Pressurized Fermentation for Capacity Constraints

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Pehlman17

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For those of you with knowledge and experience with pressurized fermentation, I need some guidance here. I am curious as to whether you've had any experience with, or heard much about, pressurized fermentation done at ambient/room temperature. (ie, in a closet, not temp-controlled) Particularly because I currently only have the capacity to keep one chest freezer, so I need to use it for both fermentation and conditioning/serving. But I was wondering whether I could just use the freezer specifically for cold-conditioning and serving, and do my fermentation at room temp, but under a bit of pressure to keep esters and fusel alcohols in check. I ferment in corny kegs.

I often see people imply that pressure fermentation with ale strains is pointless because it’ll keep all of the yeast character at bay. And while I’m sure it can be true and high pressures, my thinking is that perhaps there is a sweet spot where the right amount of pressure could subdue the effects of a warmer fermentation, but perhaps still allow some character to come through. I seem to recall an episode on The Brewing Network where Jamil mentioned something about a brewery that ferments their beers at low to mid 70’s Fahrenheit, and how it’s the pressure in the large cylindoconical fermenters that allows them to quickly ferment clean ales at those temps without seeing the side effects we’d normally expect.

My main reason for asking is that I can currently only brew when I’ve completely kicked the keg of my previous batch. I’d love to be able to get a better rotation going where I could have one beer fermenting as the previous one is still on tap. I’d rather not get back into bottling again, unless I was entering a competition. I don’t think the wife would let me take up more space right now with another fermenter and full glycol rig. (A man can dream) I also know that Kveik strains are gaining in popularity for similar purposes, but I would still like the flexibility of choosing yeast strains for specific classic styles whenever possible.
 

Red over White

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Yes you can ferment under pressure at room temperature and produce great beers. You need to learn your yeasts and see if they give you the results you want. You can use various pressures during the ferment as you get know your yeast. Ale yeast under minimal pressure will still give esters true to style with most strains. Lager yeasts can be put under higher pressure early to suppress esters.
 

humpadilo

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I recently got my Fermzilla. I have brewed about 4 lagers so far in my closet with no temp control. It’s typically low 70s. All of my beers came out really good. I’ve been making ales for about 8-9 years. I am extremely happy with the beers I’ve been producing recently. Except for one, but that is because I screwed up the grain bill.

If those 4 lagers I made, I usually keg them in 12-14 days from brew day and drink a day or two after kegging. They would probably be better if I aged them, but they are pretty damn good as I drink them. If I can get ahead in brewing I will age them.
 
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Pehlman17

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I recently got my Fermzilla. I have brewed about 4 lagers so far in my closet with no temp control. It’s typically low 70s. All of my beers came out really good. I’ve been making ales for about 8-9 years. I am extremely happy with the beers I’ve been producing recently. Except for one, but that is because I screwed up the grain bill.

If those 4 lagers I made, I usually keg them in 12-14 days from brew day and drink a day or two after kegging. They would probably be better if I aged them, but they are pretty damn good as I drink them. If I can get ahead in brewing I will age them.
Any recommendation on a good general place to start pressure-wise? I've heard some say start on the low end first as you figure out each yeast's pressure tolerance. Maybe around 7-8 psi for ales? I suppose lager strains would need a bit more pressure at these temps perhaps. The area where I would ferment would also be in that mid-low 70's Fahrenheit range and likely doesn't fluctuate more than a couple degrees throughout the day.
 

humpadilo

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Any recommendation on a good general place to start pressure-wise? I've heard some say start on the low end first as you figure out each yeast's pressure tolerance. Maybe around 7-8 psi for ales? I suppose lager strains would need a bit more pressure at these temps perhaps. The area where I would ferment would also be in that mid-low 70's Fahrenheit range and likely doesn't fluctuate more than a couple degrees throughout the day.
First of all, I’m far far far from an expert. But on lagers, I just set my spunding valve to 25-30 after I cool my wort down to about 75-80 F and leave it alone for two weeks until I keg.

I have done one ale and I heard that the PSI can be a bit trickier. The one I did brew under pressure seemed like it was underwhelming. I may need to research more on ale yeast under pressure. From what I’ve found so far, I would just set it basically 1-2 PSI for the aerobic stage (24-48 hours), and then raise it to maybe 15 or so for the rest of fermentation.

My goal on brewing right now is to keep all my beers at about 14 days from brew day to drinking.
 

DuncB

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I feel that if you want yeast expression at least open for the first few days, but if things are going to get hotter than you want then the pressure could stop over expression. When I started with my pressure fermenters I just used to use the recommended yeast and have about 10 psi build and fermented a couple of celsius warmer than the low end of the yeast. I thought the beer was okay.
Now I ferment the lagers under pressure if making quickly, ales I start open and then spund towards the end of ferment to carbonate and purge kegs.
 
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