Possibly over-bittered

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Barry Walsh

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At the last minute today during brewing I decided to try a hop stand but I didn't do it properly and am a bit worried about the effect it might have on the bitterness of the beer.

So what I did was at flameout I added 40g of Galaxy and 10g of Chinook. I left that sit for 15 minutes. My error there was that I didn't cool the wort at all before attempting the hop stand.

Would this mean that my additions at flameout are more like additions at 15 minutes? If so according to brewersfriend the IBU will be around 150!
 

deks77

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40 grams thats like 1.4 ounces. . I have troubles cooling my wort, it takes my immersion chiller and at a minimum a stay in the fermentation fridge over night to get to pitching temps. I have been a bit more bitter at times, but never crazy bad.. it might not end up exactly as you want, but it probably wont be as bad as your thinking.. I always hop stand also..
 

blubrewbbq

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What type of beer is this? 1.4oz at flameout will not ruin a beer. You may actually enjoy it better than what the recipe calls for depending on the style
 

thehaze

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Those 40 grams in a boiling wort, will impart some bitterness, but I highly doubt it will add enough, to turn the beer into an unbearable bitter bomb. Yes, they will definitely add bitterness when sunk into a boiling/near boiling wort, but not nearly to the extent, some online calculators make it to be.
 
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Barry Walsh

Barry Walsh

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40 grams thats like 1.4 ounces. . I have troubles cooling my wort, it takes my immersion chiller and at a minimum a stay in the fermentation fridge over night to get to pitching temps. I have been a bit more bitter at times, but never crazy bad.. it might not end up exactly as you want, but it probably wont be as bad as your thinking.. I always hop stand also..
Cheers! Sounds like you're in Australia!

What type of beer is this? 1.4oz at flameout will not ruin a beer. You may actually enjoy it better than what the recipe calls for depending on the style
It's meant to be a hoppy American style pale ale. Decided to try a hop stand because the last couple of brews were meant to be very hoppy but they didn't end up with the aroma or flavour I was after.

Those 40 grams in a boiling wort, will impart some bitterness, but I highly doubt it will add enough, to turn the beer into an unbearable bitter bomb. Yes, they will definitely add bitterness when sunk into a boiling/near boiling wort, but not nearly to the extent, some online calculators make it to be.
Great! I was thinking that you can't dial in how many minutes I did the hop stand for on brewersfriend. I do like bitterness in my beers but was a bit worried that I'd overdone it.
 

mattdee1

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I think you might actually be surprised at how much less bitter it turns out to be vs. what you're expecting.

My only concern would be that, personally, I've not had very good luck with late-additions of Chinook... seems to come across as kind of harsh and grassy. But 10g is such a small amount, I can't see that mattering much.
 
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Barry Walsh

Barry Walsh

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I think you might actually be surprised at how much less bitter it turns out to be vs. what you're expecting.

My only concern would be that, personally, I've not had very good luck with late-additions of Chinook... seems to come across as kind of harsh and grassy. But 10g is such a small amount, I can't see that mattering much.
That's reassuring! Cheers

I'm thinking about dry hopping it with 50g of Galaxy and 30g of Chinook. Would you advise against using the Chinook for dry hopping?
 

brew703

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I personally do not use the hop stand IBU's that the calculators show. I get no where near the amounts shown.
I'm with the others. You will get some IBU's but probably not enough to ruin your brew.
 
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Barry Walsh

Barry Walsh

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I personally do not use the hop stand IBU's that the calculators show. I get no where near the amounts shown.
I'm with the others. You will get some IBU's but probably not enough to ruin your brew.
Cool thanks! Hoping I get a lot of hop flavour as my last two beers were a bit lacking.
 

Renegade Brewer

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I think you’re just fine. My NEIPA, House IPA, House pale, and House amber all have flameout hops at around half a pound for 15 gallons. These usually sit in the kettle at about 190* for 5 minutes. It takes us about 5 min to run from the kettle through the chiller to the fermenter and get 15 gallons down to pitching temp. According to beer smith I am not adding any further IBUs to the beer due to this, and based on the pallet I’d say the amount of bitterness is minimal. My NEIPA for instance is 11 IBUs, but it has 2.5 pounds of hops for the entire recipe.

At 15 minutes probably around 200* and dropping you’re isomerizing a small amount of alphas, but not to the point of really bouncing the IBUs to the point of knocking that beer out of style. What you are doing is very common for many homebrewers who use an immersion chiller. I think you’ll be just fine.
 
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Barry Walsh

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I think you’re just fine. My NEIPA, House IPA, House pale, and House amber all have flameout hops at around half a pound for 15 gallons. These usually sit in the kettle at about 190* for 5 minutes. It takes us about 5 min to run from the kettle through the chiller to the fermenter and get 15 gallons down to pitching temp. According to beer smith I am not adding any further IBUs to the beer due to this, and based on the pallet I’d say the amount of bitterness is minimal. My NEIPA for instance is 11 IBUs, but it has 2.5 pounds of hops for the entire recipe.

At 15 minutes probably around 200* and dropping you’re isomerizing a small amount of alphas, but not to the point of really bouncing the IBUs to the point of knocking that beer out of style. What you are doing is very common for many homebrewers who use an immersion chiller. I think you’ll be just fine.
Brilliant thank you for the info!
 

mattdee1

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Would you advise against using the Chinook for dry hopping?
All I can say is, if it were me, I would not dry hop with the Chinook. I did a basic pale ale, split between two fermenters, and dry-hopped one with Chinook and one with something else (I forget... Citra maybe?) I really liked the Citra version, but did not care for the Chinook version at all. The Citra was bright and fruity, whereas the Chinook was sharp and harsh. But as they say, YMMV.
 

Renegade Brewer

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It’s more of a personal preference. In the west coast style dank IPA chinook is quite common as a late or dry hop. As the juicy/hazy is becoming the fad we are seeing the Australian hops used more in late and dry hops. Chinook is a fine hop to use throughout the process, but it just depends on what you’re looking for in a hop. Read the profiles of the hops you might want to use and talk to your local homebrew shop about the characteristics each hop will provide.

One thing I will advise is don’t use the expensive Australian hops early in the boil. I see that sometimes and try to tell the customer they are just wasting a ton of money on hops. When used early in the boil you won’t get any of the character of that hop. Choose a hop with the alpha acid you’re looking for that’s around 1-3.00/ounce instead of boiling galaxy at 6.00/ounce.

As far as harshness, in some styles it is desirable. Beers like Sierra Nevada torpedo, pale ale, stone arrogant bastard all use what are considered legacy hops late in the boil and dry hop. Those are all beers which the BJCP style guidelines were originally written around.

I personally will not use simcoe as a dry hop simply because I don’t want a glass full of cat pee, but that’s just me. Many brewers enjoy it.
 
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