Possible slow mead fermentation

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Aleforge

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I am not sure if I have any issue at all, but I thought I would ask anyhow. I will refrain from making any remark towards "Stuck fermentation".

I made up a batch of mead last Friday night, OG 1.120.

I stirred and added nutrients at 24, 48 and 72 hours. Today 5 days later my gravity is at 1.100. I have been fermenting at around 63-65'.

I have no idea how quickly this should be going, however my last batch of Malkore's JOAM went very quickly (yes I know this isn't JOAM). Something else that's weird is there is zero Krausen, just a few bubbles. With little airlock activity all week.

Do you guys think that things are right where they should be, or do you think I should get more yeast and toss it in now to boost it along?

Thanks
 
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Aleforge

Aleforge

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Ya I don't really have a way to increase the temp, first time I have actually had issues with it being too cold. :(

Maybe it will just take a really long time, which is fine with me. But then again I hope the yeast doesn't get bored and quit. I need one of those brew belts I guess.
 

summersolstice

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Do you have a heating pad? I've used one in a cold basement. Turn it on low, put a heavy towl over it, and put the primary on top. How about a flood light pointed at the primary from about a foot away?
 
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Aleforge

Aleforge

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I don't have a heating pad or flood light, but both sound like good ideas if monitored. Has anyone used those "Brew belts" before? I probably need to do something, we keep out house cold year round.
 

Ceedubya

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I've seen people use a rubbermaid of water and a aquarium heater set at the desired temp. I have thought about doing this myself, as we turn the heat down during the day and I can lose a few degrees if its cold outside.
 

Mr. Nice Guy

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How much nutrient did you add?

I keep my house at 62 and for my meads I installed 2 25 watt bulbs under my bathroom counter. They keep my meads around 72, sometimes I only use 1 bulb. If I insulate them with fleece blankets they will get too warm. I have just started eperimenting with this as heating pads go bad quickly heating up a big batch and rubbermaids took up too much space. I think a ten watt bulb and a thick blanket would do it.
 

Boerderij_Kabouter

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I used to use a brew belt. It worked rather well and you can easily adjust the temp by adjusting how much of the belt is contacting the fermenter.

I would just guess that your yeast are slowly chowing down.

What yeast did you use?

For example, the first mead I made, I used Wyeast dry mead yeast and it fermented actively albeit very slowly for over a year. literally.
 
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Aleforge

Aleforge

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My notes are at home, but it was the Curt & Kathy's Sweet Varietal Mead kit from Northern Brewer.

It came with nutrients (3 additions), 2 packets of yeast and some of that ferm yeast nutrient stuff.

I hydrated for about 20min then pitched.

I think I have an old aquarium heater around, I could try that method.
 

brewingsam

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with all respect to Ceedubya but i think he is giving you advice in the wrong direction, i don't think heat is the problem, you need to rememebr that heat stresses the yeast out and makes it kick out fusal oils which can kill your mead, what this sounds to make like is a lack of proper aeration, you should be hitting that mead with a lees sitrer on a drilll twice a day to get some good oxygen down in there, i knwo it sounds liek maddness but trust me, honey, while tasty as all hell, is lacking in everything yeast needs other and sugar, i'm glad to see you are adding your nutriant in steps, butyeast needs oxygen when it is fermenting otherwise it can stress out, or stick like this is doing.
get in there with the stirer and get it moving, if you don't have a stirer you can pick up the fermeneted and slosh it around for about 5 min, that should do the trick, twice a day for a week
what yeast are you using?
 
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Aleforge

Aleforge

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Wow, well thanks for the information. That makes sense, and the only aeration it has gotten is the mad stirring on each nutrient addition. But that's only for about 30sec and doesn't "churn" it up really.
 

Ceedubya

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with all respect to Ceedubya but i think he is giving you advice in the wrong direction, i don't think heat is the problem, you need to rememebr that heat stresses the yeast out and makes it kick out fusal oils which can kill your mead, what this sounds to make like is a lack of proper aeration, you should be hitting that mead with a lees sitrer on a drilll twice a day to get some good oxygen down in there, i knwo it sounds liek maddness but trust me, honey, while tasty as all hell, is lacking in everything yeast needs other and sugar, i'm glad to see you are adding your nutriant in steps, butyeast needs oxygen when it is fermenting otherwise it can stress out, or stick like this is doing.
get in there with the stirer and get it moving, if you don't have a stirer you can pick up the fermeneted and slosh it around for about 5 min, that should do the trick, twice a day for a week
what yeast are you using?

Yep, thats what the second part of my post was referring to, the stirring. I know I found it helped when I gave mine a really good stir. As far as the heat thing, just remember I'm new to this too ;)

I did find that when I brought mine up to 68 -70 degrees I had less issues. right now its getting closer to being finished and so is much less active. As a result, it has naturally cooled off and is sitting around 65 degrees.
 

brewingsam

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churn away my friend, i won't say that you can't over aerate, but under aerating will hurt you just as much

as far as temp goes i wouldn't raise it above 70, more than that is risky buisness
 

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