racking out to make sure it tastes clean. I hope you like this trick! Cheers! :D
 
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Cool, thanks Janx. Yep, chilled wort... Sounds like a fun approach. I got to get out of this darn office and get to brewing!!

Only one problem; not sure how I'm going to use my hydrometer if its going right into the yeast :D
 
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uglygoat

uglygoat

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yeah! it's a wing it sorta approach if you track your gravities and record that stuff. fortunately i don't know how to use my hydrometer, it always bobs up and down and rotates so i can never read it. ;)


i'm so unorganized i just tape grain bills and hop lists to the carboys as i transfer batches. it usually has a date printed on it from the hbs, so i assume one week primary and count from there....
 

rightwingnut

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I found a good deal on stainless kettles on e-bay. I haven't checked, but I have a feeling it wasn't a one-time deal. Four S.S. kettles for about $125 when you include shipping. Sizes were (if I remember right) from 10 gal, on down to 7.5. Anyone need kettles, check it out...they are kinda thin-walled, and only came with two lids (which wasn't mentioned), but all in all, a good deal. Falcon Industries....
 
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It may not be a problem (I haven't much experience in the hobby yet) but those turkey fryer pots have VERY thin bottoms. I am speaking from a cooking standpoint and in that hobby, the thin bottoms are a BIG negative. I went out and bought a tripple bottom pot from WalMart to use in my brewing. This may not be a concern as long as none of the ingredients go straight to the bottom where they can scorch when you add them. I noticed on my first (and only so far) batch that when I poured in my malt extract, it did make it to the bottom and I was glad at that point that I had the thick bottom pot which dissipates the heat much more evenly.
One other piece of equipment I can bring to the table from my cooking hobby are thermometers. I have yet to get into anything other than kit brewing but I can see in the future where my corded meat thermometers may come in handy. They have an electronic display, alarming when set temperature is reached, stainless steel probes, high temperature ranges (up to boiling temps if you get a good one) and could be left in whatever you are cooking/brewing all the time even if a lid is put on the pot. These are rather cheap. Wal-Mart sells some for 15 dollars but I get a bit of a better brand off the internet for about 30.
 

Janx

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It's a really good point. I imagine you'd see more carmelization of the wort with a thinner kettle than a thicker one.
 

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