pot question

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chemist308

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I'd like to try an all grain batch at some point. Here are some questions for when I do:
1. My wort pot is 24 quart (6 gallon). Can I use this pot for steeping an all grain batch?
2. Could I possibly steep 4 gallons and then add a gallon of water to the fermenter?
 

Yooper

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Usually for AG, you collect 6.5-7 gallons of wort and boil it down to 5 gallons. (I usually make 5.25 gallons). You'd have to make a smaller batch which wouldn't really be worth it, or you could split your boil into half and use two pots. I use a 30 quart pot, but it's really just barely big enough. I'd love to get a 40 quart.
 

Gnome

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Not to change the subject line, But Yooper there's a 26 gal pot with two kids in it over on the Washington Craigs list.
 

Brett0424

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It sounds like you may need to do a little more research before you dive into this. Or maybe I'm misunderstanding you. But you're not going to "steep" grains for an all grain batch you're going to mash them. Very similar things, yes, but in steeping your goal is simply to get color and flavor from the grains. In mashing you will need to hold the grains at a specific temperature in order to convert the starches into fermentables. DO you have a mash tun to do this in? If you're asking if it's big enough to boil in then you're cutting it close. You could do it but would probably want to design your recipe to have water added to it.
 

Yooper

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Gnome said:
Not to change the subject line, But Yooper there's a 26 gal pot with two kids in it over on the Washington Craigs list.
the last thing I need is two more kids, for crying out loud! :D

Oh, another thing- you would probably either need a MLT (mash/lauter tun). You mentioned "steeping" in the pot. You really can't do that unless you have a way to separate the sweet wort from the grains, like with a false bottom and ball valve assembly, or do it with a separate MLT and drain into your brew pot.

I can suggest a Partial- mash for that size pot! You could really do a bang up job of making great beer that way. You could get a big huge grain bag and mash ("steep") grains in it and then just remove the bag and rinse it and then add some extract. You can really make some great beers with a PM and your pot is big enough for that.
 

malkore

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maybe he was planning on trying the 'big grain bag' mash method, which is a lot like steeping, but you actually get sugars out of the grain.

it also sounds like a huge pain in the butt to me, since grain likes to clump up when damp...you always get poor efficiency vs a 'real' mash that isn't restricted by a bag.
 

freyguy

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I have a 9 gallon pot and wish I had a bigger one for 5 gal batches. I normally start with 6.5-7gal.
 

jds

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toppoppa said:
this pot has come in very handy for my brewing needs- I have 2. Cheap and they work like a champ-

http://www.thegadgetsource.com/Merc...5007093&Category_Code=CANNERS&Product_Count=2

I would recomend getting a mash tun or just convert a 5 gal or larger cooler into a mash tun. You need room to be able to move the grain around and a 5 gal cooler tends to get very compacted IMO
I use one of these for full-boil extract batches now. When I load it up with 6 gallons, there's still plenty of room, although it does bear watching to prevent the dreaded boilover.

Here's an action shot, with 6 or so gallons of 888RIS, right at the start of the boil.


I know enamelware kettles get some bad press, but this thing has worked well for me so far.
 
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