Power cord with inline 240V GFI protection

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

highland_brewer

Short Circuited Brewers
Joined
Mar 19, 2013
Messages
532
Reaction score
363
Location
Columbus
I get asked ALL THE TIME.. can I plug my 240V brewing system into my dryer outlet? I decided to make a video showing how to make a power cord with inline GFI protection so you can. It is about $100 for all the parts. Only limitation is it is only able to handle 4800 watts max (20 amps)

 
Thanks for the video. I recently put a GFCI breaker in my dryer circuit rather than go this route. It was only about $80 for the breaker, and the 30 amp inline GFCI cords were much more expensive.
 
Thanks for the video. I recently put a GFCI breaker in my dryer circuit rather than go this route. It was only about $80 for the breaker, and the 30 amp inline GFCI cords were much more expensive.
Breaker in the main panel is definitely better way to go. HOWEVER.. those in apartments and rental that can't change breakers will get good use of this cord. :yes:
 
Thanks for the video. I was thinking I'd be stuck in 120V land for some time (rental), but this made me look at the foundry as it can switch between 120/240 if the proper power source is available. Great for taking the rig to a friends house with 120V but still able to use a dryer 240V at home!
 
So what about something like this?
inline GFCI
plus
extension cord

Both components look like they're rated at 30A (7200W?) with 10awg. The combined cost is significantly cheaper than installation of a new outlet in my garage. I don't rent, but I do move every 3-4 years so I've been looking for a portable solution.
 
It doesn't look like the two items have compatible plugs.
Maybe I'm overlooking something simple...I'm very new to electric brewing and the terminology. Here's how I read it:

Dryer outlet = 14-30R (female)
Inline GFCI = 14-30P (male) to 14-30R (female)
Extension cord = 14-30P (male) to 14-30R (female)
Brewing system cord = 14-30P (male)

Are there subtleties to the plugs that I'm not seeing? Is it the twist lock thing?
 
Maybe I'm overlooking something simple...I'm very new to electric brewing and the terminology. Here's how I read it:

Dryer outlet = 14-30R (female)
Inline GFCI = 14-30P (male) to 14-30R (female)
Extension cord = 14-30P (male) to 14-30R (female)
Brewing system cord = 14-30P (male)

Are there subtleties to the plugs that I'm not seeing? Is it the twist lock thing?


Yeah the extension cord is twist lock and the gfci pigtail is straight blade. It could be changed on the pigtail but that is a little work.
 
I see, thank you. I found this and the corresponding 14-30P to L14-30R adapter but I'm now quickly getting into frankenstein territory with all the connections, and the total cost is pushing $500. May be worth it just to have the electrician wire it up.
 
Last edited:
So my electrician just quoted me $1100 to wire up the sub panel. :no:

I get that my Frankenstein solution isn't pretty (outlet, pigtail, adapter, extension cord, adapter, kettle)...but is it safe?
 
So my electrician just quoted me $1100 to wire up the sub panel. :no:

I get that my Frankenstein solution isn't pretty (outlet, pigtail, adapter, extension cord, adapter, kettle)...but is it safe?

You likely already know the answer to that question by virtue of asking right? I’m not an electrician (nor can I even pretend to be one, electrical work scares the 💩 out of me) so I’m not qualified to answer in any fashion.

But..a sub panel is bound to have future use case of some sort right? Doesn’t seem like a bad investment to make if you think of it that way?
 
You likely already know the answer to that question by virtue of asking right?
I don't actually...it's an honest question. It seems safe to me, if not a little unorthodox, but I know next to nothing about electricity.

As for the future use case, it actually tilts toward the portable solution. I'm guaranteed to move in 3-5 years, so any money I spend on permanent wiring is sunk cost.
 
So my electrician just quoted me $1100 to wire up the sub panel. :no:

I get that my Frankenstein solution isn't pretty (outlet, pigtail, adapter, extension cord, adapter, kettle)...but is it safe?

$1100 sounds really high.

A spa panel costa about $80 in my area. To wire in a 30amp plug about 2 feet away from my main panel in the garage cost about $170. I would get a second or third quote.
 
Don't most homes require a GFI 240v in laundry rooms?

Not that i am aware of.

Dryer and stove outlets now are required to be 4-prong w' a dedicated ground in newer builds tho...

I kept the NEMA-5 plug on my Foundry, and used the in-line southwire adapter and a NEMA-14 dryer plug with the neutral bar removed. Very similar to what was shown in the video.
 
I think my best course of action would be to change my 2 pole 30 amp breaker that my dryer runs on to a 2 pole 30 amp GFCI breaker. Then change my plug on the foundry to a twist lock to plug into an adapter cord to plug into my dryer outlet. What do you think?
 

Attachments

  • 51lK4Wai29L._AC_SL1004_.jpg
    51lK4Wai29L._AC_SL1004_.jpg
    30.6 KB · Views: 5
I think my best course of action would be to change my 2 pole 30 amp breaker that my dryer runs on to a 2 pole 30 amp GFCI breaker. Then change my plug on the foundry to a twist lock to plug into an adapter cord to plug into my dryer outlet. What do you think?
That will work, but why not just put a dryer plug on the Foundry cord?

Brew on :mug:
 
While this is an option, I've said it before, and I'll say it again, YOU SHOULD NEVER MIX 120V AND 240V PLUGS AND OUTLETS. If you are going to make up Frankenstein, PLEASE buy one more 240v plug and put it on the current extension cord. If you want to convert back to 120v brewing, another plug is $3 at harbor freight or $5 at a big box store. Be SAFE.
 
Sorry I should have picked a better pic from the web. My plugs are actually L14-30 I have an extension cord with L14-30 plugs also. 10 gauge wire.
 
Last edited:
this is a new requirement in the 2020 national electrical code. before that, it was just 125 volt 15 and 20 amp receptacles. same rules that apply to laundry rooms also apply to bathrooms, outdoors, within 6' of a sink, etc.

This is good info moving forward, while most will need to realize that they are likely dealing with non-GFI 240v outlets in current installations.
 
I wanted to leave my Foundry un-altered.

I live in a townhouse with a non-GFI NEMA-14 dryer outlet.

This adapter allows me to use 240v at my place, and 120v with the flick of a switch at a friends place.

The GFI breaker is always the best if you can swap it, but some of us do not have that option.

I do understand the concern with mixing 120 and 240 standards tho for folks less versed in electrical work.
 

Attachments

  • 20220221_232344.jpg
    20220221_232344.jpg
    638.6 KB · Views: 20
  • 20220221_232303.jpg
    20220221_232303.jpg
    804.3 KB · Views: 20
Back
Top